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By Jules Witcover | May 16, 2014
Every two-term president since the 22nd Amendment was ratified in 1951 has faced being a lame-duck upon his re-election. Barack Obama clearly is no exception. With approximately 28 months left in his presidency, the clock is running out as he seeks to achieve a favorable legacy. Unless Mr. Obama's party defies the odds and retains control of the Senate and recaptures the House in the November elections, the outlook seems dim to reverse the Republican obstructionism that has hobbled most of his White House tenure.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 16, 2014
Every two-term president since the 22nd Amendment was ratified in 1951 has faced being a lame-duck upon his re-election. Barack Obama clearly is no exception. With approximately 28 months left in his presidency, the clock is running out as he seeks to achieve a favorable legacy. Unless Mr. Obama's party defies the odds and retains control of the Senate and recaptures the House in the November elections, the outlook seems dim to reverse the Republican obstructionism that has hobbled most of his White House tenure.
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NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | October 21, 1998
WASHINGTON -- With the midterm elections less than two weeks away, it is becoming increasingly apparent that there is no theme to this pudding. The results apparently will tell us very little.When the campaign year began in January, it seemed at least possible that the party controlling the White House might reverse the usual pattern and actually gain seats at the midpoint of the president's second term.Indeed, because so many House Republicans appeared vulnerable, the Democrats had at least a realistic chance to get the 11 seats needed to regain control.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 28, 2014
Probably no single episode did more to assure President Obama's 2012 re-election than that supposedly private fundraising lunch at which Mitt Romney famously declared that "47 percent of Americans" would never vote for him. The remark, unexpectedly captured on video, spread swiftly over the Internet and the airwaves, marking the hapless Mr. Romney in his own words as an elitist icon of the rich, unable or unwilling to comprehend how the other half...
NEWS
November 18, 2010
Obviously the Democratic/Socialist Party did not hear American citizens in the midterm elections. By choosing Nancy "shut up, I know what's best for you" Pelosi as leader of the House Democrats, they have again thumbed their noses at us. Not to worry, we will be heard — 2012 is coming and we will make sure the message is sent loud and clear! Peggy Alley, Baltimore
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 23, 1997
WASHINGTON -- While the Democratic Party faces huge debts and mounting legal fees, the Republican Party is collecting millions of dollars to fill its campaign coffers.The Republican National Committee raised more than $20 million in the first four months of 1997, a total that included the year's first million-dollar donation. Richard DeVos, a co-founder of Amway Corp., and his wife contributed $1 million to the RNC in April. Tobacco giant Philip Morris Cos. has given the RNC $270,000.The Democratic National Committee has raised $14.4 million, but still has $16 million in debt from last year's campaign.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 6, 2002
NEW YORK - Republicans want to crown former New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani king of the campaign trail. GOP candidates and party officials around the country are clamoring for Giuliani's help in this year's House and Senate midterm elections - and he is eager to oblige. Enjoying sky-high ratings for leading the city through the terrorist attacks and wearing the mantle of Time magazine's "Person of the Year," Giuliani has emerged as the Republican Party's hottest commodity next to President Bush.
NEWS
November 5, 2010
I am encouraged by the conciliatory article in the aftermath of the midterm elections ("Change wins again," editorial, Nov. 4). My question would be whether or not Rep. John Boehner can really be trusted to work together with congressional Democrats. Breaking congressional gridlock was President Obama's strongly stated intention when we elected him, but from day one he was met with a stony-faced "no" from the defeated Republicans. As much as I want to trust this new promise of bipartisanship from Rep. Boehner, I'm afraid a significant percentage of the politically conservative American people he represents have for too long been influenced by those who regale them with undocumented information, e.g. that Obama is a closet Muslim, that all Muslims are plotting terrorism, that global warming is a hoax, that homosexual people are not allowed equal rights under the law, etc. It would certainly help convince me of Rep. Boehner's trustworthiness and clarify his stance to the American people if the newly elected lawmakers could begin by addressing some of these nagging issues and finally laying such rumors to rest.
NEWS
By William Schneider | November 9, 1990
WHAT DID NOT happen in this year's midterm elections was %% more interesting than what did happen. %%%% The Democrats did not win a landslide victory. A lot of Democrats expected to win big this year after they threw the Republicans on the defensive with the "tax-the-rich" issue.The Republicans did not improve their position in Congress or in the states. Earlier this year, a lot of Republicans believed the GOP might make gains this year, in defiance of the usual pattern in which the president's party suffers a setback in midterm elections.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | June 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The political gamesmanship is heating up between the White House and Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole of Kansas as they wrestle with the possible impact of the fight over health care reform on the November midterm elections.In its desire to have legislation that demonstrates to voters that gridlock has been broken, the White House is playing softball.While reiterating that President Clinton will veto any proposal that doesn't deliver "universal coverage," two ranking spokesmen, White House Deputy Chief of Staff Harold Ickes and White House counselor David Gergen, told weekend television interview shows that Clinton would accept achieving it over several years.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 17, 2014
Nine months before the midterm congressional elections that could make or break the final push for President Obama's legacy, he is revving up a broader outreach effort in the hope of reviving the support and spirit that brought him two terms in the Oval Office. He says he will make greater use of executive-branch initiatives to achieve aspects of his original agenda for change that have encountered legislative roadblocks over his first three years in the White House. He is launching a series of conversations with educators, private-sector leaders and outside nonprofit groups that has the look of an end-run around the recalcitrant Congress on projects achievable through the unique powers of the executive.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | November 22, 2011
Ronald Reagan famously asked Americans, "Are you better off than you were four years ago?" in a 1980 debate with then-President Jimmy Carter. They weren't, and Reagan, a Republican, went on to win the 1980 election in a landslide. Baltimore City residents are not better off than they were two years ago, or four years ago or even 10 years ago. In the last decade, tens of thousands of people have left, along with their jobs, shrinking the tax base. And poverty is at 26 percent, up 20 percent from a year earlier.
