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NEWS
By James Bock | July 12, 1991
After a decade of peeling shrimp in a Mexican packing plant for as little as $5 a day, Gloria Osuna Osuna seized the chance to come to Maryland's Eastern Shore.Her U.S. employers, she says, offered her a job picking crab meat that would net her $250 a week after food and lodging expenses. She says she was promised a bed in an air-conditioned house with television and a laundry room.But when she arrived for work May 18 at Philip J. Harrington & Son Inc., a seafood-packing plant in the little Dorchester County town of Secretary, Ms. Osuna says, found she would share a flea-ridden, one-bedroom house with a dozen Mexican workers.
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NEWS
March 10, 2014
Maryland's House Bill 295 includes a gradual increase in state minimum wage, bringing the wage up from the current $7.25 per hour to eventually reach $10.10 per hour in 2017 ( "House votes to raise Maryland's minimum wage," March 7). The Sun's recent editorial on the bill ( "Partial victory for the working poor," March 5) criticizes its elimination of wage indexing as well as the lack of protection it offers to tipped workers whose wages remain at $3.63 per hour. However, the piece fails to mention another group of workers who are harmed by the bill: low-wage seasonal workers in Maryland.
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NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Staff Writer | September 1, 1992
MIAMI -- When relief crews rushed out to help the victims of Hurricane Andrew, the migrant farm workers of Everglades Labor Camp were among the last to be remembered. When the effort slackens, they'll likely be among the first forgotten.But for now, at least, the migrant workers are pretty much like everybody else living in south Dade County in the wake of the storm. They scrounge for food, water and medical supplies. They sleep in leaky, torn homes. And they suffer amid growing mounds of garbage and burgeoning populations of rats, mosquitoes and stray dogs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Edward V.C. Nicol, a retired Social Security Administration public affairs representative who earned the name of "Mr. Meals on Wheels" for his more than three decades of volunteer work, died Jan. 13 of pneumonia at the Presbyterian Home of Maryland in Towson. The longtime Rodgers Forge resident was 96. The son of Presbyterian missionaries, Edward Van Cleve Nicol was born in Minneapolis while his parents were on furlough from their mission work in Beirut. In 1918, Mr. Nicol and his family returned to Beirut, where he graduated from the American Community School in 1934.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2005
HOOPERS ISLAND - Anyone looking for a fiesta - make that FIESTA! - need search no farther than this narrow strip of marshy waterfront that is the summer home of Mexican women who do the dirty work in Maryland's seafood industry. It's been 2 1/2 months of monotonous labor since they arrived on the Eastern Shore in June, bleary from a four-day bus trip that began in the small mountain village of Palomas and other towns in central Mexico. Like the workers in a dozen or so packing houses on the island, the women at Charles H. Parks and Co. have already picked mountains of crabmeat this summer, averaging 400 pounds a day packaged under the Capt.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 4, 1998
I sat down in front of the television set wanting to be impressed by "Children of the Fields," an NBC documentary on child migrant workers airing tonight. Honest I did.On Thanksgiving Day, 1960, CBS aired "Harvest of Shame," a documentary on migrant workers produced by Fred Friendly and reported by Edward R. Murrow. In its understanding of the complex issues involved and willingness to confront the powers-that-be in seeking answers, the report defined network television news as social conscience and set a tone that carried into the exemplary civil rights reporting by CBS and NBC in the 1960s.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2003
CARLSBAD, Calif. - This city's old secrets live in the canyons. The Latino migrant workers who pick fruit and vegetables in this oceanside city used to reside quietly in temporary, ramshackle huts during the warm months, and many would disappear south of the border during the winter. In either case, few people paid attention to them. But the city tore down the huts this year because, officials say, waste from the workers' encampment was washing into a lagoon and polluting it. The men were forced to find other housing, and many settled in hastily built tents in roadside canyons, setting off a racially tinged argument about workers' rights.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2005
HOOPERS ISLAND - The nimble fingers of Consuelo Morales, 52, were flying through what looked like mountains of steamed crabs piled high on stainless steel tables. Gripping her paring knife, she ripped away shell after shell to dig out fluffy white lumps, deftly flicking the crab meat - the Chesapeake's most prized bounty - into plastic "Capt. Charlie" brand containers. After months of uncertainty, Morales and a dozen other veterans from central Mexico were back at work yesterday in a crab-packing plant in this swampy corner of Maryland's Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 22, 2000
BOSTON - To the three Mexican migrant workers, the restaurant's name seemed inviting: Poncho's Cantina. The Auburn, Maine, restaurant's menu listed homeland favorites such as enchiladas, tacos, burritos. So they entered, yearning for a little cultural kinship. But Victor Estrada, Omar Gonzalez and Christo Gutierrez never got to order. They say the owner chastised them for speaking Spanish. She denies the accusation. "She slapped the bar with her hand and said, `If you're going to be here, you have to speak in English because this is my place,'" Estrada said in English.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2003
SALISBURY - Lazaro Ramirez-Flores traveled a long way to be unemployed. "I came up here because I thought there would be work," said the native of Oaxaca, Mexico, who journeyed more than 4,000 miles to pick watermelons in Maryland. "But there's nothing to do here except sleep and worry." Thousands of migrant workers up and down the East Coast are in as much trouble as Ramirez-Flores. Almost 30 inches of rain have fallen in Salisbury this year, almost four inches more than normal. The heavy rains have stunted many crops, especially melons and tomatoes, and the work season has been pushed back as much as three weeks.
