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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Mercy Medical Center is parting ways with a midwife group that has worked out of the hospital for years because of rising malpractice insurance costs. The decision to close Kathleen Slone CNM & Associates, which plans to stop delivering babies in February, leaves women with fewer birthing choices outside of the traditional doctor. But Mercy said high-profile medical malpractice cases in recent months have driven up the cost of insurance, and the hospital was looking for ways to alleviate the financial pressure.
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NEWS
By Marion Subah | August 19, 2014
Monrovia, Liberia - We sat in a waiting room of a health clinic here, talking about our fears. As a midwifery and nursing educator working in Liberia for Jhpiego, a Johns Hopkins University affiliate, I had been asked to help update health workers on the critical skills and interventions essential to managing Ebola cases. I was prepared to talk about the disease - what it is, how to care for patients and how to prevent it from spreading. But before I could do that, I knew we had to talk about how terrifying the job is. A nurse sitting across from me spoke candidly about his first experience with an Ebola patient - he didn't want to have any physical contact with the person, he was so terrified.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
The Maryland Board of Nursing has added a sixth case in its order suspending the license of an Ellicott City nurse midwife for her alleged actions during home births in recent years — including a case in which Johns Hopkins Hospital was ordered to pay one of the largest malpractice judgments in the state. The newest case cited by the board involved an infant whose delivery was aided by Evelyn Muhlhan and who later died. The baby turned blue shortly after birth and died about a month later at a hospital after being removed from an advanced breathing machine, according her mother, who complained to the board.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
A popular midwife practice whose partnership with Mercy Medical Center is ending because of rising malpractice costs has found a new home at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. Kathleen Slone CNM & Associates will move to new offices on York Road this week and begin taking patients June 23. Mercy told the midwives in October it was severing ties after two high-profile medical malpractice cases, though unrelated directly to the hospital, had driven up the cost of insurance and that it was looking for ways to alleviate the financial pressure.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
A popular midwife practice whose partnership with Mercy Medical Center is ending because of rising malpractice costs has found a new home at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. Kathleen Slone CNM & Associates will move to new offices on York Road this week and begin taking patients June 23. Mercy told the midwives in October it was severing ties after two high-profile medical malpractice cases, though unrelated directly to the hospital, had driven up the cost of insurance and that it was looking for ways to alleviate the financial pressure.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2012
More than 500 Maryland moms delivered babies at home last year, but as such births become more popular, a dispute is brewing over whether to make the process a more viable option in the state. Home births are on the rise in the United States with deliveries jumping 29 percent between 2004 and 2009, according to data by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released last week. Maryland home births increased at an even more rapid clip of 62.5 percent. But supporters of home births say that Maryland still places too many restrictions on obtaining a midwife, and they have started a grass roots movement to ease the standards.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | May 18, 1995
Judie Ray Pradier's trial on charges of illegally delivering babies turned into a testimonial of sorts yesterday when scores of parents packed a Howard County courtroom to support her and lay midwifery.More than 150 supporters, including many children delivered by midwives, were gathered at the District Court in Ellicott City to defend the right to enlist lay midwives to deliver babies at homes.The case ended with a surprise victory for Ms. Pradier, a 38-year-old Adelphi resident who estimates that she has delivered 400 babies in the past nine years.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1996
The Court of Special Appeals has upheld the 1995 conviction of a Glenarm midwife who attended the stillbirth of a Sykesville couple's son in December 1994.The appeal stemmed from a Carroll County Circuit Court case against Karen Hunter, 35, who received a suspended six-month sentence for practicing nursing without a license and was ordered to stop practicing midwifery unless she becomes a certified midwife.Hunter said last year that she had been a lay midwife for eight years and had delivered about 145 babies before attending the birth of Cynthia and Johnny Morgan's 13-pound son, Jonathan Caleb Morgan.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
The Maryland Court of Special Appeals overturned a multimillion-dollar judgment against Johns Hopkins Hospital in a case that accused its doctors of causing severe and irreversible brain damage to a baby born at the hospital. The judges ordered the case sent back to a lower court for retrial. They ruled that Hopkins should have been allowed to give more testimony about the role a midwife might have played in the baby's injuries. Attorneys for the baby's family said Wednesday that they will appeal the decision to the Court of Appeals, the state's highest court.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,Contributing Writer | May 18, 1993
