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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2012
Baltimore native and Towson University graduate Mike Rowe informed fans on Thanksgiving Eve that the Discovery Channel show he hosted, "Dirty Jobs," was no more. Rowe, the show's creator and executive producer, wrote on his blog that it was canceled: "A few weeks ago, I was officially informed that Dirty Jobs had entered into a new phase," Rowe wrote on his blog. "One I like to call, 'permanent hiatus.' Or in the more popular industry vernacular, canceled. " "Dirty Jobs" was a reality show in which Rowe and his crew traveled across the country to document some of the most unsavory jobs.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2012
Baltimore native and Towson University graduate Mike Rowe informed fans on Thanksgiving Eve that the Discovery Channel show he hosted, "Dirty Jobs," was no more. Rowe, the show's creator and executive producer, wrote on his blog that it was canceled: "A few weeks ago, I was officially informed that Dirty Jobs had entered into a new phase," Rowe wrote on his blog. "One I like to call, 'permanent hiatus.' Or in the more popular industry vernacular, canceled. " "Dirty Jobs" was a reality show in which Rowe and his crew traveled across the country to document some of the most unsavory jobs.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
As host of the Discovery Channel show "Dirty Jobs," Mike Rowe has taken work as a sewer inspector, pig farmer, mud bath mixer, maggot farmer, olive oil presser, and pigeon poop cleaner-upper. But all that's easy money compared to what could be his biggest challenge yet — convincing America that blue-collar work, especially the kind that may turn a stomach or break a back, is noble and necessary. The TV personality and Baltimore native has extended his "dirty boy" brand into a website, MikeRoweWorks.com, to highlight the decline in the trades and boost enrollment in trade schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2012
Danielle Weissman has always been athletic. She has played a lot of sports and danced a lot of dance - modern, jazz, ballet. But with hooping she has found her calling. "It was the first thing that clicked with me," she said. Yes, hooping. It, of course, goes beyond the hooping you did when you were 7 and then promptly left your hoop in the garage to be run over by the family car. Weissman, a 22-year-old lifelong Baltimorean who lives in Hampden was introduced to the frenetic, captivating and still somewhat underground world of hoop dancing in late 2008 and has since performed at area bars, clubs, parks and museums, and has taught a hooping class.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN REPORTER | September 26, 2006
Mike Rowe was almost knee-deep in hardening bat excrement when he got stuck in the dark, muggy cave. Suddenly, he no longer paid attention to the thousands of screeching winged creatures overhead raining urine on him. The Baltimore-born host of the Discovery Channel show Dirty Jobs was sinking fast, his upper body inching closer to the flesh-eating beetles that scurried along the poop's surface. DIRTY JOBS airs at 9 p.m. Tuesday on the Discovery Channel
SPORTS
By Luke Broadwater and Luke Broadwater,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 28, 2002
FARGO, N.D. - River Hill's Vince Cina had high hopes going into the Cadet and Junior Nationals here, the largest wrestling tournament in the world with 4,490 entries. "I wanted to make a good showing and maybe place in the top four," said the 98-pounder yesterday after the tournament ended. But Cina exceeded his expectations by posting an 11-1 record and taking home a third-place finish in Junior Freestyle and a national title in Greco-Roman. Cina's lone loss was to Oklahoma's Davey Mason - a 15-14 thriller in which Cina gave up a takedown with two seconds left.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2004
Brad Pendock's season just seems to be getting better with every match. Two weeks ago, he defeated Hammond's previously unbeaten Steve Sessa. In yesterday's Arundel Tournament semifinals, the Arundel senior handed Fallston's Dan Sullivan his first loss, 3-2. But Pendock closed out his evening by winning the 189-pound title in a virtual brawl, 5-2, over DeMatha's Scott Miller, a victory that clinched the overall crown in the 19-team Holiday Invitational before...
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2004
Mount St. Joseph 125-pounder Jon Kohler and 145-pounder Jake Bohn proved at the inaugural Mount Mat Madness Tournament last night that taking your lumps while wrestling a tough schedule pays off. Kohler, a ninth-seeded sophomore, scored a 10-6 upset of Chopticon's Michael Cannon, who finished fourth at last year's 4A-3A state tournament. No. 7 seed Bohn, a freshman, escaped in the final 15 seconds of his 3-2 win over Mike Kessler of Owings Mills, who was third at last year's 2A-1A states.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2005
McDonogh junior Bryn Holmes and Pallotti senior Tim Jennings took different approaches to achieve the same result as they captured National Preps wrestling championships Saturday at Lehigh University. Holmes (42-3) pinned all five opponents, including Tyler Thurgood of Blair Academy in Blairstown, N.J., in 55 seconds of their 152-pound title match. Jennings (38-3), a two-time private schools state champ, was more methodical. He won two overtime bouts and a third match 2-1 before blanking Brian Gable of Northeast Catholic in Philadelphia for the 215-pound crown.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2003
Over the past two decades, plenty of state champions - both individuals and teams - have first taken to the mats at Arundel High about this time of year. The 20th annual Arundel Invitational gets started this afternoon with a 14-team field set for two quality days of wrestling. The tournament starts at 3:30 p.m. today and resumes tomorrow morning at 9:30. Host Arundel will be joined by fellow county foes Annapolis, Broadneck and North County, with perennial state powers DeMatha, Churchill, Sherwood and Lackey also competing.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
As host of the Discovery Channel show "Dirty Jobs," Mike Rowe has taken work as a sewer inspector, pig farmer, mud bath mixer, maggot farmer, olive oil presser, and pigeon poop cleaner-upper. But all that's easy money compared to what could be his biggest challenge yet — convincing America that blue-collar work, especially the kind that may turn a stomach or break a back, is noble and necessary. The TV personality and Baltimore native has extended his "dirty boy" brand into a website, MikeRoweWorks.com, to highlight the decline in the trades and boost enrollment in trade schools.
