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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is serving up a meaty program this week and is welcoming back some substantial guest artists to help deliver it. Midori, the supernaturally gifted violinist and energetic champion of music education, makes her first BSO appearance since 2001 playing Bartok's Violin Concerto No. 2. On Thursday night at Meyerhoff Hall, she burrowed so deeply into this complex and ever-fascinating score that she seemed to be composing it...
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is serving up a meaty program this week and is welcoming back some substantial guest artists to help deliver it. Midori, the supernaturally gifted violinist and energetic champion of music education, makes her first BSO appearance since 2001 playing Bartok's Violin Concerto No. 2. On Thursday night at Meyerhoff Hall, she burrowed so deeply into this complex and ever-fascinating score that she seemed to be composing it...
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 22, 1999
The violin and piano recital of Midori and Robert McDonald Wednesday evening at Friedberg Hall at the Peabody Conservatory can be characterized simply as beautiful, big-hearted and brilliant.The last of these adjectives refers as much to the remarkable intelligence of the musicians as to their flabbergastingly high level of instrumental accomplishment.The sold-out recital, for which both artists donated their services to benefit the conservatory's piano scholarship fund, was cunningly planned.
NEWS
January 23, 2009
On January 20, 2009, SIMON K. PRICE, devoted husband of Midori Baer Price; beloved son of Teaette and the late Bruce Price; dear brother of Benjamin Price, Jennifer Corder and Heather Smith Wycks. Also survived by nieces and nephews Gunnar, August, Victor, and Hannah Price, Gabriel, Rebecca and Adam Corder, Madeline and Harrison Smith; numerous aunts, uncles and cousins. Private viewing for the family members on Friday, followed by a service at the Patapsco Methodist Church, 7800 Wise Avenue, Dundalk, MD at 6 P.M. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Hope House, 26 Marbury Drive, Crownsville, MD 21032.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | April 24, 1997
When she was 10, Midori was an extraordinary child prodigy; now that that she is 25, she is something even more extraordinary -- one of the world's most thoughtful and provocative musicians. The great violinist visits D.A.R. Constitution Hall in Washington Saturday for an interesting program of works in which she will be partnered by her favorite collaborator, the superb pianist Robert McDonald.The program includes two favorite works, Franck's ever-popular Sonata in A and Mozart's Sonata in F (K.376)
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | June 1, 1991
Midori's appearance with David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra last night in Meyerhoff Hall made three things abundantly clear. She looks great in yellow; she plays the violin sensationally well; and she isn't yet mature enough to have much of an idea of what the Brahms Violin Concerto is about.A 19-year-old violinist shouldn't be expected to give authoritative performances of pieces as profound as the Brahms Concerto, of course. But this listener heard Midori perform a superb Sibelius Concerto a month ago despite an indifferent accompaniment from conductor Kurt Masur and the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, so he had hopes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 9, 2001
IT WAS THE end of a long week of commuting to Washington aboard the unbelievably slow MARC train. All I wanted was a good meal in nice surroundings. As we approached Midori, the assigned restaurant on Belair Road, my tired, slightly cranky heart sank. How could decent Chinese and Japanese food come out of a converted Taco Bell? Easy, if your ancestors were Chinese and Japanese, as is the case of the Wang family, who opened Midori in May. They took over the old Taco Bell just inside the Beltway because it looked like a good location.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | June 3, 1991
MIDORI, THE 19-year-old violin genius who shines light into dark corners, is herself a night person who wakes up at 3 or 4 in the afternoon, practices deep into the night and goes to bed about 5 or 6 in the morning."
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 6, 2001
"Music is not illusion," Tchaikovsky reportedly said, "but revelation." Last evening at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, his Violin Concerto turned out to be exactly that - a revelation. Yes, it was, on paper, the same Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto that has been played a trillion times or more since its premiere in 1881. But it wasn't really the same work at all. The notes took on new coloring, new intensity, new depth in a memorable performance featuring Midori with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and music director Yuri Temirkanov.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 12, 1996
When Midori, then 19, played Brahms' Violin Concerto with the Baltimore Symphony and music director David Zinman five years ago, her performance was filled with nervous intensity that made the piece fly like the wind. She joined Zinman and the orchestra last night in the same Brahms concerto in Meyerhoff Hall in the BSO's season-opening concert to give a performance that could not have been more different.The intensity -- even more of it, perhaps -- is still there. But now it is tragic intensity, and it produced a reading that flowed like molten lava.