A pregnant woman has nine months to get used to the idea of being a mother and expand her knowledge of birth and baby care.Building a bridge from her early confusion to comfortable understanding usually falls upon a medical professional. But it doesn't have to be an obstetrician/gynecologist who answers the questions and gives the treatment.It could be a certified nurse midwife.At the Eldersburg practice of Drs. Esposito, Mayer, Hogan & Associates, P.A., three certified nurse midwives -- Ellen M. Ray, Jackie Notes and Lauren E. Pohler -- practice side by side with six doctors.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Mercy Medical Center is parting ways with a midwife group that has worked out of the hospital for years because of rising malpractice insurance costs. The decision to close Kathleen Slone CNM & Associates, which plans to stop delivering babies in February, leaves women with fewer birthing choices outside of the traditional doctor. But Mercy said high-profile medical malpractice cases in recent months have driven up the cost of insurance, and the hospital was looking for ways to alleviate the financial pressure.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
The Maryland Court of Special Appeals overturned a multimillion-dollar judgment against Johns Hopkins Hospital in a case that accused its doctors of causing severe and irreversible brain damage to a baby born at the hospital. The judges ordered the case sent back to a lower court for retrial. They ruled that Hopkins should have been allowed to give more testimony about the role a midwife might have played in the baby's injuries. Attorneys for the baby's family said Wednesday that they will appeal the decision to the Court of Appeals, the state's highest court.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2012
The Maryland Board of Nursing has added a sixth case in its order suspending the license of an Ellicott City nurse midwife for her alleged actions during home births in recent years — including a case in which Johns Hopkins Hospital was ordered to pay one of the largest malpractice judgments in the state. The newest case cited by the board involved an infant whose delivery was aided by Evelyn Muhlhan and who later died. The baby turned blue shortly after birth and died about a month later at a hospital after being removed from an advanced breathing machine, according her mother, who complained to the board.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2012
When a jury ordered Johns Hopkins Hospital to pay $55 million to a Baltimore family whose newborn was brain-damaged, the case hinged on what doctors and nurses did in the two hours before birth. But the jury never heard about the nurse midwife trying to deliver the baby at home during the half-day before the mother arrived by ambulance at the emergency room because of what court documents called "fetal distress. " Evelyn Muhlhan's license was suspended by the Maryland Board of Nursing for her alleged actions during that delivery and four other home deliveries over three years.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2012
More than 500 Maryland moms delivered babies at home last year, but as such births become more popular, a dispute is brewing over whether to make the process a more viable option in the state. Home births are on the rise in the United States with deliveries jumping 29 percent between 2004 and 2009, according to data by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released last week. Maryland home births increased at an even more rapid clip of 62.5 percent. But supporters of home births say that Maryland still places too many restrictions on obtaining a midwife, and they have started a grass roots movement to ease the standards.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | October 6, 2008
Eugenia M. "Jeanne" Kappler, a nurse-midwife who delivered many babies during nearly four decades in Maryland, died Tuesday of lung cancer at Brakeley Park Care Center in Phillipsburg, N.J. She was 83. Miss Kappler, a native of Oxford, N.J., was the youngest of seven children. She served in the Army Cadet Nursing Corps from 1943 to 1946 and graduated from St. Francis School of Nursing in Trenton, N.J., in 1946. A decade later, she received a nursing degree from Villanova University. Miss Kappler also studied to be a certified nurse-midwife at the Johns Hopkins University, graduating in 1958, and earned a master's degree from the University of Maryland in 1959, said her niece, Mary Alice Bockman.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | May 24, 1994
Nancy Kroh Dowell of Severna Park remembers her frustration at feeling "anonymous" in the office of her Annapolis obstetrician when she was pregnant with her first child."
NEWS
By Joe Otterbein | February 15, 1995
ON JAN. 20, my sister, Karen Hunter, was arrested, as her children watched, at her home in Glenarm in Baltimore County. Her crime: As a lay midwife she assisted in the birth of a baby who arrived still-born in December.Did the parents of the dead infant order her arrested? No, in fact, the parents -- Cynthia and Johnny Morgan of Carroll County -- are appalled that she was arrested; they don't blame her for the death of their 13-pound son, Jonathan Caleb Morgan.Her arrest came at the behest of authorities eager to close down the practices of all lay midwives.
NEWS
April 7, 2007
Pleasant Mae Suggs-Evans, a homemaker and former nurse-midwife, died of a heart attack Tuesday at St. Agnes Hospital. She was 96. Pleasant Mae Suggs was born in Bayboro, N.C., and raised and educated in Ayden, N.C. She was married in 1930 to Joseph C. Evans, a longshoreman, and moved to Baltimore in 1940. He died in 1978. From the 1940s until the 1960s, Mrs. Suggs-Evans was a nurse-midwife. She also worked for the Model Cities Program helping to organize programs for senior citizens.
NEWS
November 10, 2005
Katherine P. Gary, a retired registered nurse and midwife, died of leukemia Nov. 3 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Ruxton resident was 67. She was born and raised Katherine Patricia Meade in Crosshaven, County Cork, Ireland. She earned her nursing and midwifery degrees with honors from Saint Finbarr's Hospital School of Nursing in Cork. She began her nursing career in Ireland and in 1969 became a registered nurse at New Rochelle (N.Y.) Medical Center. In 1972, she moved to Baltimore when she became a critical care nurse at the former veterans hospital on Loch Raven Boulevard.
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