NEWS
October 23, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Tough sailing from Ga. to Md. After a fishing vacation, Mark Everett found a crack in the hull of his nearly new 23-foot skiff. The manufacturer agreed to repair it. But getting the boat back home from Georgia proved to be anything but smooth sailing. Business baltimoresun.com/consuming Billick's recurring theme It's a recurring theme with Brian Billick's Ravens - when expectations are high, returns end up being low. It seems to work out better when his team is viewed as an underdog.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN REPORTER | September 26, 2006
Mike Rowe was almost knee-deep in hardening bat excrement when he got stuck in the dark, muggy cave. Suddenly, he no longer paid attention to the thousands of screeching winged creatures overhead raining urine on him. The Baltimore-born host of the Discovery Channel show Dirty Jobs was sinking fast, his upper body inching closer to the flesh-eating beetles that scurried along the poop's surface. DIRTY JOBS airs at 9 p.m. Tuesday on the Discovery Channel
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2005
McDonogh junior Bryn Holmes and Pallotti senior Tim Jennings took different approaches to achieve the same result as they captured National Preps wrestling championships Saturday at Lehigh University. Holmes (42-3) pinned all five opponents, including Tyler Thurgood of Blair Academy in Blairstown, N.J., in 55 seconds of their 152-pound title match. Jennings (38-3), a two-time private schools state champ, was more methodical. He won two overtime bouts and a third match 2-1 before blanking Brian Gable of Northeast Catholic in Philadelphia for the 215-pound crown.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2004
Brad Pendock's season just seems to be getting better with every match. Two weeks ago, he defeated Hammond's previously unbeaten Steve Sessa. In yesterday's Arundel Tournament semifinals, the Arundel senior handed Fallston's Dan Sullivan his first loss, 3-2. But Pendock closed out his evening by winning the 189-pound title in a virtual brawl, 5-2, over DeMatha's Scott Miller, a victory that clinched the overall crown in the 19-team Holiday Invitational before...
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2004
Mount St. Joseph 125-pounder Jon Kohler and 145-pounder Jake Bohn proved at the inaugural Mount Mat Madness Tournament last night that taking your lumps while wrestling a tough schedule pays off. Kohler, a ninth-seeded sophomore, scored a 10-6 upset of Chopticon's Michael Cannon, who finished fourth at last year's 4A-3A state tournament. No. 7 seed Bohn, a freshman, escaped in the final 15 seconds of his 3-2 win over Mike Kessler of Owings Mills, who was third at last year's 2A-1A states.
NEWS
October 23, 2007
INSIDE TODAY WHAT THEY'RE SAYING TODAY'S SUN COLUMNISTS Tough sailing from Ga. to Md. After a fishing vacation, Mark Everett found a crack in the hull of his nearly new 23-foot skiff. The manufacturer agreed to repair it. But getting the boat back home from Georgia proved to be anything but smooth sailing. Business baltimoresun.com/consuming Billick's recurring theme It's a recurring theme with Brian Billick's Ravens - when expectations are high, returns end up being low. It seems to work out better when his team is viewed as an underdog.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2012
Danielle Weissman has always been athletic. She has played a lot of sports and danced a lot of dance - modern, jazz, ballet. But with hooping she has found her calling. "It was the first thing that clicked with me," she said. Yes, hooping. It, of course, goes beyond the hooping you did when you were 7 and then promptly left your hoop in the garage to be run over by the family car. Weissman, a 22-year-old lifelong Baltimorean who lives in Hampden was introduced to the frenetic, captivating and still somewhat underground world of hoop dancing in late 2008 and has since performed at area bars, clubs, parks and museums, and has taught a hooping class.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2003
Over the past two decades, plenty of state champions - both individuals and teams - have first taken to the mats at Arundel High about this time of year. The 20th annual Arundel Invitational gets started this afternoon with a 14-team field set for two quality days of wrestling. The tournament starts at 3:30 p.m. today and resumes tomorrow morning at 9:30. Host Arundel will be joined by fellow county foes Annapolis, Broadneck and North County, with perennial state powers DeMatha, Churchill, Sherwood and Lackey also competing.
SPORTS
By Luke Broadwater and Luke Broadwater,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 28, 2002
FARGO, N.D. - River Hill's Vince Cina had high hopes going into the Cadet and Junior Nationals here, the largest wrestling tournament in the world with 4,490 entries. "I wanted to make a good showing and maybe place in the top four," said the 98-pounder yesterday after the tournament ended. But Cina exceeded his expectations by posting an 11-1 record and taking home a third-place finish in Junior Freestyle and a national title in Greco-Roman. Cina's lone loss was to Oklahoma's Davey Mason - a 15-14 thriller in which Cina gave up a takedown with two seconds left.
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