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NEWS
July 13, 2013
Regarding your recent article on medical malpractice, even medical students circa 1988 knew that the labor-inducing drug Pitocin is to be given slowly and intravenously and that you don't push the baby out with your hand ("Court overturns judgment against Johns Hopkins in malpractice case," July 11). Humans are evolving with greater access to obstetricians, and devolving by thinking they should use midwives instead. Access to midwives alone is like losing a healthy child trying to deliver at the Superdome during Hurricane Katrina.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
A popular midwife practice whose partnership with Mercy Medical Center is ending because of rising malpractice costs has found a new home at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. Kathleen Slone CNM & Associates will move to new offices on York Road this week and begin taking patients June 23. Mercy told the midwives in October it was severing ties after two high-profile medical malpractice cases, though unrelated directly to the hospital, had driven up the cost of insurance and that it was looking for ways to alleviate the financial pressure.
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NEWS
October 16, 2013
We were saddened to read that Mercy Hospital will no longer allow Kathy Slone to continue her midwifery practice at their hospital ("Mercy to sever ties with midwife group," Oct. 11). We have three beautiful daughters, and our youngest two were delivered by Kathy and her staff. What extraordinary compassion, professionalism and intuition midwives bring to the birthing process. They practice what women have passed down since time began. Midwives focus on bringing a baby into the world as naturally as possible, relying on women's strength and the support of their families.
NEWS
October 16, 2013
We were saddened to read that Mercy Hospital will no longer allow Kathy Slone to continue her midwifery practice at their hospital ("Mercy to sever ties with midwife group," Oct. 11). We have three beautiful daughters, and our youngest two were delivered by Kathy and her staff. What extraordinary compassion, professionalism and intuition midwives bring to the birthing process. They practice what women have passed down since time began. Midwives focus on bringing a baby into the world as naturally as possible, relying on women's strength and the support of their families.
BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2000
Women would have easier access to nurse midwives under a bill that passed the Senate in Annapolis yesterday. Senators voted 46-1 to require health plans and HMOs to let their members go directly to certified nurse midwives for obstetric and gynecological care. The House of Delegates has overwhelmingly approved a similar measure. The two chambers must work out differences between the bills before the General Assembly session ends April 10. Alice J. Neily, lobbyist for the state's 200 nurse midwives, said the legislation would provide "very significant" health care benefits for women.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff writer | January 6, 1991
On New Year's Eve, Gloria Forgash was not celebrating like most holiday revelers.Instead, the veteran nurse midwife was helping deliver a baby boy during the last exhausting stint of a prolonged labor.Hours later, nurse midwife Ellen M. Ray arrived at the hospital for another marathon labor, resulting in the birth of a baby girl ninehours later.For Howard County's nurse midwives, it was out with the old and in with the new -- nurse midwives here delivered the lastbaby of 1990 and the first of 1991.
NEWS
By Denise Drake and Denise Drake,Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 9, 2002
Monique Cleary of Columbus, Ga., doesn't like pain. She gets light-headed during routine blood tests. So it's surprising to hear that she's aiming for a natural childbirth with no pain killers. "I am so ready," said Cleary, whose due date is imminent. "At first I was scared, but I'm not anymore. I think I know everything there is to know, and I'm ready for it." Cleary attributes her confidence to the care she's received during her pregnancy. Like a growing number of women, she chose to have her baby with the help of a nurse-midwife.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,Contributing Writer | May 18, 1993
A pregnant woman has nine months to get used to the idea of being a mother and expand her knowledge of birth and baby care.Building a bridge from her early confusion to comfortable understanding usually falls upon a medical professional. But it doesn't have to be an obstetrician/gynecologist who answers the questions and gives the treatment.It could be a certified nurse midwife.At the Eldersburg practice of Drs. Esposito, Mayer, Hogan & Associates, P.A., three certified nurse midwives -- Ellen M. Ray, Jackie Notes and Lauren E. Pohler -- practice side by side with six doctors.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | September 28, 1994
A Pennsylvania midwife who has delivered about 45 babies in Maryland pleaded guilty yesterday in Carroll County Circuit Court to practicing midwifery here and was ordered to perform 100 hours of community service counseling pregnant women in Pennsylvania."
