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Mighty Wind

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By Scott Eyman and Scott Eyman,COX NEWS SERVICE | September 25, 2003
Every couple of years, Christopher Guest pulls his faithful actors and crew together and makes a faux documentary focusing on the deluded members of some intrinsically American subculture. The reviews are great, the film disappears from theaters in a couple of weeks and reappears for its real audience on DVD. Guest has previously made Best in Show, about obsessive dog-lovers, and Waiting for Guffman, about small-town show biz wannabes, all riffing on Rob Reiner's classic, This is Spinal Tap. A Mighty Wind (to be released Tuesday)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2010
When Casey Wilson joined the cast of "Saturday Night Live," she became the first Not Ready For Prime-Time Player who was born in the 1980s. Here's are the movie comedies that meant the most to this member of Generation Y. "Clue" (1985): How nostalgic — a movie based not on a video game, but on the murder-mystery board game peopled with archetypal characters (Colonel Mustard, Reverend Green, Miss Scarlet) and peppered with old-fashioned weapons (rope, revolver, candlestick)
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FEATURES
By Moira Macdonald and Moira Macdonald,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 29, 2003
SEATTLE - Four actors sit around a table at the Four Seasons one afternoon, without a script in sight. But that's nothing new for director/actor Christopher Guest and actors Fred Willard, Harry Shearer and John Michael Higgins - they're accustomed to working without a script, on Guest's hilarious mockumentaries Waiting for Guffman, Best in Show and the new A Mighty Wind, all of which were improvised for the cameras. Not that there's nothing on paper. "The script looks like a script," explains Higgins (the exuberant shih tzu handler from Best in Show)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Swift | May 10, 2009
CONCERT The Shins : When The Shins return to Baltimore this week, fans will get the same sound, but pretty much a new band. Frontman James Mercer switched out his keyboardist and drummer this month. They say the move was drama-free, but it'll be interesting to see the results on stage. Show starts 8:30 p.m. Friday at Rams Head Live. More: ramsheadlive.com RACING The Preakness Stakes: Leave the Milwaukee's Best at home and bring your wallet. Baltimore's craziest outdoor party will go on this year, but you'll have buy your booze from concession stands.
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By Karen Heller and Karen Heller,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 11, 2003
NEW YORK - Eugene Levy, who possesses the movies' most terpsichorean eyebrows since Groucho Marx, likes to say that he could never be a leading man. Except in Turkey. Yet here it is August and the Canadian actor has just opened in American Wedding, his fourth movie of the year. Before that, there was Bringing Down the House, which Levy basically steals from Steve Martin and Queen Latifah; the egregious Dumb and Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd, though even here Levy attracted praise; and the sublime A Mighty Wind, which he co-wrote with director Christopher Guest, and which won Levy the reviews of his career.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2003
WASHINGTON - If - God forbid - the New Christy Minstrel Singers, the chirpiest of all '60s folk acts, ever decide to go on tour again, imagine the size of the crowds that would clamor to stay away. Yet their doubles, the New Main Street Singers, luminous in their signature yellow and blue outfits, were greeted the other night at Washington's sold-out 9:30 Club with squeals of delight and affection reserved only for the most beloved musical reunions. This was a reunion. Not only were the New Main Street Singers back together but so too were the ever earnest Folksmen and those folkie sweethearts, Mitch and Mickey, who once again smooched before an adoring crowd at the conclusion of "A Kiss At the End of the Rainbow," their paean to their own legendary romance.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 9, 2003
A Mighty Wind would be uproarious if the mock folk songs on the soundtrack were its only laugh-getters. They wed melodic and rhythmic zing to various types of soft-headed idealism and good-hearted sappiness - simultaneously pleasing and tickling the ear. But the folk singers themselves, and the people who surround them, set off similar eruptions, in tiny and broad ways. You find yourself howling every time Bob Balaban, as the fussy heir of a music promoter, goes into a fit over minutiae, or Fred Willard, as an ex-comedian who manages the New Main Street Singers, hits on a madcap inspiration like drenching the group members in water as they sing a sea chantey.