EXPLORE
July 26, 2011
Editor: "Illegal aliens," "undocumented workers," "unwanted immigrants" and a host of other monikers have been given to migrants to any country. The first settlers (illegal aliens) in the Mexican territories of Texas and California in the early and mid-1800s were not well received by the Mexican people either. Wars were fought and lands confiscated so this country could fulfill its "manifest destiny" of controlling all the land between the two oceans even though the land belonged to native Americans.
NEWS
July 4, 2011
I must say that I'm impressed with The Sun and the great wages it obviously must pay its employees. We have Michael Dresser who, for the last two weeks, has written several articles telling us how it's just dandy and about time that Maryland raised the tolls for all us poor folk. Never mind that most of these bridges and tunnels have been paid for several times over. What Mr. Dresser or some adventurous journalist should be doing is to finding out just how much money these tolls amount to, and then how much of that ends up paying for administrative bureaucracy.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 20, 2008
DIEPSLOOT, South Africa - The brutal apartheid era practice of setting opponents on fire has been revived in this country's crowded, litter-strewn shantytowns. But now the victims are foreign migrants. Anger over unemployment and rising prices and simmering resentment against illegal foreign migrants exploded into xenophobic violence in South Africa, with at least 22 people slain in the past 10 days. Hundreds more were injured and as many as 10,000 fled their homes, as analysts struggled for explanations.
NEWS
By Jenny Jarvie | June 10, 2007
Fort Valley, Ga. -- Food Depot is slower this summer. A hot, frazzled mother lingers in front of a tower of banana Moon Pies; a man in overalls counts change for a 77-cent bag of ice. Cashiers gossip, then sigh. They miss the Hispanics who loaded the checkout belts with flour tortillas, thick golden cornhusks and tamarind sodas. Nearly 80 percent of Georgia's peach crop was destroyed when a severe frost spread across the Southeast at Easter. Without peaches, the orchards clustered around this railroad town 80 miles south of Atlanta have little work for migrant laborers.
NEWS
By E. G. Vallianatos | February 22, 2007
The tale is familiar by now, but that makes it no less horrifying: Migrant men and women, most of them from Mexico and Central America - along with some poor blacks and whites from the United States - following the growing and harvest seasons, working hard for pitiful wages while enduring dangerous lives. In 1979, I was a new Environmental Protection Agency employee attending a government-funded seminar about the plight of farm workers. Expert after expert described conditions of horror.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | May 12, 2006
Joseph Mathew thought he was onto something back in February 2004. He didn't know the half of it. His first documentary, The Last Season: The Life and Demolition of Baltimore's Memorial Stadium (co-directed with Charles Cohen), had been a major hit at the 2002 Maryland Film Festival. Poking around in search of a subject for a new project, he traveled to the Arizona-Mexico border, his interest piqued by an international affairs course at New York University. He found his subject, little suspecting that by the time he finished the film, it would have become such a hot-button issue: illegal immigrants.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | November 25, 1990
Each fall, with the rows of trees in the nearby orchard barren, the small white house on Hughes Shop Road outside Westminster empties.From May until November, the house, trimmed in bright red, is home to about 20 workers who travel from Puerto Rico to work at Allan Baugher's orchard.By now, the workers are back in Puerto Rico, many of them drawing unemployment benefits and catching up with friends and family. Next spring, many will return to work for another season.Juan Ramos, 32, traveled that route for 14 years to pick fruit and vegetables at Baugher's.
NEWS
July 4, 2011
I must say that I'm impressed with The Sun and the great wages it obviously must pay its employees. We have Michael Dresser who, for the last two weeks, has written several articles telling us how it's just dandy and about time that Maryland raised the tolls for all us poor folk. Never mind that most of these bridges and tunnels have been paid for several times over. What Mr. Dresser or some adventurous journalist should be doing is to finding out just how much money these tolls amount to, and then how much of that ends up paying for administrative bureaucracy.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | September 27, 2005
SHANGHAI, China -- Huaihai Street is the fashion-conscious heart of China's New York City, where one huge high-end mall after another stocks every expensive brand from Europe, Asia and the United States. Halfway along the street is a three-story mall called China's Cybermarket. It is dedicated to electronics: every imaginable brand of computers, hand-held devices, cell phones, cameras and any other wired gizmo on the market. Morning, noon and evening, its floors are crowded with young Chinese trying out iPods and laptop computers, including IBM ThinkPads (the IBM personal computing division was recently acquired by Lenovo, a leading Chinese computer brand)
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,Sun foreign reporter | September 23, 2005
BEIJING -- It would seem a clear-cut case for any court of law: A migrant worker angry that he hasn't been paid goes on a rampage, stabbing to death a foreman and members of the foreman's family and then trying to kill a more senior boss. A court in northwest China quickly decided earlier this year that 27-year-old Wang Binyu should die for his crimes. But in the court of public opinion, many Chinese have surprisingly come to a different conclusion, stirring a national debate while a regional high court weighs whether to uphold the death sentence.
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