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
A popular midwife practice whose partnership with Mercy Medical Center is ending because of rising malpractice costs has found a new home at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. Kathleen Slone CNM & Associates will move to new offices on York Road this week and begin taking patients June 23. Mercy told the midwives in October it was severing ties after two high-profile medical malpractice cases, though unrelated directly to the hospital, had driven up the cost of insurance and that it was looking for ways to alleviate the financial pressure.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Mercy Medical Center is parting ways with a midwife group that has worked out of the hospital for years because of rising malpractice insurance costs. The decision to close Kathleen Slone CNM & Associates, which plans to stop delivering babies in February, leaves women with fewer birthing choices outside of the traditional doctor. But Mercy said high-profile medical malpractice cases in recent months have driven up the cost of insurance, and the hospital was looking for ways to alleviate the financial pressure.
NEWS
July 13, 2013
Regarding your recent article on medical malpractice, even medical students circa 1988 knew that the labor-inducing drug Pitocin is to be given slowly and intravenously and that you don't push the baby out with your hand ("Court overturns judgment against Johns Hopkins in malpractice case," July 11). Humans are evolving with greater access to obstetricians, and devolving by thinking they should use midwives instead. Access to midwives alone is like losing a healthy child trying to deliver at the Superdome during Hurricane Katrina.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | May 24, 2013
Update : Carver said this afternoon that 50 total employees would lose their jobs, including 10 to 15 doctors and midwives. They could get jobs at other UMMS facilities, including other positions at Maryland General.  The obstetrics unit at Maryland General will close June 30th displacing 10 to 15 doctors and midwives. The news was first reported in the Baltimore Business Journal. The University of Maryland Medical System, which owns Maryland General, made the decision to stop the services because of a declining number of deliveries at the hospital, said spokeswoman Mary Lynn Carver.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | March 1, 2013
Supporters of home births are trying to convince legislators to create a pilot program that could  eventually lead to the licensing of midwives without nursing degrees. The three-year pilot would allow certified professional midwives to deliver babies in a home setting without worry of arrest or prosecution. Certified professional midwives are trained in midwifery and meet standards set by the North American Registry of Midwives. Under the pilot progam, midwives would share their birth outcomes with the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,Chicago Tribune | November 25, 2007
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- On the surface, nothing about last month's picture-perfect delivery of Linda Kerr seemed amiss. Her mother needed no pain medication. The labor was quick. Excited family members gathered nearby to welcome the newborn into the world. But in Missouri, where the Kerr baby was born in a carefully planned home birth, the experienced midwife hired to oversee the delivery was committing a Class C felony. "Can you imagine that?" asked Jessica Kerr, the mother of the healthy newborn.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 27, 2004
KABUL, Afghanistan - The pregnant woman was bleeding and in trouble. So Mullah Abdul, 42, helped load his terrified young cousin into a jitney van and sent her on the six-hour ride from her isolated village to the nearest hospital, in a town called Pul-e-Kumri. Three hours later, in the midst of the journey across the Hindu Kush mountains, the woman died. So did her child, struggling to be born. The driver turned around and drove them home to be buried. The young woman might have been saved by medicines that control bleeding and that are available in every delivery room in the United States.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | May 24, 2013
Update : Carver said this afternoon that 50 total employees would lose their jobs, including 10 to 15 doctors and midwives. They could get jobs at other UMMS facilities, including other positions at Maryland General.  The obstetrics unit at Maryland General will close June 30th displacing 10 to 15 doctors and midwives. The news was first reported in the Baltimore Business Journal. The University of Maryland Medical System, which owns Maryland General, made the decision to stop the services because of a declining number of deliveries at the hospital, said spokeswoman Mary Lynn Carver.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2002
It's not the bombs falling from U.S. warplanes or the years of drought or the shortage of doctors and medicine to treat disease that is killing the women in Afghanistan. They are courting death by giving life. Childbirth is the leading cause of death for Afghan women, many of whom have not seen the inside of a school or a hospital for years and who have a life expectancy of just 46 years. About 90 percent of women have their babies at home on their own. It can take days to reach a hospital, which is often not worth the trip.
NEWS
By Denise Drake and Denise Drake,Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 9, 2002
Monique Cleary of Columbus, Ga., doesn't like pain. She gets light-headed during routine blood tests. So it's surprising to hear that she's aiming for a natural childbirth with no pain killers. "I am so ready," said Cleary, whose due date is imminent. "At first I was scared, but I'm not anymore. I think I know everything there is to know, and I'm ready for it." Cleary attributes her confidence to the care she's received during her pregnancy. Like a growing number of women, she chose to have her baby with the help of a nurse-midwife.
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