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April 11, 2012
For me, the image of Mike Wallace as an iconoclastic journalist who challenged the status quo was always contradicted by his status as a hugely successful mainstream media personality. It's as if the few times he butted heads and dug into an interviewee were replayed over and over to obscure what he really was - the product and purveyor of predictable media pablum, that gray blob that dominates the news empire. The contrived and formulaic 60 Minutes set-up with guests, which was his signature, always seemed to mock real expose journalism and insult viewers.
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2013
The Ravens had matchups like this in mind when they poked and prodded Jimmy Smith in the months leading up to the 2011 NFL draft. At 6 feet 2, Smith had the height to jostle for jump balls with a leaper like A.J. Green. Having pumped out 24 reps of 225 pounds on the bench press at the NFL scouting combine, he had the strength to avoid getting bullied by Brandon Marshall. And with 32 1/4-inch-long arms, he had the length to jam a speedster like Mike Wallace. Seeing that Smith had ideal physical traits - and that the NFL's best wide receivers seemed to be getting bigger, stronger and faster every year - the Ravens felt he was too special to pass up. "How many corners are 6-foot-2, [have]
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
From the time Plaxico Burress left the Pittsburgh Steelers after the 2004 season, Hines Ward has been Ben Roethlisberger 's go-to wide receiver. That has changed with the emergence of Mike Wallace , the second-year wideout who leads the team in receptions, receiving yards and touchdown catches this season. And that's why Wallace will have a significant portion of the Ravens' attention when the Ravens visit the Steelers for Saturday's AFC divisional playoff game. "We know he's good on the deep ball, and we know that he's a deep threat," cornerback Chris Carr said.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | October 1, 2013
Each week, Baltimore Sun reporters Aaron Wilson and Matt Vensel look back at the Ravens' previous game and that of their next opponent. Saints 38, Dolphins 17 Strategy: The Dolphins, in their variation of the West Coast offense, rely on short drops and quick passes to get the ball to their receivers in the passing game. They used a lot of three-wide-receiver sets with mobile second-year quarterback Ryan Tannehill in the shotgun or pistol formation against the Saints on Monday night, especially as they tried to play catch-up after halftime.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | February 23, 2012
There has been plenty of speculation that the Ravens could be interested in Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Mike Wallace, who will be an unrestricted free agent if the Steelers don't put the franchise tag on him by March 5. The Steelers are reportedly leaning toward placing a first-round restricted tender on Wallace, which means that another team -- willing to give up their first-round pick as compensation and with the right amount of cap space...
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | April 12, 2012
Last week, the Ravens locked up their most important restricted free agent, cornerback Lardarius Webb, with a five-year contract extension. Meanwhile, the rival Pittsburgh Steelers are still reportedly experiencing headaches with their marquee restricted free agent, speedy wide receiver Mike Wallace. Wallace doesn't plan to sign his restricted free-agent tender and intends to skip the team's offseason workouts, according to ESPN. He can't be disciplined for doing so because he isn't technically under contract.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2012
I was in the CNN green room in Washington Sunday when I heard about the death of pioneering CBS newsman Mike Wallace at 93 Sunday. Being a live show, host Howie Kurtz and the CNN team scrapped the planned opening and went with a segment on Wallace that I was part of. I will post that video here as soon as CNN makes it available. UPDATE (2:25 p.m): The video from CNN's "Reliable Sources" has been added at end of this post. But here's what I think matters most about Wallace, who I was lucky enough to interview over the years.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | November 29, 2012
The Pittsburgh Steelers' decision to list wide receiver Mike Wallace as a co-starter with Emmanuel Sanders on the team's updated depth chart didn't draw much of a reaction from Wallace. “I don't really have anything to say about it,” he said during a conference call with Baltimore media Wednesday. “It is what it is.” But the move could benefit the Ravens, who would be thrilled not to have to worry about the 6-foot, 199-pound speedster this Sunday. Playing Sanders over Wallace would seem to rob Pittsburgh of its best deep threat.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 26, 1990
MIKE WALLACE was widely enough known as an interviewer in 1957 to be parodied by Sid Caesar and Carl Reiner on "Caesar's Hour," a prime-time variety show. The skit featured Reiner as Wallace grilling Caesar, who set a record for prime-time sweating.Tonight, some 33 years later, Wallace is still widely enoughknown as an interviewer to be the subject of a CBS prime-time retrospective, "Mike Wallace Then & Now," at 10 p.m. on WBAL-TV (Channel 11).The report spans 40 years of broadcasting by Wallace -- from celebrity talk shows, such as "Night Beat" in New York in the 1950s, to "60 Minutes" today.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 15, 2006
Mike Wallace, a pioneering figure of American broadcasting whose on-air persona at 60 Minutes came to represent the press as watchdog of those in power, said yesterday that he will retire as a regular correspondent at the end of the current TV season in May. CBS announced that Wallace, who will turn 88 on May 9, will remain affiliated with the most successful program in the history of network television as correspondent emeritus, though it was vague as...
