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Mike Lane

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TOPIC
December 5, 1999
A man of fierce opinions and the spirit of an iconoclast, Mike Lane's arrival on the Baltimore cartooning scene in 1972 rekindled memories of Edmund Duffy. Born in Sandy Springs, and educated at the University of Maryland and Stanford, Lane gladly gave up a business career at General Electric to earn his living with pen and brush.His outrageous expressions of outrage both provoke and exhilarate the newspaper's patrons, and keep his editors busy defending him. His political genesis was in the anti-war movements of the 1960s, an apt basis for a cartoonist's urge to protest greed, hypocrisy and inhumanity.
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NEWS
October 19, 2002
Frankly, I am tired of paying to have personal insults delivered to my door, so I have canceled my subscription to The Sun. The reason for my action is cartoonist Mike Lane's shameless exploitation of tragic events involving abuse of firearms to cast aspersions on patriotic, law-abiding citizens. His Oct. 9 editorial cartoon insinuates that, by virtue of my membership in the National Rifle Association, I and fellow members of that upstanding organization are somehow complicit in the spate of random killings in the vicinity of our nation's capital.
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TOPIC
December 5, 1999
Credits : Cartoons by McKee Barclay, Thomas Barclay, Duffy, Yardley and Flannery courtesy of the Milton S. Eisenhower Library of Johns Hopkins University, Hamilton Street Club, Mike Lane and Sun Archives.
NEWS
November 3, 2000
Polemical cartoons distort candidates, undermine balance When Mike Lane repeatedly belittles Texas Gov. George W. Bush and his highly accomplished father, one can only assume that Mr. Lane and The Sun have conveniently chosen to ignore how well Texas Gov. George W. Bush's academic record at Yale and as a graduate student at Harvard (where he earned an MBA, with honors) actually stacks up against Vice President Al Gore's mediocre undergraduate record -- before he flunked and dropped out of law school and divinity school.
NEWS
October 19, 2002
Frankly, I am tired of paying to have personal insults delivered to my door, so I have canceled my subscription to The Sun. The reason for my action is cartoonist Mike Lane's shameless exploitation of tragic events involving abuse of firearms to cast aspersions on patriotic, law-abiding citizens. His Oct. 9 editorial cartoon insinuates that, by virtue of my membership in the National Rifle Association, I and fellow members of that upstanding organization are somehow complicit in the spate of random killings in the vicinity of our nation's capital.
FEATURES
By Michael Pakenham | October 18, 1998
Sun staff writers continue to publish books: Three new ones are coming on the market. Following our established practice, they are listed here in alphabetical order, without critical judgment except to record that all of us at The Sun wish the books and their authors the success they unquestionably deserve."
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | August 22, 1993
The mail piles up, from readers and weeders:Dear Dirt,I have always pictured you as one of trim build, firm of flesh, tanned and supple from hours of outdoor exercise and healthy exertion. Frankly, from the illustrations that accompany your column, I am shocked to see what has become of you.I hope you take stock and set some vegetables aside instead of trying to eat them all on the spot.I pray that Mike Lane, with his customary ebullient style, has exaggerated a bit!Joel HuttonBaltimoreYou should see how I draw Mike Lane.
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF | October 25, 1992
From Sept. 1 to Oct. 20, The Sun's cartoonist KAL blasted George Bush 7 times while The Evening Sun's Mike Lane hit Mr. Bush 17 times and Dan Quayle twice. They virtually ignored Bill Clinton.According to this informal count, Kevin Kallaugher (KAL) knocked Mr. Clinton and Mr. Bush together twice and all candidates once while Mr. Lane skewered Mr. Clinton once. The artists ridiculed Ross Perot four times.Welcome to the world of the political cartoonist.If you're looking for balance in the normal sense, you won't find it here or in cartoons on other big papers.
NEWS
November 3, 2000
Polemical cartoons distort candidates, undermine balance When Mike Lane repeatedly belittles Texas Gov. George W. Bush and his highly accomplished father, one can only assume that Mr. Lane and The Sun have conveniently chosen to ignore how well Texas Gov. George W. Bush's academic record at Yale and as a graduate student at Harvard (where he earned an MBA, with honors) actually stacks up against Vice President Al Gore's mediocre undergraduate record -- before he flunked and dropped out of law school and divinity school.
NEWS
October 19, 1994
Cynical SauerbreyLast month, New Jersey Gov. Christine Whitman was down here to serve as wanna-be Maryland Gov. Ellen Sauerbrey's object lesson: You can slash state taxes and thrive.A week later, Mrs. Whitman's rush to cut taxes has slowed to a crawl -- because the state's budget can't handle any more grand gestures.Is anyone out there surprised? More important, are the Maryland voters, whose mouths water at the mention of a tax cut, paying attention?If not, are they making a list of the public services they are willing to see cut along with their taxes?
