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Midwinter

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By PETER BAKER | February 1, 1994
Larry Hindman, waterfowl program director for Maryland's Department of Natural Resources, was talking statistics, reviewing the numbers gathered during the Midwinter Waterfowl Survey completed Jan. 16.And while the total numbers of waterfowl counted in the survey were comparable to last year, there were categories that were especially significant -- either because they noted improvement or, at first glance, seemed to show decline."
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2011
As they entered a thicket in search of birds, Joe Hanfman and Joe Byrnes tracked lightly through virgin snow Wednesday morning in the chilly lull between an overnight dusting and a wallop of wintry precipitation. "The worse the weather, the better the birding," Hanfman had said, repeating a birders' mantra about a rise in sightings as migrants appear to ride out storms and rare species show up in unusual places. But nothing in nature applies all of the time. While Hanfman identified the calls of four types of woodpeckers emanating from the woods of the Middle Patuxent Environmental Area off Trotter Road in Clarksville, none of them appeared.
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SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1999
Maryland's midwinter count of waterfowl showed substantial increases over last year in numbers of several duck species and the migrant population of Canada geese, which registered the highest numbers since 1995."
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | December 13, 2006
Jim Kniss of Aberdeen asks why we regard the winter solstice (Dec. 21) as the start of winter: "It would be logical to define winter as the coldest three-month period of the year ... between very early December and very early March." I agree. So do meteorologists, whose statistical "winter" runs from Dec. 1 through the end of February. Our ancestors, too, saw the shortest days as midwinter, and held solstice rituals to ensure the sun's return. (Worked every time.) "Midsummer's Day" is still celebrated around June 21.
FEATURES
By Anne-Marie Schiro and Anne-Marie Schiro,New York Times News Service | January 16, 1992
The year may be new, but winter is old, and there is no sign yet of spring. It is the time you get bored with wearing the same clothes month after month and are yearning for something different.The markdowns in the stores look as tired as what's already hanging in your closet, so they provide scant comfort. But diligent shopping can turn up some early spring merchandise to perk up your spirits.One new outfit, or even one new item, can add a touch of freshness to a stale wardrobe. Perhaps a pair of platform pumps, which are showing signs of making a major comeback, can provide the needed lift.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 5, 1998
Annapolis will replace its lost 19th-century commercial buildings with more historic 18th-century predecessors.In a midwinter trade, Cuban pitching star Orlando Hernandez is heading toward Miami while Cardinal Keeler was sent to Havana.UGPresident arap Moi won re-election and all's right with the world.Michigan is No. 1! So who cares?Pub Date: 1/05/98
NEWS
February 13, 1995
John E. Lockard of Finksburg joined representatives from across the United States and Europe at the annual midwinter conference of the Reserve Officers Association Jan. 22 to Jan. 25 in Washington.A retired colonel in the U.S. Army, Mr. Lockard helped make decisions about Reserve Officers Association programs and projects and took part in discussions of legislative strategies related to national security.More than 1,200 people attended the conference.Speakers included Rep. Ike Skelton, a Missouri Democrat, and Sen. Strom Thurmond, a South Carolina Republican.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | December 13, 2006
Jim Kniss of Aberdeen asks why we regard the winter solstice (Dec. 21) as the start of winter: "It would be logical to define winter as the coldest three-month period of the year ... between very early December and very early March." I agree. So do meteorologists, whose statistical "winter" runs from Dec. 1 through the end of February. Our ancestors, too, saw the shortest days as midwinter, and held solstice rituals to ensure the sun's return. (Worked every time.) "Midsummer's Day" is still celebrated around June 21.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | January 21, 1993
Crop damage by deer can best be controlled through hunting does, a Department of Natural Resources official told farmers yesterday during the first day of Carroll County's midwinter farm meetings.County farmers also heard state extension agent James R. Russell say that prices for corn and soybeans may rise slightly next year.The two subjects were among eight topics covered at the first day of the midwinter farm meetings sponsored by the Carroll County Extension Agency.The Department of Natural Resources "feels that a regulated hunting program is the most effective and cheapest way of managing the deer population," said Robert A. Beyer, chief of wildlife operations, during his talk on the deer management permit program.