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2013
Dolphins 23, Browns 10 Strategy: With a new head coach in Rob Chudzinski and new coordinators in Norv Turner and Ray Horton, the Browns will look a little different than they did a year ago. Offensively, the Browns used a variety of formations and their most common groupings were three-receiver sets and sets with two wide receivers and two tight ends. They passed often, throwing 53 times on 66 plays, in part because their running game was ineffective. Defensively, the Browns run a base 3-4. Horton likes to blitz, though, and sent five or more pass rushes on about half the plays.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 4, 2013
No it was not the most excruciating thing ever seen on television. We've seen worse. We've seen Roseanne singing the national anthem, Magic Johnson hosting a talk show and Paris Hilton existing. But if it's not number one on that list of god-awful TV, author Reza Aslan's recent interview with Lauren Green of Fox "News" is surely in the top 10. Google it if you haven't seen it. Or just ask some woman to rake her fingernails down a chalkboard for 10 minutes. Same difference. Over and over again, speaking in the honeyed, patient tone you'd use to instruct a slow child, Mr. Aslan answers the question that has been put to him by reciting his bona fides.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | June 26, 2013
In eager anticipation of the 2013 NFL season, Baltimore Sun blogger and reporter Matt Vensel will take a daily look at one of the 13 opponents on the Ravens' regular-season schedule. Today is the Miami Dolphins . After traveling to Buffalo in Week 4, the Ravens will continue their tour of the AFC East in Week 5 when they take their talents to South Beach to take on the Miami Dolphins. The Dolphins were an aggressive team this offseason, re-signing wide receiver Brian Hartline and throwing big bucks at former Ravens inside linebacker Dannell Ellerbe and former Pittsburgh Steelers wide-out Mike Wallace.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 2, 2013
In the days of the late Mike Wallace, "60 Minutes" was known for hard-hitting, aggressive journalism that asked the questions viewers wanted answered and held the powerful accountable. The Jan. 27 program on which Steve Kroft interviewed President Obama (at his request, no less) and outgoing Secretary of State Hillary Clinton fell far short of that high standard. It was the kind of softball toss you might have expected if Oprah Winfrey or Barbara Walters had conducted the interview.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | November 29, 2012
The Pittsburgh Steelers' decision to list wide receiver Mike Wallace as a co-starter with Emmanuel Sanders on the team's updated depth chart didn't draw much of a reaction from Wallace. “I don't really have anything to say about it,” he said during a conference call with Baltimore media Wednesday. “It is what it is.” But the move could benefit the Ravens, who would be thrilled not to have to worry about the 6-foot, 199-pound speedster this Sunday. Playing Sanders over Wallace would seem to rob Pittsburgh of its best deep threat.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
Usually, the speed of Ravens receiver Torrey Smith presents a lot of challenges for defenses, but the Pittsburgh Steelers aren't too concerned. Pittsburgh cornerbacks Keenan Lewis and Ike Taylor see that type of speed every day in practice when they go against Mike Wallace, who has 42 catches for 539 yards and six touchdowns.  “Honestly, he's a real fast guy but he's not Mike Wallace," Lewis said of Smith. "We've got the fastest guy in the league. Period. Every day. So when you have a guy like that you practice with, especially me in the summer time then every day in practice, I'm feeling pretty comfortable about guarding him.” Watch for Suggs I think the Pittsburgh game was the one end/outside linebacker Terrell Suggs circled initially in terms of his comeback from his Achilles injury.
FEATURES
By Henry Scarupa | April 18, 1991
Mike Wallace -- hard-boiled interviewer for CBS' "60 Minutes" -- yesterday took the hot seat himself during a brief appearance at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.The subject was depression -- his own.Mr. Wallace came to Baltimore to talk about his experience of the illness, which affects one out of 10 Americans, in a dialogue with Dr. J. Raymond DePaulo Jr., director of the Center for Affective Disorders at Johns Hopkins Hospital.The newsman said his presentation -- which drew about 500 professionals and lay people at the Hopkins-sponsored mood disorder symposium -- was part of his "payback" for the extraordinary help he had received.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | April 28, 2006
CBS newsman's wife talks of disease's toll on others The man who faced down presidents, mobsters, despots and stars was strangely withdrawn. He hesitated to enter a restaurant for fear of what people would think. He resisted social engagements. If the woman he loved suggested that he get up in the morning, he would tell her to mind her own business. He argued, criticized and complained. "It was like there was some huge, thick cloud over everything," she said, looking back on the autumn of 1984.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | April 12, 2012
Last week, the Ravens locked up their most important restricted free agent, cornerback Lardarius Webb, with a five-year contract extension. Meanwhile, the rival Pittsburgh Steelers are still reportedly experiencing headaches with their marquee restricted free agent, speedy wide receiver Mike Wallace. Wallace doesn't plan to sign his restricted free-agent tender and intends to skip the team's offseason workouts, according to ESPN. He can't be disciplined for doing so because he isn't technically under contract.
NEWS
April 11, 2012
For me, the image of Mike Wallace as an iconoclastic journalist who challenged the status quo was always contradicted by his status as a hugely successful mainstream media personality. It's as if the few times he butted heads and dug into an interviewee were replayed over and over to obscure what he really was - the product and purveyor of predictable media pablum, that gray blob that dominates the news empire. The contrived and formulaic 60 Minutes set-up with guests, which was his signature, always seemed to mock real expose journalism and insult viewers.
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