TOPIC
December 5, 1999
A man of fierce opinions and the spirit of an iconoclast, Mike Lane's arrival on the Baltimore cartooning scene in 1972 rekindled memories of Edmund Duffy. Born in Sandy Springs, and educated at the University of Maryland and Stanford, Lane gladly gave up a business career at General Electric to earn his living with pen and brush.His outrageous expressions of outrage both provoke and exhilarate the newspaper's patrons, and keep his editors busy defending him. His political genesis was in the anti-war movements of the 1960s, an apt basis for a cartoonist's urge to protest greed, hypocrisy and inhumanity.
TOPIC
December 5, 1999
Credits : Cartoons by McKee Barclay, Thomas Barclay, Duffy, Yardley and Flannery courtesy of the Milton S. Eisenhower Library of Johns Hopkins University, Hamilton Street Club, Mike Lane and Sun Archives.
FEATURES
By Michael Pakenham | October 18, 1998
Sun staff writers continue to publish books: Three new ones are coming on the market. Following our established practice, they are listed here in alphabetical order, without critical judgment except to record that all of us at The Sun wish the books and their authors the success they unquestionably deserve."
NEWS
June 23, 1997
Let's not stigmatize minimum-wage jobsStephanie Shapiro's article, ''Helping kids who are parents," (June 8), was uplifting and enlightening. I applaud Rosetta Stith's tireless efforts; she seems dedicated to motivating teen mothers.However, I found one statement in the article highly disturbing, especially considering the nation's push towards self-sufficiency via welfare reform. While teenage mothers, the majority of whom receive temporary cash assistance, are being encouraged to be self-sufficient, they are also being brain-washed into believing that minimum-wage jobs are not valid forms of employment.
NEWS
October 19, 1994
Cynical SauerbreyLast month, New Jersey Gov. Christine Whitman was down here to serve as wanna-be Maryland Gov. Ellen Sauerbrey's object lesson: You can slash state taxes and thrive.A week later, Mrs. Whitman's rush to cut taxes has slowed to a crawl -- because the state's budget can't handle any more grand gestures.Is anyone out there surprised? More important, are the Maryland voters, whose mouths water at the mention of a tax cut, paying attention?If not, are they making a list of the public services they are willing to see cut along with their taxes?
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | August 22, 1993
The mail piles up, from readers and weeders:Dear Dirt,I have always pictured you as one of trim build, firm of flesh, tanned and supple from hours of outdoor exercise and healthy exertion. Frankly, from the illustrations that accompany your column, I am shocked to see what has become of you.I hope you take stock and set some vegetables aside instead of trying to eat them all on the spot.I pray that Mike Lane, with his customary ebullient style, has exaggerated a bit!Joel HuttonBaltimoreYou should see how I draw Mike Lane.
NEWS
June 23, 1997
Let's not stigmatize minimum-wage jobsStephanie Shapiro's article, ''Helping kids who are parents," (June 8), was uplifting and enlightening. I applaud Rosetta Stith's tireless efforts; she seems dedicated to motivating teen mothers.However, I found one statement in the article highly disturbing, especially considering the nation's push towards self-sufficiency via welfare reform. While teenage mothers, the majority of whom receive temporary cash assistance, are being encouraged to be self-sufficient, they are also being brain-washed into believing that minimum-wage jobs are not valid forms of employment.
TOPIC
December 5, 1999
Like his colleague, Mike Lane, Kevin Kallaugher won his job as a Baltimore Sun cartoonist by sending in a portfolio in 1988 that immediately caught an editor's eye.He was already on his way to an international reputation by reason of his work as chief illustrator for the Economist magazine of London. But he wanted a voice in the politics and mores of his native America and decided to embark on an unusual trans-Atlantic career: Daily cartooning in Baltimore, weekly illustrations (including covers)
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF | October 25, 1992
From Sept. 1 to Oct. 20, The Sun's cartoonist KAL blasted George Bush 7 times while The Evening Sun's Mike Lane hit Mr. Bush 17 times and Dan Quayle twice. They virtually ignored Bill Clinton.According to this informal count, Kevin Kallaugher (KAL) knocked Mr. Clinton and Mr. Bush together twice and all candidates once while Mr. Lane skewered Mr. Clinton once. The artists ridiculed Ross Perot four times.Welcome to the world of the political cartoonist.If you're looking for balance in the normal sense, you won't find it here or in cartoons on other big papers.
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