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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
With Mother's Day approaching, that suggested a motherly, guilt trip-y theme for Midweek Madness. Here's the great comic duo Elaine May and Mike Nichols, presenting a classic case of a mother whose son never calls.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
With Mother's Day approaching, that suggested a motherly, guilt trip-y theme for Midweek Madness. Here's the great comic duo Elaine May and Mike Nichols, presenting a classic case of a mother whose son never calls.
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NEWS
May 27, 1995
Severn Darden, 65, an improvisational comedian and actor who worked in theater, film and television, died yesterday of heart failure at his home in Santa Fe, N.M.He was widely recognized in the world of improvisational theater a comic genius whose wacky portrayals of a German know-it-all professor and a nitpicking expert on everything under the sun influenced two generations of comic performers. Mr. Darden was a founding member of the Second City troupe in Chicago, which produced such stars as Mike Nichols, Elaine May, Shelly Berman, Alan Arkin and Barbara Harris.
FEATURES
By William Georgiades | November 9, 2007
Philip Seymour Hoffman looks more like the rumpled New York theater director that he is than the Oscar-winning star he's been playing for the last year and a half. He's dressed in dark, nondescript clothes, his red hair is wild, his face is unshaven, and those eyes that modulate so precisely from role to role are clear. You wouldn't know he was famous at all, were it not for the fact that he's in a midtown hotel room decorated with posters from his new film, or that an assistant sits down a few feet away after fetching him a pack of Camel Lights.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 26, 1998
HOLLYWOOD -- The film "Primary Colors" seemed destined for success.Set to open March 20, the comedy-drama, based on the best seller by the political columnist Joe Klein, casts John Travolta as a roguish and progressive southern governor with a roving eye for women, Emma Thompson as his powerful and ambitious wife, Billy Bob Thornton as a James Carville-like associate and Kathy Bates as a longtime aide who knows where all the bodies are buried. It was directed and produced by Mike Nichols and adapted by his former comedy partner, Elaine May.The early signs on the film were strong.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
Primary Colors" may well be one of the best movies ever made about presidential politics, but in 1998, that is not enough.In a nation jaded by politicians and "educated" by wall-to-wall news analysis, a depiction of the manipulations and rationalizations in big-time campaigns fails to surprise or even dishearten anymore. The conclusions "Primary Colors" draws exactly mirror the calculations millions of Americans long ago made about Bill Clinton: Yes, he's flawed -- terribly, disappointingly, depressingly -- but he's also a pretty good president."
ENTERTAINMENT
By A.O. Scott and A.O. Scott,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 2, 2004
Mike Nichols' latest movie, Closer, adapted from a play by the British dramatist Patrick Marber, is about four people, arranged in crisscrossing couples, who spend most of two hours slicing one another to bits with witty and vengeful repartee. In this respect it is a lot like his first movie, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, which in 1966 was adapted from Edward Albee's celebrated play, which remains unequaled in its portrayal of heterosexuality as a form of ritualized verbal blood sport.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 12, 2004
Jude Law has been proclaimed the sexiest man alive as well as Britain's hottest acting export. But his countryman Clive Owen wipes Law off the screen as his antagonist in Closer, the Mike Nichols film that's been packing in audiences who love frank sexual melodrama or can't get enough of Julia Roberts and Natalie Portman talking dirty. Because Owen steals this study of yuppie love and infidelity from his costars, he's been winning the mainstream praise and personal accolades that often translate into Hollywood heat.
FEATURES
By William Georgiades | November 9, 2007
Philip Seymour Hoffman looks more like the rumpled New York theater director that he is than the Oscar-winning star he's been playing for the last year and a half. He's dressed in dark, nondescript clothes, his red hair is wild, his face is unshaven, and those eyes that modulate so precisely from role to role are clear. You wouldn't know he was famous at all, were it not for the fact that he's in a midtown hotel room decorated with posters from his new film, or that an assistant sits down a few feet away after fetching him a pack of Camel Lights.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to The Sun | September 3, 1995
"The Education of a Woman: The Life of Gloria Steinem," by Carolyn G. Heilbrun. New York: Dial Press: 451 pages. $24.95 Don't be misled. Critic and former Columbia professor Carolyn Heilbrun, author of "Writing a Woman's Life," has written not a biography of Gloria Steinem, icon of the women's movement, but a valentine. Exalting Ms. Steinem as "the epitome of female beauty and the quintessence of female revolution," Ms. Heilbrun devotes most of this overlong book to attacking Ms. Steinem's critics from the Redstockings to Betty Friedan, who is denigrated mercilessly and accused of jealousy of Ms. Steinem's looks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | December 12, 2004
Jude Law has been proclaimed the sexiest man alive as well as Britain's hottest acting export. But his countryman Clive Owen wipes Law off the screen as his antagonist in Closer, the Mike Nichols film that's been packing in audiences who love frank sexual melodrama or can't get enough of Julia Roberts and Natalie Portman talking dirty. Because Owen steals this study of yuppie love and infidelity from his costars, he's been winning the mainstream praise and personal accolades that often translate into Hollywood heat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By A.O. Scott and A.O. Scott,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 2, 2004