SPORTS
By NANCY NOYES | January 13, 1993
Many of the area's most competitive sailors have headed -- or are about to head -- south to warmer waters for winter competition.They will compete in several one-design class associations' midwinter championships, as well as the always popular Yachting Key West Race Week.In its traditional position early in the lineup was the 1993 J/24 Midwinter Championship, with the Coral Reef Yacht Club in Coral Gables, Fla., as host, last week.This year's fleet of 73 competitors came from across the United States and also included teams from Canada, Great Britain, France, Italy, Japan, Greece and Mexico.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Jamie Smith Hopkins and Lorraine Mirabella and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2004
A bitter cold winter has some people shivering as they cope with higher fuel costs, but it's paying off for others, from home insulators to taxi drivers to travel agents offering escapes to warm and sunny climes. Both natural gas and fuel oil prices are marching steadily higher, with wholesale natural gas up 25 percent from last year and crude oil inventories at their lowest levels since the 1970s - a combination that has made the past month more expensive for home heating than even last year's chilly January.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 16, 2003
With a flawless sense of timing, Glenette Schumacher, music and artistic director of the Arundel Vocal Arts Society, scheduled a Midwinter Rejoicing concert Sunday in this more contemplative period after the holiday hubbub. Equally flawless was her choice of a program replete with rarely heard works by Handel, Mozart, Mendelssohn and Menotti. The concert opened with Chandos No. 9, Psalm 135 by George Frideric Handel, an engaging work that was new to me. Sounding larger than its 70 voices, the full chorus sang an inspired "O Praise the Lord With One Consent" to begin the work with a joyous sound echoed by a dozen instrumentalists.
NEWS
January 21, 2001
The holidays are over, and perhaps much of the excitement has worn thin. Children can easily become bored during these blustery winter days when outdoor activities are cut short. However, you can still nourish your child's mind and find exciting literary. Here are some recommended cures for the winter blues by Junior Editions at Columbia Mall. BOOKS ABOUT ME: In these volumes children can print, draw and record details about their constantly developing lives, their self-discoveries, and they'll be making a treasure to keep for years to come.
ENTERTAINMENT
By VICTORIA BROWNWORTH and VICTORIA BROWNWORTH,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 2000
From deep in the dark midwinter burst forth the succulent buds of five marvelous new novels. Unable to afford that trip to Elsewhere as winds howl, snow billows and the flesh runs cold from dreams unrealized? Tuck in with one of these and be, as Emily Dickinson charged, taken miles away. A. L. Kennedy isn't a name well-known to Americans, few of whom could name a Scottish writer other than Robert Burns. Hers is a startlingly flesh and richly nuanced voice. In "So I Am Glad" (Knopf, 280 pages, $23)
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1999
Maryland's midwinter count of waterfowl showed substantial increases over last year in numbers of several duck species and the migrant population of Canada geese, which registered the highest numbers since 1995."
NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 5, 1998
Annapolis will replace its lost 19th-century commercial buildings with more historic 18th-century predecessors.In a midwinter trade, Cuban pitching star Orlando Hernandez is heading toward Miami while Cardinal Keeler was sent to Havana.UGPresident arap Moi won re-election and all's right with the world.Michigan is No. 1! So who cares?Pub Date: 1/05/98
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | February 10, 1991
Last year, 263 bald eagles were counted in Maryland's midwinter survey at Aberdeen Proving Grounds near the head of Chesapeake Bay and at Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge near Cambridge. This year, the January survey turned up 115 bald eagles and two golden eagles.Glenn Therres, supervisor of nongame and urban wildlife for the Department of Natural Resources, said, however, that the lower count does not mean Maryland's portion of the endangered bald eagle population is in further jeopardy.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1996
Because of an editing error, Charles R. Harrison's title, chief of the Baltimore County bureau of highways and traffic operations, was reported incorrectly in an article in The Sun on Wednesday.The Sun regrets the error.Hit by unusually severe winter weather twice in the past three years, Baltimore County officials plan some new twists in their annual struggle with nature.First, new technology: a computer map of the county's 166 snowplow routes. When perfected -- officials hope by midwinter -- residents will be able to check road conditions from their personal computers.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1996
Because of an editing error, Charles R. Harrison's title, chief of the Baltimore County bureau of highways and traffic operations, was reported incorrectly in an article in The Sun on Wednesday.The Sun regrets the error.Hit by unusually severe winter weather twice in the past three years, Baltimore County officials plan some new twists in their annual struggle with nature.First, new technology: a computer map of the county's 166 snowplow routes. When perfected -- officials hope by midwinter -- residents will be able to check road conditions from their personal computers.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | December 3, 1995
DECEMBER WON'T BE a kind month for Parris Glendening. The bad news starts December 12 when the Board of Revenue Estimates meets to set tax-receipt estimates for the coming year's budget. It isn't likely to be upbeat.Later in the month, legislative and business leaders meet to set a ceiling for overall state spending. That won't be very cheery, either.Maryland's economy has been under-performing even the state's own modest expectations.A year ago, the revenue board projected a 4 percent growth rate in sales-tax receipts for the fiscal year that started in July.
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