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Mike Flanagan

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By Matt Vensel | August 25, 2011
Each morning, Monday through Friday, I'll hook you up with reading material to skim through as you slug down coffee and slack off at the start of your workday -- that way I'll have an excuse to do the same at the start of mine. Running it back: Former Orioles pitcher Mike Flanagan, a Cy Young Award winner who became a face of the franchise as a television announcer and top executive, died Wednesday afternoon . ... On a sad night in Birdland, Jeremy Guthrie, who wears Flanagan's No. 46, led the Orioles to a 6-1 win over the Twins . ... Lost in the difficult night for the Orioles is that Adam Jones left the game in the seventh inning . ... Bryant McKinnie passed his physical, and he says the Ravens will play him at left tackle . ... Maryland's early-season schedule will offer a reliable early indication of how good Mark Turgeon's men's basketball team is nationally . Hitting the links: 1. Richard Justice: Here's to Mike Flanagan, who was smart, funny and decent [ Houston Chronicle ]
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By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2013
When I was putting together my story on Earl Weaver after his death Friday night I knew I wanted to talk to Jim Henneman, the former Sun baseball beat writer and current Orioles official scorer who is our unofficial beat historian. All of us Sun writers look up to Henny and love hearing the stories of the Orioles' glory days. Henneman first met Weaver back in 1959 in Georgia at the Orioles' minor league camp. He covered Weaver throughout the Hall of Famer's big league managerial career.
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SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | August 25, 2011
Wednesday was a sad day in Birdland as Mike Flanagan, who wore many hats in the Orioles organization for four decades, was found dead at his Baltimore County home. The 1979 Cy Young Award winner was 59. During Wednesday night's Orioles game, I was moved by the response on Twitter from Flanny fans, many of whom reacted as if they had lost an uncle or a close family friend. Others shared their memories on our Orioles Insider blog . And many prominent national baseball writers -- including former Baltimore Sun scribes Buster Olney, Ken Rosenthal and Tim Kurkjian -- have since shared their stories about his sharp wit and warm heart .   In his 15 years with the Orioles, the New Hampshire native threw 98 complete games as he went 141-116 with a 3.89 ERA. He won a Cy Young, was an All-Star and helped the Orioles win the 1983 World Series.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 23, 2012
Many thanks for Dan Rodricks ' moving article on Mike Flanagan ("Shadows of doubt - the life and death of Mike Flanagan," Aug. 19). People who live and struggle with mental illness have to contend with the shadows caused by their brain disorder as well as the social stigma that isolates them from others and often delays or prevents them from getting treatment. I highly recommend the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) as a resource for people who have loved ones suffering from mental illness.
EXPLORE
August 25, 2011
Sitting in the press booth at Ripken Stadium on Wednesday night following Aberdeen's 4-2 loss to Connecticut, I was approached by the IronBirds' radio man and public relations chief, Towney Godfrey, who, according to post-game ritual, asked me which team members I'd like to interview. Still a bit fried from a chaotic week at the Ripken World Series, and feeling unsure about lobbing questions at a manager who'd just watched his team squander a very good ninth-inning opportunity to tie or possibly win the ballgame, I opted to skip a session with Aberdeen skipper Leo Gomez, and asked instead for players Matt Hobgood and Joe Velleggia.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 18, 2012
"Did you ever notice Mike when he came off the mound after a good inning?" asks Alex Flanagan, widow of the Orioles Hall-of-Famer who committed suicide a year ago. "He always had his head down. " That provokes a vivid memory of No. 46, the smart pitcher who studied all and fooled many of the 11,684 batters he faced over 18 major league seasons. He was the long-haired lefty with a mustache who won the American League Cy Young Award in the Orioles' 1979 World Series season. He was all business on the mound, and Alex is correct about Mike's demeanor during his walk to the dugout after most of his 2,770 innings: head down, serious, pondering what he had just done well or not so well.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2002
Mike Flanagan's journey through the Orioles' organization has taken him from the pitching mound to the coaches' office, and from the broadcast booth to the owner's ear. Now he's ready to get into the jewelry business. Sitting with reporters at the Camden Yards warehouse yesterday, Flanagan removed his World Series ring from his right hand and spun it on a table. He doesn't usually wear it, but the moment seemed right with his introduction as one half of the replacement for Syd Thrift, the club's outgoing vice president of baseball operations.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1998
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- The two left-handers struck an immediate bond in the fall of 1987. They had similar interests, similar deliveries, similar pitching philosophies. And on the final weekend of the '87 season, they became linked forever, losing, but losing with valor, losing with performances that ranked among the shining moments of their careers.Today, Mike Flanagan is 46, in his sixth year of retirement and his second stint as Orioles pitching coach. Jimmy Key is his No. 3 starter, almost 37, almost completely gray.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | September 27, 2011
A cold, steady rain mixed with snow had caused Game One of the 1979 World Series to be postponed. The following day, morning snow and afternoon rain had given way to a cold and damp evening, with the game time temperature 41 degrees. More than three hours later, it was considerably colder as Orioles pitcher Mike Flanagan and Pirates slugging first basemen Willie Stargell stared each other down with two outs in the ninth inning, their breath apparent in the chilled night air. The effect of the biting cold had been plainly evident in the combined six errors committed that night by two normally excellent defensive teams.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2005
IT'S AN INTRIGUING case study in baseball management. Two of this season's most surprising teams reside in our Beltway corridor. Both the Orioles and Washington Nationals are fading. Both could use heavy doses of momentum, and maybe a shot comes before today's 4 p.m. non-waiver trade deadline. That's for the respective general managers to decide - and they couldn't be more different in pursuing upgrades. What Washington's Jim Bowden and the Orioles' GM tandem of Jim Beattie and Mike Flanagan have in common is that they all are working on expiring contracts.
