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NEWS
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2005
Uhhh, Beavis? What, Butt-head? Like, we're on a DVD. That's cool. For the first time, an extensive collection of Beavis and Butt-head animated shorts has been released on DVD, showing TV's stupidest teenagers to be even stupider than we remember. They get tattooed by an escaped serial killer. They set cats on fire. They cut down trees they're supposed to prune. Beavis and Butt-head were the poster boys for the degradation of American culture in the 1990s, but the genius of the show, one of the highest rated to run on MTV, was that it made fun of the very people who made it a hit. The show mocked the disaffected teenagers who did nothing more with their lives than watch television.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Noah Copeland and Chris Swain were stretching together during a practice early last week when Navy coach Ken Niumatalolo approached his top two fullbacks with a little pep talk. "Coach Niumat kind of called us out, told us we need to show up," Copeland recalled this week. "We kind of talked about that in the hotel [on Friday before facing Toledo], that we need to ball this game, and they're going to probably need us. We went out there with a different mentality. We just kept running and doing what we could do. " By the time Copeland and Swain were finished, they had combined for more yards in a game than any pair of Navy fullbacks in three seasons.
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 19, 1999
Imagine a live-action version of "Dilbert," or "In the Company of Men" reconceived as a lighthearted romp, and you get the idea of "Office Space," the auspicious live-action debut of Mike Judge.Judge is best known for such animated creations as Beavis, Butt-head and Hank Hill ("King of the Hill"), but he proves just as observant and funny in his first foray into the world of three-dimensional characters in this modest comedy of corporate manners.The quiet humor of "Office Space" becomes clear in its first scene, in which Peter (Ron Livington)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | September 11, 2009
Extract : *** ( 3 STARS) Movies disappear quickly if they don't score at the box office the first day, so lovers of American comedy should dash out this weekend to erase the disappointing opening weekend of "Extract," the highly enjoyable new workplace comedy by Mike Judge ("Office Space"). No recent film has a saner view of the tensions among workers and management. Jason Bateman and Ben Affleck are both hilarious as, respectively, the righteous owner of a flavor-extract company and the bartender buddy who has bad ideas about how to improve his friend's marital life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 17, 2005
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory [Warner] $29 Roald Dahl's popular fantasy about a little boy who wins a tour through a famous candy factory operated by eccentric Willie Wonka gets the Tim Burton spin. Burton favorite Johnny Depp stars as Wonka. Extras on the two-disc set include a cheeky documentary on training the squirrels, a sweet look at the life of Dahl, featuring interviews with his grandchildren, several interactive games and activities -- "The Oompa-Loompa Dance Machine," "Search for the Golden Ticket" -- five featurettes and an intriguing look at Deep Roy's task in playing all the Oompa-Loompas.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 17, 2003
The promoters of the flip, zesty, 94-minute anthology known only as The Animation Show promise, in their ads, "additional films and surprises." That might be a sure-fire marketing tool in a town overflowing with cartoon geeks, but in most cities they'd be better off letting their sleekest, blackest cat out of the bag. Tim Burton's oft-celebrated, rarely seen 1982 short Vincent is this show's chief "surprise." Though it runs a mere six minutes, it's enough to restore faith in Burton's talents after his herky-jerky Planet of the Apes.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | September 11, 2009
Extract : *** ( 3 STARS) Movies disappear quickly if they don't score at the box office the first day, so lovers of American comedy should dash out this weekend to erase the disappointing opening weekend of "Extract," the highly enjoyable new workplace comedy by Mike Judge ("Office Space"). No recent film has a saner view of the tensions among workers and management. Jason Bateman and Ben Affleck are both hilarious as, respectively, the righteous owner of a flavor-extract company and the bartender buddy who has bad ideas about how to improve his friend's marital life.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Noah Copeland and Chris Swain were stretching together during a practice early last week when Navy coach Ken Niumatalolo approached his top two fullbacks with a little pep talk. "Coach Niumat kind of called us out, told us we need to show up," Copeland recalled this week. "We kind of talked about that in the hotel [on Friday before facing Toledo], that we need to ball this game, and they're going to probably need us. We went out there with a different mentality. We just kept running and doing what we could do. " By the time Copeland and Swain were finished, they had combined for more yards in a game than any pair of Navy fullbacks in three seasons.
