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NEWS
By Clark Brill | September 6, 2011
My father would tell me that the earliest milestone to discern an approaching autumn was not the obvious leaf-color change but the slightly cooler temperatures of late August and early September mornings. It was not the daytime afternoon temperature, which could be the same as a midsummer July afternoon, but just the morning coolness. I have come to learn there is another telltale sign of fall - an annual migration of sorts. Not the common Canada goose migration, which is pretty enough in its own right, but a sometimes less-attractive American college student migration.
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NEWS
By Robert Blecker | October 3, 2014
The root cause of undocumented immigration, whether from Mexico or Central America, is the poverty and lack of economic opportunity that have afflicted those nations as a result of failed economic policies - including their trade agreements with the United States. Those thousands of migrants - including unaccompanied minors - arriving at our border are not criminals trying to break the law. They are a warning sign that the collateral damage of so-called "free trade" agreements cannot always be found in closed factories and shuttered Main Street businesses in the United States.
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FEATURES
By Michael Walsh and Michael Walsh,Universal Press Syndicate | June 2, 1991
Home decorating styles, like life itself, evolve over time to reflect changing tastes, circumstances and cultural influences. That's what accounts for mounting interest in the west-by-northwest migration of one of the most popular and enduring design trends of recent years, generically known as Southwest style.Brewing for some time, a home-on-the-range renaissance and a revival of interest in furnishings, art, objects and artifacts associated with America's original cowboy-and-Indian and pioneer-and-prospector era is only now beginning to find widespread expression.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
I could see the headline as soon as I saw the tweet: NPR reports orioles leaving Baltimore. But given Baltimore's history, that would be too much. There's no trifling with teams leaving Baltimore. And we aren't talking about the team, though what a scoop that would be for NPR. This report is in relation to the birds themselves. According to a report on NPR's Morning Edition this morning , a National Audubon Society study says migratory patterns for birds have changed so much due to global warming that the Baltimore region could soon be without the Baltimore oriole, a black and orange bird that symbolizes its baseball club.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE | July 14, 2006
Biologists studying pronghorn antelope in Wyoming are calling for measures to protect what they say is the longest remaining migration route used by any mammal in the continental United States. Beginning in October each year, as many as 300 antelope leave their summer feeding and fawning areas in Grand Teton National Park, and walk more than 175 miles to lower winter grazing land between Pinedale and Rock Springs in southwest Wyoming. From March to June, they follow the same route in reverse, part of it crossing high mountains and threading narrow canyons.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2002
The Snow Geese, by William Fiennes. Random House. 288 pages. $24.95. This is one man's story about finding his way home. No, wait, it's about how birds find their way home. Truth be told, it's both: the story of how an Englishman follows geese from their winter sanctuary in southern Texas to their breeding grounds in northern Canada and in the process discovers what Dorothy said on the silver screen more than 60 years ago - there's no place like home. William Fiennes' first book, is an unusual breed, a part-travelogue, part-bird book that almost works to perfection.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | November 3, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- As another October faded, there was a new look to the afternoon light. On a couple of mornings there had been a touch of frost, and the nights were filled with the sound of migratory geese. On an autumnal migration of my own, I set out in my old wooden boat for the Eastern Shore.It's a migration which raises eyebrows in Havre de Grace. ''Denton? You're taking your boat to Denton for the winter? That's a hundred miles away!'' Well, it's about 103, actually, and at the rate the Sea Horse chugs, it's a 10-hour trip.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 13, 1995
BETHEL, N.Y. -- High above the tents and campfires and drum circles, where several thousand music lovers were celebrating the 26th anniversary of the original Woodstock festival, a gray banner bearing the grinning-skull logo of the Grateful Dead glowed against the night sky, illuminated by a flashlight.Its owner, Ronald De Graw, said he was letting the battery run down, allowing the symbol of his favorite band to fade into the darkness.It was something of a tribute to Jerry Garcia, the Grateful Dead's spiritual center and lead guitarist, who died Wednesday.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | March 18, 2009
Turning aside calls for a ban on the commercial harvest of horseshoe crabs, Maryland officials are imposing a new limit on the catch in an attempt to help shorebirds that migrate up the Atlantic coast in spring. Effective April 1, fishermen will be required to catch two male horseshoe crabs for every female they keep, the Department of Natural Resources said yesterday. The rule is designed to increase the availability of horseshoe crab eggs on mid-Atlantic beaches when migratory shorebirds arrive in May and June.
