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By Los Angeles Times | July 20, 1991
Greg LeMond, who rode a masterful race through the first half of the Tour de France, now faces his most difficult challenge since 1989, when he overcame France's Laurent Fignon on the final day.LeMond, from Wayzata, Minn., was left struggling a kilometer from the top of the Col du Tourmalet, the highest point of the Tour as he "cracked and paid the price."The damage was inflicted by Italian rival Claudio Chiappucci, who set a blistering pace up the 6,935-foot peak known as the Toit du Tour, or Roof of the Tour.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 10, 1996
GAP, France -- By 11: 30 a.m. yesterday, when the Tour de France left Turin, Italy, the temperature was in the 70s and the forecast for the next two days called for more sun and more heat.For Miguel Indurain, this marked the real start of the Tour, in which he is seeking his sixth successive victory. The Spaniard flourishes in the sun and wilts in the cold, the rain and the snow in which the race has been run so far.At long last, the sun. No wonder then that Indurain looked enthusiastic when he arrived with the rest of the Banesto team at the sign-in for the Tour's 10th stage, 129 miles from Turin to Gap.He was not alone in his jubilation.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 10, 1996
GAP, France -- By 11: 30 a.m. yesterday, when the Tour de France left Turin, Italy, the temperature was in the 70s and the forecast for the next two days called for more sun and more heat.For Miguel Indurain, this marked the real start of the Tour, in which he is seeking his sixth successive victory. The Spaniard flourishes in the sun and wilts in the cold, the rain and the snow in which the race has been run so far.At long last, the sun. No wonder then that Indurain looked enthusiastic when he arrived with the rest of the Banesto team at the sign-in for the Tour's 10th stage, 129 miles from Turin to Gap.He was not alone in his jubilation.
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By Susan Bickelhaupt and Susan Bickelhaupt,Boston Globe | July 24, 1995
PARIS -- This was supposed to go down in the history books as a spectacular win for Miguel Indurain in the Tour de France -- making him the only rider to capture the race five times in a row. But it will be remembered for another reason, too: as the year a rider crashed and died.The death last Tuesday of Italy's Fabio Casartelli seemed to suck all the pomp and circumstance out of the 82-year-old race that has become known as the most prestigious cycling event in the world.But the Tour did retain enough pageantry yesterday for thousands of spectators to line the Champs-Elysees and welcome the racers who had been riding about 100 miles every day for the past three weeks.
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By Susan Bickelhaupt and Susan Bickelhaupt,Boston Globe | July 24, 1995
PARIS -- This was supposed to go down in the history books as a spectacular win for Miguel Indurain in the Tour de France -- making him the only rider to capture the race five times in a row. But it will be remembered for another reason, too: as the year a rider crashed and died.The death last Tuesday of Italy's Fabio Casartelli seemed to suck all the pomp and circumstance out of the 82-year-old race that has become known as the most prestigious cycling event in the world.But the Tour did retain enough pageantry yesterday for thousands of spectators to line the Champs-Elysees and welcome the racers who had been riding about 100 miles every day for the past three weeks.
SPORTS
July 24, 1991
L'ALPE D'HUEZ, France (AP) -- Greg LeMond's reign at the Tour de France appears to be nearing an end.The three-time champion fell further behind leader Miguel Indurain after yesterday's famed 78-mile stage through the Alps. With just five stages to go in the 22-stage race, LeMond remained fifth overall -- 6 minutes, 39 seconds behind the leader.LeMond, who usually excels in the mountains, finished 14th in the stage that began in Gap -- 1:58 behind stage winner Gianni Bugno of Italy.Indurain, meanwhile, strengthened his grip on the yellow jersey by finishing behind Bugno, with Luc Leblanc of France third.
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By Knight-Ridder | July 24, 1991
L'ALPE D'HUEZ, France -- Greg LeMond's drive for a fourth Tour de France title all but ended yesterday on the soul-draining climb up l'Alpe d'Huez, the dragon stage of this race.The exhausted, foot-swollen American cyclist lost a critical two minutes during the 79-mile stage that wound through a crowd of more than 200,000 to a summit finish line at 6,100 feet in the Alps.LeMond remained in fifth place after 17 of the 22 stages in the 2,200-mile race. He is six minutes, 39 seconds behind Spain's Miguel Indurain, the tour leader with five days left.
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July 13, 1992
LUXEMBOURG -- The Tour de France keeps moving around, jumping from one country to another. However, the contenders remain the same.After the eighth stage finished at Koblenz, Germany, the cycling race made a quick jump to Luxembourg last night for today's time trial as all the contenders jockeyed for position.Three-time champion Greg LeMond, 1991 winner Miguel Indurain and world champion Gianni Bugno kept one eye on the route and one on each other during yesterday's eighth stage, and more of the same was expected in today's 41-mile time trial.
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By Bonnie DeSimone and Bonnie DeSimone,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 5, 2004
CHARLEROI, Belgium - This year more than ever, the first part of the Tour de France belongs to the sprinters. With the exception of Wednesday's team time trial, this week's finishes are built for the specialists who use their fast-twitch muscles and considerable nerve to go into handlebar-to-handlebar combat at the end of a flat stage. And there are fewer chances than in previous years for them to win toward the race's end. Davis Phinney, the sprinter and first U.S. rider to win a Tour stage in 1986, calls the homestretch of a sprint a "vortex ... where you're going at maximum velocity, but you have to slow things down."
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By Samuel Abt | July 23, 1991
GAP, France -- By word and deed, Greg LeMond did his best yesterday to dispel the rumors about his health. With a stunning second place in a sprint finish and a gain of 26 seconds on the leader of the race, LeMond managed to sway a few people.He was far less successful with his words. "I'm feeling normal, a little tired but looking forward to seeing what happens," he said this morning before the Tour de France began its third and last transition stage between the Pyrenees and the Alps.But his comments did not stop the speculation about the American rider, who is seeking his third consecutive victory in the world's greatest bicycle race.
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By Los Angeles Times | July 20, 1991
Greg LeMond, who rode a masterful race through the first half of the Tour de France, now faces his most difficult challenge since 1989, when he overcame France's Laurent Fignon on the final day.LeMond, from Wayzata, Minn., was left struggling a kilometer from the top of the Col du Tourmalet, the highest point of the Tour as he "cracked and paid the price."The damage was inflicted by Italian rival Claudio Chiappucci, who set a blistering pace up the 6,935-foot peak known as the Toit du Tour, or Roof of the Tour.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | July 1, 1995
It's an animated evening for kids on ABC, while U.S. history gets some attention -- semi-fictional on "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" and rigidly factual on a new cable documentary about the American Revolution.* "ABC's Wide World of Sports" (4:30 p.m.-6 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Although not deemed a favorite to win the overall title, rising U.S. rider Lance Armstrong could make his mark in individual stages of the Tour de France bicycle race. "Wide World of Sports" will devote three weekends of same-day coverage to the event, which begins today.
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By Phil Hersh and Phil Hersh,Chicago Tribune | July 18, 1991
On his only day off during the 23 days of the Tour de France, Greg LeMond took a hard two-hour bicycle ride in the foothills of the Pyrenees Mountains."
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