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NEWS
October 13, 2005
President Bush's choice of Harriet Miers to replace retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor on the U.S. Supreme Court has set off a ferocious reaction and debate about her qualifications and views. Many "friends" of the administration are wondering aloud whether she's an ideological hard-liner or whether she's a closet moderate who would betray the conservative movement that put Mr. Bush in office. Whatever her views, it's her shallow qualifications that are most troubling. The drama is heightened because Justice O'Connor has played such a pivotal role on the court, often speaking for a 5-4 majority on issues such as abortion.
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NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 13, 2007
WASHINGTON -- House Democrats began laying the groundwork for finding former White House counsel Harriet E. Miers in contempt of Congress yesterday when, as expected, she did not appear at a congressional hearing on the firing of eight U.S. attorneys last year. In a party-line vote, a House judiciary subcommittee dismissed claims of executive privilege that Miers invoked through her lawyer in refusing to appear. The 7-5 vote was the first step in a process that could lead to Miers - who had been briefly nominated for the Supreme Court in 2005 - being found in contempt, although the timing of such a move was far from clear.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 21, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The briefing books are the same. The White House and Justice Department inquisitors are the same. Even the questions are largely the same: about abortion rights, the right to privacy and the 14th Amendment. The difference, of course, is that the lead character has changed, as has the political climate. Harriet E. Miers, the unobtrusive White House counsel who helped to run the so-called "murder boards" that prepared Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. for his Senate confirmation hearings, is now the one whose future life as a Supreme Court justice is at stake.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 13, 2007
WASHINGTON --The White House was deeply involved in the decision late last year to dismiss federal prosecutors, including some who had been criticized by Republican lawmakers, according to administration officials. In October, President Bush called Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales to pass along complaints among Republicans that prosecutors were not aggressively addressing voter fraud, the White House said yesterday. The president did not call for the removal of any specific U.S. attorneys, according to a White House spokesman, but the Justice Department forced out seven of them weeks later.
NEWS
By MAURA REYNOLDS and MAURA REYNOLDS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 25, 2005
WASHINGTON -- President Bush said yesterday that he would resist calls from Congress to release documents from Harriet E. Miers' White House service, setting up a possible standoff with senators over how much information they are entitled to know about his choice for the Supreme Court. Senators of both parties complain that Miers - who has held three White House jobs in the past five years, including counsel to the president - is largely unknown outside the White House. As a result, Republicans as well as Democrats have said they might not vote for her unless the White House voluntarily provides at least some materials that demonstrate her qualifications to sit on the nation's highest court.
NEWS
By NEWT GINGRICH | October 7, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Conservatives should feel confident with the selection of Harriet Miers to replace Sandra Day O'Connor on the Supreme Court for a simple reason: George W. Bush selected her. Much has been made in the press about conservative unhappiness with the White House on issues such as spending and immigration and most recently with the selection of Ms. Miers. However, while these tensions are not insignificant, the president has stayed remarkably true to conservative principles on every major decision he has made since winning the Republican primary.
NEWS
By ERWIN CHEMERINSKY | October 6, 2005
Harriet Miers is truly a stealth candidate for the Supreme Court, and senators must insist that unless she answers detailed questions about her views, she will not be confirmed. Unlike Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., who authored dozens of briefs and hundreds of memos on crucial issues, Ms. Miers apparently has little record on constitutional questions. The Senate cannot confirm Ms. Miers on blind faith that she will not be a vote to radically change the law in countless areas in which Justice Sandra Day O'Connor has been the crucial fifth vote.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 19, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court nomination of Harriet E. Miers appeared to gain some ground with Republicans and lose some with Democrats yesterday after she turned over to senators a 57-page background questionnaire and 12 boxes of supporting documents. Republicans who had expressed reservations about her nomination focused their attention on one of those pages: a 10-question survey dating to 1989 from Texans United for Life in which she said, as a candidate for the Dallas City Council, that she favored outlawing abortion except to save the life of a mother.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,SUN REPORTER | October 4, 2005
WASHINGTON -- When it comes to President Bush's latest Supreme Court pick, think Condi, not Cheney. Bush's surprise choice of Harriet E. Miers prompted commentators to note that she got her nomination in the way Vice President Dick Cheney got his. Both had been asked by Bush to screen candidates for the positions that he wound up giving to them instead. A better comparison, however, would be to Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, whose rise to the loftiest heights of Washington power offers striking parallels to Miers', as does her unquestioned loyalty to Bush.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 4, 2005
WASHINGTON - In May, the Texas Center for Legal Ethics and Professionalism gave Harriet E. Miers its second annual Sandra Day O'Connor Award. Yesterday, President Bush proposed Miers for something a little bit bigger: Sandra Day O'Connor's seat on the Supreme Court. The parallels to the woman she would succeed are apparent. Both were born in Texas. Both graduated at the top of their law school class, yet had trouble finding jobs. Both served in elective office, O'Connor in the Arizona state Senate and Miers a single two-year term on the Dallas City Council, but neither had been a federal judge.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 5, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Harriet E. Miers, a member of a diminishing circle of allies who came to Washington in 2001 with George W. Bush, is resigning as White House counsel at the end of this month, the White House announced yesterday. The ill-fated nomination of Miers to the Supreme Court in 2005 left President Bush tangled in complaints of cronyism and in dispute with his conservative allies. Her departure comes as the administration copes with the challenges of demonstrating its relevance during its final two years, with attention shifting to the new Democratic majorities in the House and Senate, and renewing its energy among senior aides for whom time in office is ticking away.