NEWS
November 18, 2000
THE YEARLY fall migration of the Monarch butterfly from North America to the balsam fir forests of Central Mexico, a 3,000-mile journey for millions of the creatures, is now ending. Welcoming the butterflies' arrival to winter quarters last week was a pioneering conservation agreement that triples their protected forest reserve to 140,000 acres and pays local farmers for their loss of logging rights. Over 30 years, about half the Monarch's high-altitude hibernating forest west of Mexico City has been lost to logging, threatening the species' viability.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
Chris Gleason walked outside early Tuesday to spend some time on his deck before heading to work, but he said he stopped dead in his tracks at the sight of an unexpected visitor: a black bear mere feet away. "As soon as I processed what it was, I was gone," said the 51-year-old Columbia resident, who lives in a subdivision just east of U.S. 29. "He was just standing there, not really doing anything. I knew it was time to get back into the house as soon as I could. " Gleason ran to get a camera, but the bear was gone when he got back, he said.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Federal wildlife officials announced Monday they have approved measures taken at Maryland's first industrial wind energy project to reduce the risk of spinning turbine blades killing endangered bats and birds. Exelon Generation, which owns and operates the 28-turbine Criterion wind project built in 2010 in Garrett County, has pledged to "feather" or reduce the rotation speed of its turbines' blades during nighttime from late summer to early fall, peak bat migration time. The company also has agreed to install a protective gate over a bat cave in a neighboring state as mitigation for its turbines possibly killing one or more Indiana bats.
BUSINESS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
Not long ago state officials in Maryland faced a technology roadblock that anyone who works at a private company would find quaint: There was no easy way to blast an email to the entire workforce. For an administration led by an early BlackBerry addict, the inability to quickly send government-wide emails in an emergency - or even to invite state employees to the executive mansion for the annual open house - was an odd holdover from an era before camera phones and touch screens. Now, roughly 54,000 state employees are switching to a cloud-based email and scheduling system provided by tech giant Google - making Maryland the largest state in the nation to rely on the ubiquitous search engine firm for email, calendars and document sharing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2013
To find out what she needed to discover about the life-changing matters that her parents didn't discuss, Isabel Wilkerson interviewed 1,200 people over 18 months. She re-created one man's harrowing 1,500-mile car trip from Louisiana to California. She picked cotton by hand. She visited quilting clubs, senior centers and hospitals, took bus trips and attended funerals. She scoured census data and tracked down 75-year-old research reports. It took her 15 years to finish "The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration," which picked up the National Book Critics Circle award for nonfiction.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
The new giant Pacific octopus at the National Aquarium in Baltimore had a rough Monday morning commute. Before he even got on the road, he turned from pink to dark red as he was placed into a plastic bag full of water, then into a white plastic foam container and cardboard box marked "Live Fish" for his trip to Baltimore from the smaller National Aquarium in downtown Washington, which closed forever last week to make room for building renovations....
BUSINESS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2012
We had a big wasps' nest last summer. We were told that it's safe to remove the nest after frost, but we still see wasps. When will they be gone? It takes a hard freeze to kill the worker wasps. They die, and the newly mated queens abandon the nest and winter elsewhere. In the spring they start a new hive somewhere else. No wasps will reuse an old hive. Wasps, as well as yellow jackets and European hornets, all behave this way. This fall has been mild. When normal winter temperatures kick in, you won't see wasps anymore.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | September 9, 1992
More Baltimore countians packed up and moved out during the 1980s than moved in, and planners say the search for jobs in the Sun Belt, and affordable houses with yards in neighboring counties were probably the major reasons."
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 12, 2002
Jewel-bright songbirds are nest-building now along the Patuxent River, at the end of their long migration. At Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary in Lothian, bird banders see more than a dozen of the 69 species that passed through the Texas woods this month. On a still, bright morning last week, the birders were surrounded by a tumult of birdsong. Elizabeth Sellers of Lorton, Va., singled out the songs of a half-dozen long-distance travelers, including a red-eyed vireo, whose trill is commonly translated as "Where are you?
NEWS
By Jim Pettit | December 19, 2012
For years, the right and left have been bickering in Maryland over whether or not people are coming or going, arguments that solved nothing, changed nothing and improved nothing. It's been a hot topic this year, with individual income tax hikes and proposals to raise the gasoline tax front and center on the policy agenda. The question is: At what point do high taxes drive people away to other states? "Virginia, here I come" is a popular refrain on social media posts on groups like Change Maryland's Facebook page, with 25,000 followers who have legitimate qualms about the state's relatively high corporate and individual income tax burdens.
NEWS
By Tamar Jacoby | July 1, 2012
The Supreme Court's immigration decision is a step back from the brink, leaving much less room than many expected for state immigration enforcement. Although the justices blocked most provisions of Arizona's controversial 2010 policing law, they upheld the one of most concern to immigrant rights advocates: the section that requires local police to inquire about the immigration status of people they stop for other reasons and whom they suspect are in the country illegally. Even this part of the opinion is more tenuous than many expected, leaving open the possibility of future reconsideration by the court.
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