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2004
MOUNT WASHINGTON, N.H. - It took a precise blend of geography and weather, an exquisite cocktail of natural elements, to produce a gust of 231 mph. Call it the perfect wind. This world-record blast of air, set 70 years ago today, has withstood challenges from legions of hurricanes and typhoons. It is the bedrock of a reputation that allows 6,288-foot Mount Washington to boast, "Home of the World's Worst Weather." "It had to happen somewhere, but that it happened where it did surprises people," says Bryan Yeaton, the folksy host of the nationally syndicated radio show The Weather Notebook.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Timberg and Scott Timberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 8, 2003
HOLLYWOOD - Since the dawn of time, music has been written to stir, to celebrate, to make its performer seem potent or wise. One way or the other, it's meant to be good. But for a handful of musicians and songwriters during the past three decades, many of them working in film, the task has been to create something awful, even ridiculous. From the forced psychedelic poetry of the Rutles, an affectionate Beatles parody that animated a 1978 mock documentary, to the flamboyant bombast of Spinal Tap, a fake heavy-metal band that powered a 1984 film, to the soulless tunes of the white-blues band Blues Hammer in 2001's Ghost World, this is music designed to be banal instead of imaginative, hackneyed instead of fresh.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2010
When Casey Wilson joined the cast of "Saturday Night Live," she became the first Not Ready For Prime-Time Player who was born in the 1980s. Here's are the movie comedies that meant the most to this member of Generation Y. "Clue" (1985): How nostalgic — a movie based not on a video game, but on the murder-mystery board game peopled with archetypal characters (Colonel Mustard, Reverend Green, Miss Scarlet) and peppered with old-fashioned weapons (rope, revolver, candlestick)
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2004
MOUNT WASHINGTON, N.H. - It took a precise blend of geography and weather, an exquisite cocktail of natural elements, to produce a gust of 231 mph. Call it the perfect wind. This world-record blast of air, set 70 years ago today, has withstood challenges from legions of hurricanes and typhoons. It is the bedrock of a reputation that allows 6,288-foot Mount Washington to boast, "Home of the World's Worst Weather." "It had to happen somewhere, but that it happened where it did surprises people," says Bryan Yeaton, the folksy host of the nationally syndicated radio show The Weather Notebook.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Eyman and Scott Eyman,COX NEWS SERVICE | September 25, 2003
Every couple of years, Christopher Guest pulls his faithful actors and crew together and makes a faux documentary focusing on the deluded members of some intrinsically American subculture. The reviews are great, the film disappears from theaters in a couple of weeks and reappears for its real audience on DVD. Guest has previously made Best in Show, about obsessive dog-lovers, and Waiting for Guffman, about small-town show biz wannabes, all riffing on Rob Reiner's classic, This is Spinal Tap. A Mighty Wind (to be released Tuesday)
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2003
WASHINGTON - If - God forbid - the New Christy Minstrel Singers, the chirpiest of all '60s folk acts, ever decide to go on tour again, imagine the size of the crowds that would clamor to stay away. Yet their doubles, the New Main Street Singers, luminous in their signature yellow and blue outfits, were greeted the other night at Washington's sold-out 9:30 Club with squeals of delight and affection reserved only for the most beloved musical reunions. This was a reunion. Not only were the New Main Street Singers back together but so too were the ever earnest Folksmen and those folkie sweethearts, Mitch and Mickey, who once again smooched before an adoring crowd at the conclusion of "A Kiss At the End of the Rainbow," their paean to their own legendary romance.
FEATURES
By Karen Heller and Karen Heller,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 11, 2003
NEW YORK - Eugene Levy, who possesses the movies' most terpsichorean eyebrows since Groucho Marx, likes to say that he could never be a leading man. Except in Turkey. Yet here it is August and the Canadian actor has just opened in American Wedding, his fourth movie of the year. Before that, there was Bringing Down the House, which Levy basically steals from Steve Martin and Queen Latifah; the egregious Dumb and Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd, though even here Levy attracted praise; and the sublime A Mighty Wind, which he co-wrote with director Christopher Guest, and which won Levy the reviews of his career.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 9, 2003
A Mighty Wind would be uproarious if the mock folk songs on the soundtrack were its only laugh-getters. They wed melodic and rhythmic zing to various types of soft-headed idealism and good-hearted sappiness - simultaneously pleasing and tickling the ear. But the folk singers themselves, and the people who surround them, set off similar eruptions, in tiny and broad ways. You find yourself howling every time Bob Balaban, as the fussy heir of a music promoter, goes into a fit over minutiae, or Fred Willard, as an ex-comedian who manages the New Main Street Singers, hits on a madcap inspiration like drenching the group members in water as they sing a sea chantey.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Timberg and Scott Timberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 8, 2003
HOLLYWOOD - Since the dawn of time, music has been written to stir, to celebrate, to make its performer seem potent or wise. One way or the other, it's meant to be good. But for a handful of musicians and songwriters during the past three decades, many of them working in film, the task has been to create something awful, even ridiculous. From the forced psychedelic poetry of the Rutles, an affectionate Beatles parody that animated a 1978 mock documentary, to the flamboyant bombast of Spinal Tap, a fake heavy-metal band that powered a 1984 film, to the soulless tunes of the white-blues band Blues Hammer in 2001's Ghost World, this is music designed to be banal instead of imaginative, hackneyed instead of fresh.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Swift | May 10, 2009
CONCERT The Shins : When The Shins return to Baltimore this week, fans will get the same sound, but pretty much a new band. Frontman James Mercer switched out his keyboardist and drummer this month. They say the move was drama-free, but it'll be interesting to see the results on stage. Show starts 8:30 p.m. Friday at Rams Head Live. More: ramsheadlive.com RACING The Preakness Stakes: Leave the Milwaukee's Best at home and bring your wallet. Baltimore's craziest outdoor party will go on this year, but you'll have buy your booze from concession stands.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 22, 2006
Director Christopher Guest and his stock company, who gave us Best in Show and A Mighty Wind, are such deft, humane comedians they put you in a happy daze even when they shred their characters' dreams. Their latest frolic, For Your Consideration, satirizes Hollywood awards frenzy -- and happily transcends its subject. It's about delusion and endurance. For Your Consideration (Warner Independent) Starring Catherine O' Hara, Harry Shearer, Parker Posey, John Michael Higgins, Eugene Levy, Fred Willard, Jane Lynch, Christopher Guest.
FEATURES
By Moira Macdonald and Moira Macdonald,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 29, 2003
SEATTLE - Four actors sit around a table at the Four Seasons one afternoon, without a script in sight. But that's nothing new for director/actor Christopher Guest and actors Fred Willard, Harry Shearer and John Michael Higgins - they're accustomed to working without a script, on Guest's hilarious mockumentaries Waiting for Guffman, Best in Show and the new A Mighty Wind, all of which were improvised for the cameras. Not that there's nothing on paper. "The script looks like a script," explains Higgins (the exuberant shih tzu handler from Best in Show)
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