NEWS
By PAUL MOORE and PAUL MOORE,PUBLIC EDITOR | November 6, 2005
One of the most important challenges that newspaper editors face is being consistent in their judgment about the play of stories and photographs on the front page. The size and position of articles, the tone of the headlines and the structure of stories reflect a newspaper's philosophy - its news judgment. Readers will not always agree with the newspaper's choices, but if the editorial judgment is steady, most of them will feel that the decisions are carefully considered and the product of experience.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | November 4, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The reaction of conservatives to President Bush's nomination of federal appeals Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the Supreme Court has been so gleeful that friends and foes alike wonder why Mr. Bush did not choose him, rather than White House counsel Harriet Miers, in the first place. After all, here's a man who, like the easily confirmed Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., has scholarly credentials, long judicial experience and an agreeable manner. Some of the more paranoid voices I have heard wonder whether Ms. Miers might simply have been an innocent pawn in an evil, mean-spirited plot; she might have been set up to fail, poor darling, just so the president could shrug, smile and say, "Well, we tried," before nominating the conservative white guy that he wanted all along.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,SUN REPORTER | November 1, 2005
WASHINGTON -- At a crucial moment for his leadership, President Bush has picked a fight he was trying to avoid. Last month, Bush was deemed too weak politically to risk a pitched battle with Democrats as he fills the seat of retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. Now, after a failed Supreme Court nomination and the indictment of a senior White House aide, he has entered that fight after all. Republicans and Democrats say that Bush had little choice. "He decided to throw down the gauntlet on this one, which he clearly had to do to make his own party feel that there is something at stake here," said Anita Dunn, a Democratic campaign strategist.
NEWS
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | November 1, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Setting off a partisan clash over his effort to steer the Supreme Court to the right, President Bush chose a staunch conservative, federal appellate Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr., to replace the court's swing vote, retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. Republicans who helped sink Bush's previous choice enthusiastically endorsed yesterday's pick as top Democrats denounced Alito, 55, who during 15 years as a federal judge has issued consistently conservative opinions on a host of key constitutional questions, including his lone dissent in a landmark 1991 abortion-rights case.
NEWS
By GWYNETH K. SHAW and GWYNETH K. SHAW,SUN REPORTER | November 1, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Twice this year, Gabriela Lemus hoped to hear the news that President Bush had made history and chosen the first Hispanic nominee to the Supreme Court. Yesterday, her hopes were dashed again when Bush named Judge Samuel A. Alito Jr. - the son of an Italian immigrant - as his choice to fill the seat of retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. "Three strikes," said Lemus, national director of policy and legislation for the League of United Latin American Citizens, lamenting what she called another missed opportunity.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | October 11, 2005
WASHINGTON -- Hell hath no fury like a conservative scorned. Voices that only months ago were praising President Bush's single-minded resoluteness now call upon him to flip-flop. Within hours of his nomination of Harriet Miers to fill the U.S. Supreme Court seat being vacated by Sandra Day O'Connor, the right wing of the punditry pantheon opened with choruses of complaint. Their message, if I may paraphrase rapper Kanye West: George Bush doesn't care about right-wing people. Or, more precisely, he does not care enough about them to suit such conservative commentators as George Will, Rush Limbaugh, Patrick J. Buchanan, William Kristol, Charles Krauthammer, Paul Weyrich, Phyllis Schlafly and Ann Coulter.
NEWS
By RICHARD A. SERRANO and RICHARD A. SERRANO,AN OCT. 9 ARTICLE MISSTATED THE AGE OF MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY'S ATHLETIC DIRECTOR, FLOYD KERR. HE IS 58 | October 19, 2005
WASHINGTON -- As a candidate for the Dallas City Council in 1989, Harriet E. Miers characterized herself as opposed to abortion and assured a local advocacy group that she "actively supported" legislation to permanently outlaw the procedure should the Supreme Court ever overturn its decision in Roe v. Wade. Now a controversial nominee for a seat on the Supreme Court, Miers has repeatedly declined to reveal her position on the abortion question. Her reluctance has fired the consternation of both Republicans and Democrats who wonder what role she might play if given a lifelong seat on the nation's highest court.
NEWS
By PETER A. BROWN | October 28, 2005
ORLANDO, Fla. -- It isn't often the president of the United States messes up and his political enemies pay the price for his error. But that will be the upshot of Harriet Miers' aborted Supreme Court nomination. It was one conceived to avoid alienating Democrats, but it took Republicans for granted. Because President Bush's poll numbers have been low, he wanted to avoid a bruising Senate confirmation fight by picking someone whose lack of a paper trail or enemies would disarm the opposition.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,SUN REPORTER | October 28, 2005
Washington -- It was hard to ignore the comparison as President Bush toured hurricane-devastated South Florida yesterday, where millions were still without power. Bush's administration has become, in some ways, its own crisis zone, with the president's power to influence events in Washington increasingly in doubt. His failed Supreme Court nomination of Harriet E. Miers, a close and devoted friend from Dallas, was only the latest blow. Bush is famous for not backing down from tough fights.
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