NEWS
November 18, 2010
Obviously the Democratic/Socialist Party did not hear American citizens in the midterm elections. By choosing Nancy "shut up, I know what's best for you" Pelosi as leader of the House Democrats, they have again thumbed their noses at us. Not to worry, we will be heard — 2012 is coming and we will make sure the message is sent loud and clear! Peggy Alley, Baltimore
NEWS
November 10, 2010
In law, there are loopholes — ambiguities that allow circumvention of rules — and there are outrageous loopholes that virtually nullify legal requirements. Maryland's campaign finance law has much of the former and is quickly approaching the latter. Let's say, for instance, you are a fabulously wealthy businessman and wish to give a candidate for governor a lot more than the $4,000 to which you are restricted by law. No problem. There are any number of ways to circumvent the limit.
NEWS
November 5, 2010
I am encouraged by the conciliatory article in the aftermath of the midterm elections ("Change wins again," editorial, Nov. 4). My question would be whether or not Rep. John Boehner can really be trusted to work together with congressional Democrats. Breaking congressional gridlock was President Obama's strongly stated intention when we elected him, but from day one he was met with a stony-faced "no" from the defeated Republicans. As much as I want to trust this new promise of bipartisanship from Rep. Boehner, I'm afraid a significant percentage of the politically conservative American people he represents have for too long been influenced by those who regale them with undocumented information, e.g. that Obama is a closet Muslim, that all Muslims are plotting terrorism, that global warming is a hoax, that homosexual people are not allowed equal rights under the law, etc. It would certainly help convince me of Rep. Boehner's trustworthiness and clarify his stance to the American people if the newly elected lawmakers could begin by addressing some of these nagging issues and finally laying such rumors to rest.
NEWS
By Ben Krull | November 4, 2010
Now that the midterm elections are over, political junkies are experiencing painful withdrawal symptoms that include loitering at the site of their local polling place, re-watching candidate debates recorded on Tivo and leafing through old editions of the Cook Political Report. But why should the political absurdity end with Election Day? Here are a few scenarios to watch for in the days and weeks ahead that might help the politically addicted — you know who you are — to get over their post-election blues (or post-election reds, if they are Democrats)
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | September 12, 1994
Washington -- Leaders of the Republican minority in the House of Representatives are secretly drawing up plans to change the rules of that distinguished body.They would like to eliminate a few committees, particularly the Energy and Commerce Committee -- now chaired by Rep. John Dingell of Michigan -- which for some reason has to pass on 40 percent of all legislation before the House. More important, at least to members, is the distribution of staff among the two parties. Under the rules written by Democrats, who have controlled the body for more than 40 years, the majority gets three staffers for every one allotted to the minority.
NEWS
By George F. Will | November 8, 1990
Washington. SUETONIUS, with a journalist's eye for the telling detail, wrote that Julius Caesar, although stabbed 23 times, nevertheless arranged his toga nicely as he fell. Similarly, Republicans were decorous in defeat Tuesday night.They insouciantly said that a loss of 27 House seats is average for a party holding the presidency during midterm elections, so a loss of at least nine or so seats 'tis a famous victory. But to understand how far the GOP has fallen, consider the historic low base from which it began this year.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 2, 2010
America voted Tuesday amid much anger and fear. The anger is felt toward a federal government perceived by many to be ignoring the public will. The fear is of an uncertain future in the hands of politicians who seem to many voters unable to cope with the new economic distress. Much of the anger has been deep but unfocused. As expressed by some in the tea party movement and by other conservatives, the country under President Barack Obama is moving down the road to "socialism. " Whether through the new health care act, the new regulations of the banking and investment world, or the auto company bailouts, he is seen by the most extreme of them to be like some kind of foreign agent.
NEWS
By Kara van Stralen | October 8, 2010
Upon hearing that "midterms" are coming up, many voters ages 18-29 still get that queasy feeling that comes with the thought of taking intense exams. I know I do. Perhaps that is one reason we rarely show up for midterm elections. Recent polling suggests that there could be a reduction of more than 40 percent in young voter turnout this year, compared to 2008. But the stakes are high this year, and young people need to show their strength again at the polls or risk losing accurate representation and movement on policy that directly affects them and the issues they care most about.
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