Mike Nichols' latest movie, Closer, adapted from a play by the British dramatist Patrick Marber, is about four people, arranged in crisscrossing couples, who spend most of two hours slicing one another to bits with witty and vengeful repartee. In this respect it is a lot like his first movie, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, which in 1966 was adapted from Edward Albee's celebrated play, which remains unequaled in its portrayal of heterosexuality as a form of ritualized verbal blood sport.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 20, 2002
Once upon a time in the United States of America, when we all believed that the First Amendment was flying high and healthy, it was taboo to utter in public the four-letter onomatopoetic Anglo Saxon term for the conjugal act that today can be heard several times an hour on prime time television. The Oxford English Dictionary records that the word has been in common usage at least since 1503, but less than 40 years ago the rage against "obscenity" drove prosecutors in New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago and other ostensibly sophisticated cities to hound Lenny Bruce -- an obstreperous comedian who defiantly used the word in his night-club acts -- into penury and early death.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
Primary Colors" may well be one of the best movies ever made about presidential politics, but in 1998, that is not enough.In a nation jaded by politicians and "educated" by wall-to-wall news analysis, a depiction of the manipulations and rationalizations in big-time campaigns fails to surprise or even dishearten anymore. The conclusions "Primary Colors" draws exactly mirror the calculations millions of Americans long ago made about Bill Clinton: Yes, he's flawed -- terribly, disappointingly, depressingly -- but he's also a pretty good president."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 26, 1998
HOLLYWOOD -- The film "Primary Colors" seemed destined for success.Set to open March 20, the comedy-drama, based on the best seller by the political columnist Joe Klein, casts John Travolta as a roguish and progressive southern governor with a roving eye for women, Emma Thompson as his powerful and ambitious wife, Billy Bob Thornton as a James Carville-like associate and Kathy Bates as a longtime aide who knows where all the bodies are buried. It was directed and produced by Mike Nichols and adapted by his former comedy partner, Elaine May.The early signs on the film were strong.
NEWS
By Joan Mellen and Joan Mellen,Special to The Sun | September 3, 1995
"The Education of a Woman: The Life of Gloria Steinem," by Carolyn G. Heilbrun. New York: Dial Press: 451 pages. $24.95 Don't be misled. Critic and former Columbia professor Carolyn Heilbrun, author of "Writing a Woman's Life," has written not a biography of Gloria Steinem, icon of the women's movement, but a valentine. Exalting Ms. Steinem as "the epitome of female beauty and the quintessence of female revolution," Ms. Heilbrun devotes most of this overlong book to attacking Ms. Steinem's critics from the Redstockings to Betty Friedan, who is denigrated mercilessly and accused of jealousy of Ms. Steinem's looks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | October 20, 2002
Once upon a time in the United States of America, when we all believed that the First Amendment was flying high and healthy, it was taboo to utter in public the four-letter onomatopoetic Anglo Saxon term for the conjugal act that today can be heard several times an hour on prime time television. The Oxford English Dictionary records that the word has been in common usage at least since 1503, but less than 40 years ago the rage against "obscenity" drove prosecutors in New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Chicago and other ostensibly sophisticated cities to hound Lenny Bruce -- an obstreperous comedian who defiantly used the word in his night-club acts -- into penury and early death.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | February 16, 1992
Composer Charles Strouse has a theory that his most successful musicals have been the ones whose subjects were largely unfamiliar to him."Bye Bye Birdie" is a prime example. The 1960 Broadway hit has been called the first rock and roll musical, yet Strouse's background is far from rock and roll.To the contrary, the three-time Tony Award-winner -- for "Bye Bye Birdie," "Annie" and "Applause" -- was classically trained. A graduate of the Eastman School of Music, the 63-year-old New Yorker also studied with Aaron Copland and Nadia Boulanger.
NEWS
May 27, 1995
Severn Darden, 65, an improvisational comedian and actor who worked in theater, film and television, died yesterday of heart failure at his home in Santa Fe, N.M.He was widely recognized in the world of improvisational theater a comic genius whose wacky portrayals of a German know-it-all professor and a nitpicking expert on everything under the sun influenced two generations of comic performers. Mr. Darden was a founding member of the Second City troupe in Chicago, which produced such stars as Mike Nichols, Elaine May, Shelly Berman, Alan Arkin and Barbara Harris.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | February 16, 1992
Composer Charles Strouse has a theory that his most successful musicals have been the ones whose subjects were largely unfamiliar to him."Bye Bye Birdie" is a prime example. The 1960 Broadway hit has been called the first rock and roll musical, yet Strouse's background is far from rock and roll.To the contrary, the three-time Tony Award-winner -- for "Bye Bye Birdie," "Annie" and "Applause" -- was classically trained. A graduate of the Eastman School of Music, the 63-year-old New Yorker also studied with Aaron Copland and Nadia Boulanger.
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