FEATURES
By Lara M. Zeises and Lara M. Zeises,SUN STAFF | August 2, 1997
I probably took the news better than most. Then again, most of those worshipping at the altar of "Beavis & Butt-head" are pre-pubescent boys. Like their heroes, they are probably utterly oblivious that anything has happened.But it's true. Come October, after 220 episodes, "Beavis & Butt-head" will be no more, the MTV network announced this week. Another American icon bites the dust, and I'm a little sad.Like a lot of MTV programming, "B&B" was geared toward males ages 12 to 18, not strong, intelligent feminist women like myself.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 28, 1997
There are milestones and then there are milestones in popular culture.Five years after the debut of two of our most controversial and cretinous television characters on MTV, the end arrives tonight for "Beavis and Butt-head."The finale -- titled "Beavis and Butt-head Are Dead" -- might not give you quite the same sense of loss as the last episode of "Cheers" or "M*A*S*H," but the crudely drawn cartoon about two repulsive teen-age boys with particularly annoying laughs is nevertheless landmark television in its own way.Many believe its popularity was telling us something about ourselves in the 1990s or, at least, something about male adolescence.
NEWS
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2005
Uhhh, Beavis? What, Butt-head? Like, we're on a DVD. That's cool. For the first time, an extensive collection of Beavis and Butt-head animated shorts has been released on DVD, showing TV's stupidest teenagers to be even stupider than we remember. They get tattooed by an escaped serial killer. They set cats on fire. They cut down trees they're supposed to prune. Beavis and Butt-head were the poster boys for the degradation of American culture in the 1990s, but the genius of the show, one of the highest rated to run on MTV, was that it made fun of the very people who made it a hit. The show mocked the disaffected teenagers who did nothing more with their lives than watch television.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 17, 2005
Charlie and the Chocolate Factory [Warner] $29 Roald Dahl's popular fantasy about a little boy who wins a tour through a famous candy factory operated by eccentric Willie Wonka gets the Tim Burton spin. Burton favorite Johnny Depp stars as Wonka. Extras on the two-disc set include a cheeky documentary on training the squirrels, a sweet look at the life of Dahl, featuring interviews with his grandchildren, several interactive games and activities -- "The Oompa-Loompa Dance Machine," "Search for the Golden Ticket" -- five featurettes and an intriguing look at Deep Roy's task in playing all the Oompa-Loompas.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 17, 2003
The promoters of the flip, zesty, 94-minute anthology known only as The Animation Show promise, in their ads, "additional films and surprises." That might be a sure-fire marketing tool in a town overflowing with cartoon geeks, but in most cities they'd be better off letting their sleekest, blackest cat out of the bag. Tim Burton's oft-celebrated, rarely seen 1982 short Vincent is this show's chief "surprise." Though it runs a mere six minutes, it's enough to restore faith in Burton's talents after his herky-jerky Planet of the Apes.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 19, 1999
Imagine a live-action version of "Dilbert," or "In the Company of Men" reconceived as a lighthearted romp, and you get the idea of "Office Space," the auspicious live-action debut of Mike Judge.Judge is best known for such animated creations as Beavis, Butt-head and Hank Hill ("King of the Hill"), but he proves just as observant and funny in his first foray into the world of three-dimensional characters in this modest comedy of corporate manners.The quiet humor of "Office Space" becomes clear in its first scene, in which Peter (Ron Livington)
FEATURES
By Newsday | October 20, 1993
MTV has moved its early evening showings of "Beavis and Butt-head" to a 10:30 p.m. time slot where young children presumably will not be watching.It's a move to which Beavis and Butt-head might respond with their trademark "Heh-heh. Heh-heh. Cool," since many youngsters stay up late anyway or know how to program their VCRs better than their parents do. The MTV move took effect last night.The cult cartoon series came under fire during the past two weeks, after an Ohio mother blamed Beavis and Butt-head's pyrotechnic hi-jinks (lighting fires and firecrackers)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 4, 2009
"Extract" is an exuberant original. This daft farce about a man who has founded and run a successful flavor extract company and lost the sexual attention of his wife is a workplace film like no other and one of the best comedies of the year. The film has sharper testicle jokes than all of the Judd Apatow gang's recent farces put together, a poolside seduction that's organic and uproarious, and a streak of stoner-slacker humor that's like repeated hits from a bong that's actually good for you. If those accolades have a primal ring to them, it's because writer-director Mike Judge, who a decade ago made the ultimate cubicle movie, "Office Space," brings the brains of a satirical biologist to his view of life on a bottling line and in all the office nooks and crannies - and trailer parks and upscale suburbs - surrounding it. If the movie doesn't surge with unabated potency like classic screwball comedy, it's got its own erratic snap, crackle and pop. And the ensemble (including Jason Bateman as company owner Joel Reynold and Kristen Wiig as his wife, Suzie)
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