NEWS
August 22, 2012
In reading Dan Rodricks ' article, "Shadows of doubt - the life and death of Mike Flanagan" (Aug. 18), I was deeply touched not only by Mr. Rodricks' sensitivity and understanding of major depression but also of his love and caring for Mike Flanagan. I certainly was a fan of Mike Flanagan when he pitched at Memorial Stadium during the long hot summers in Baltimore and entertained his fans with his athleticism, ball control and professionalism. I later enjoyed his television baseball broadcasting.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 18, 2012
"Did you ever notice Mike when he came off the mound after a good inning?" asks Alex Flanagan, widow of the Orioles Hall-of-Famer who committed suicide a year ago. "He always had his head down. " That provokes a vivid memory of No. 46, the smart pitcher who studied all and fooled many of the 11,684 batters he faced over 18 major league seasons. He was the long-haired lefty with a mustache who won the American League Cy Young Award in the Orioles' 1979 World Series season. He was all business on the mound, and Alex is correct about Mike's demeanor during his walk to the dugout after most of his 2,770 innings: head down, serious, pondering what he had just done well or not so well.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | December 29, 2011
The sports website sbnation.com has ranked the Greatest Sportscasting Moments of 2011 and No. 1 was probably the hardest thing for Orioles fans to watch this year - maybe ever. The top moment for sbnation.com was Jim Palmer's touching, teary tribute to Mike Flanagan an hour or so after he learned that his good friend, ex-teammate and broadcast partner had committed suicide. The web site said Palmer, who was doing the color commentary that night for MASN, followed a “superhuman evening of broadcasting with a heartbreakingly human moment.” The site said Palmer's words and emotions reinforced the close relationship that viewers have with their broadcasters.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
Hands down: Mike Flanagan['s death] — J_O_S_H_U_A via Twitter Tim Tebow — Daniel Woldu via Facebook When the Dallas Mavericks beat the overrated Miami Heat in the NBA finals — Greg Durant via Facebook
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | September 27, 2011
A cold, steady rain mixed with snow had caused Game One of the 1979 World Series to be postponed. The following day, morning snow and afternoon rain had given way to a cold and damp evening, with the game time temperature 41 degrees. More than three hours later, it was considerably colder as Orioles pitcher Mike Flanagan and Pirates slugging first basemen Willie Stargell stared each other down with two outs in the ninth inning, their breath apparent in the chilled night air. The effect of the biting cold had been plainly evident in the combined six errors committed that night by two normally excellent defensive teams.
SPORTS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2011
Former Orioles pitcher Mike Flanagan had threatened to commit suicide several times before taking his life last month, police records show. In an interview with police detectives, Flanagan's wife described several occasions in which he grabbed a shotgun and walked outside their Sparks home, declaring, "I can't take it anymore. " Each time, Alex Flanagan said, she talked her 59-year-old husband back inside. The account adds to an emerging picture of Flanagan as a troubled man who was struggling with his career and finances and had grappled with suicidal thoughts.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2003
PHOENIX - It only rains about 30 days a year here in the Valley of the Sun, which is why Orioles vice president Mike Flanagan was having a good chuckle Wednesday, as he sat beneath the awning at the Arizona Biltmore hotel, watching a downpour. "We should have known," Flanagan said. "It's the Beattie factor." Orioles executive vice president Jim Beattie just shook his head. The teasing continued as Flanagan began summing up Beattie's first year in Baltimore: two big February snowstorms, a snow delay on Opening Day at Camden Yards, Tropical Storm Isabel.
NEWS
August 30, 2011
A sad, sad day in Birdland upon learning of the death of Mike Flanagan. Another link to the lost Oriole Way has left us all too soon. Mr. Flanagan was everything we Orioles fans loved about our Birds in those wonderful years of "Oriole Magic. " Tough, gritty, determined and a gamer. Rest in peace, Flanny. Allen Baker, Baltimore
NEWS
August 29, 2011
The death of Mike Flanagan has had a profound effect on me, more than I can rationalize. Like many of us, I am at a loss to understand what happened in his life that led to this terrible tragedy. I am a lifelong, big-time Oriole fan and, with my dad, attended the first game at Memorial Stadium in 1954 when I was nine years old. I kept a daily scrapbook with the Sun box scores and game stories and listened to most games on a boxy radio I kept near my bed. I was also at the last game at Memorial Stadium when Mike, then a reliever, fittingly threw the last pitch by an Oriole at the stadium.
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