FEATURES
October 25, 2007
66 Anne Tyler Author 50 Nancy Cartwright Actress 45 Chad Smith Rock musician 36 Midori Violinist 22 Ciara Singer
NEWS
August 30, 2005
On Tuesday, August 23, 2005 STEPHANIE JAROSINSKI, age 21, passed away. Born in Naples, Italy. She was a student and artist at Virginia Commonwealth University. She had exhibited her Art in Richmond and was an active member of the local Art community. She brought joy and vibrancy to her family and to everyone's life she touched. Daughter of Michael and Judy Jarosinski; sister of Michele and Chris Jarosinski; granddaughter of Midori Jorgenson of San Francisco, CA, and John and Jean Jarosinski of Baltimore, MD; fiancee of Kyle Luff of Richmond, VA. Condolences may be offered to the family at www.hollomon-browm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 9, 2001
IT WAS THE end of a long week of commuting to Washington aboard the unbelievably slow MARC train. All I wanted was a good meal in nice surroundings. As we approached Midori, the assigned restaurant on Belair Road, my tired, slightly cranky heart sank. How could decent Chinese and Japanese food come out of a converted Taco Bell? Easy, if your ancestors were Chinese and Japanese, as is the case of the Wang family, who opened Midori in May. They took over the old Taco Bell just inside the Beltway because it looked like a good location.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | May 17, 2001
There aren't a lot of national chains of Chinese restaurants out there - one theory being that wok cooking doesn't lend itself to consistency. But one chain has been successful: P. F. Chang's China Bistro, with 55 locations around the country. The area's first P. F. Chang's opens in The Mall in Columbia this week. Expect the kind of high-style (read expensive) decor you don't find in small, family-owned Chinese restaurants. But even though this is a 200-seat chain restaurant, the food is cooked to order in the open kitchen, with specialties like "Chang's Chicken in Soothing Lettuce Wraps," orange peel shrimp, Mongolian beef and crab won tons.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 6, 2001
"Music is not illusion," Tchaikovsky reportedly said, "but revelation." Last evening at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, his Violin Concerto turned out to be exactly that - a revelation. Yes, it was, on paper, the same Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto that has been played a trillion times or more since its premiere in 1881. But it wasn't really the same work at all. The notes took on new coloring, new intensity, new depth in a memorable performance featuring Midori with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and music director Yuri Temirkanov.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 4, 2001
She's a woman with one name, but multiple lives. Midori's fame as a violinist reveals only part of her story. In addition to a steady schedule of concert engagements, including a stint playing Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra this week, she is heavily involved with the nonprofit organization she founded to enhance music education in New York City public schools. She also plans to add violin teaching to her schedule next fall, joining the faculty of the Manhattan School of Music.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 11, 1996
Midori will return to the scene of the crime tonight when she performs the Brahms Violin Concerto with David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony in the orchestra's first subscription concert.This is not to say that there was anything criminal about the way Midori, then 19, played the Brahms back in 1991 when she made her first appearance here with Zinman and the BSO. It was, in fact, a remarkable performance in which difficult-to-reach chords that many violinists fake were dispatched with ease; carefully controlled vibrato never obscured the pure core of the note; bow changes were seamless; and intonation had an almost unearthly purity.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 20, 1999
Absolute power corrupts absolutely.But there are exceptions to that rule -- people so good that they're incapable of being corrupted, such as the violinist Midori.She's got the power to charge one of the highest fees in classical music and draw sellout crowds no matter how high the ticket prices. That's why the Peabody Conservatory wanted to engage her for the benefit recital that the violinist and her longtime collaborator and Peabody professor of piano, Robert McDonald, give tonight in Friedberg Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By HOLLY SELBY and HOLLY SELBY,SUN STAFF WRITER | January 9, 2000
Violinist Midori stood on the stage at Peabody's Friedberg Concert Hall, slender, youthful and completely focused on the music she was creating. Just behind her, Robert McDonald sat at a grand piano. The program the duo performed last fall included Mozart's Sonata in A Major and Franck's Sonata in A Major; the music made by each performer fit together like tightly clasped hands. Midori's playing was first fiery then serene then fiery again. McDonald's piano music filled and shaped the spaces between the violinist's notes.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 22, 1999
The violin and piano recital of Midori and Robert McDonald Wednesday evening at Friedberg Hall at the Peabody Conservatory can be characterized simply as beautiful, big-hearted and brilliant.The last of these adjectives refers as much to the remarkable intelligence of the musicians as to their flabbergastingly high level of instrumental accomplishment.The sold-out recital, for which both artists donated their services to benefit the conservatory's piano scholarship fund, was cunningly planned.
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