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By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2010
"You get up. You are black," the woman screamed as she pointed to a student in the front row to leave. "Segregation now. Segregation forever. " The words were so astounding to this group of eighth-graders that they sat silent and stunned. The woman was Janice Washington, a teacher and civil rights activist who wanted eighth-graders at Sudbrook Middle Magnet School in Baltimore County to feel the same sense of outrage that she had felt as an African-American growing up in Texas, even if just for a second.
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NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
More than 50 Maryland middle-schools students have been building a house during a summer camp in Annapolis - not a routine task for teens and preteens. "I came here skeptical," acknowledged JJ Jennings, 13, a rising eighth-grader at the Key School in Annapolis. "Why am I paying to do labor?" To be fair, the house is a small-scale project - 210 square feet and sitting on trailer in the Key School parking lot. But that doesn't mean it's a not a big deal. Complete with solar panels and a rainwater filtration system, the compact home is designed to have the smallest possible carbon footprint.
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NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
More than 50 Maryland middle-schools students have been building a house during a summer camp in Annapolis - not a routine task for teens and preteens. "I came here skeptical," acknowledged JJ Jennings, 13, a rising eighth-grader at the Key School in Annapolis. "Why am I paying to do labor?" To be fair, the house is a small-scale project - 210 square feet and sitting on trailer in the Key School parking lot. But that doesn't mean it's a not a big deal. Complete with solar panels and a rainwater filtration system, the compact home is designed to have the smallest possible carbon footprint.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2014
More than a decade before thousands rallied outside the State House in Annapolis for adequate school facilities for the city's children, several dozen residents met in a school lunchroom in Northeast Baltimore to lay the groundwork for building just one new school in their community. The campaign for a new building in Waverly began in 2003 when the school board decided to expand the elementary school to serve middle school students as well. Eventually, city officials promised, those students would move into a new building to rival the high-performing Roland Park Middle, which they would have attended.
EXPLORE
April 2, 2012
Two area middle school students will be among the 11 students honored April 17 in the 15th Annual Baltimore County Middle School Writing Contest. The contest, sponsored and judged by the senior literary arts students at George Washington Carver Center for Arts and Technology county magnet high school in Towson, attracted 330 poems, 106 short stories and 88 works of nonfiction. Kavya Kavanakudy, a seventh-grader at Arbutus Middle School, earned honorable mention for her poem, "The Relief of the Majestic Forest.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
At community cleanups this year, eighth-grade students from Dundalk Middle School heard a lot of complaints about rats — rodents roaming alleys, gnawing on plastic trash cans and digging deep holes in yards. Students in Patricia Knight's environmental science classes figured they could do something about it, by gathering data and ultimately launching their own eradication efforts. Soon after the cleanups, Knight asked her eighth-graders how many had recently spotted a rat in their neighborhood.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood and For The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
From Liz Atwood: If your tween doesn't have a smart phone or tablet yet, I'll bet it's on the Christmas wish list. Yet as pervasive as mobile devices are, I was still astounded to see a new study from the Verizon Foundation that shows more than one third of middle school students are doing their homework with the help of a smart phone or tablet. The study found smartphone use crossing income levels and ethnicity. Nearly a third of children from the poorest households said they used smartphones for homework.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1995
Two Harford County middle school students have been informed that they will be suspended for the rest of the school year on suspicion of playing a prank with a firecracker-like device that injured a school custodian.The two students, ages 14 and 15, were at Fallston High School on May 18 for a fashion show when a toilet stall door was booby trapped with the device, called a Pulling Trick.The device is about the size of a fat toothpick with a 3-inch string attached to each end. When the strings are pulled, the Pulling Trick explodes with a sound similar to a cap.The custodian, Eric McClung, received first- and second-degree burns and bruises to his left hand when he tried to push the stall door open.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | February 28, 1994
Brooklyn Park/Lindale Middle School students are working on four projects to benefit the county's homeless and needy.Eighth-grader Brice Carson and his teacher Richard Burger toured Sarah's House, a Fort Meade shelter for women, last month to learn more about how the residents live. Brice walked out the door with a 68-item "wish list" of things needed by residents.In March, he plans to start fulfilling their wishes by asking schoolmates to donate such goods as disposable diapers, baby food, hair brushes, pillows, powdered milk, tuna, and clothing for adults and children.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | October 17, 1990
WESTMINSTER - For sixth-graders Ashley VanDoren and Lindsey Peregoff, after-school life is a slice of Norman Rockwell Americana -- nickel sodas at the local drug store and a stroll down Main Street to the public library."
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2014
Oakland Mills High School senior John Dean didn't join the school's choir until his junior year — a decision he now describes as a mistake he hopes younger students interested in singing don't make. This week, he and fellow choir members will have a chance to influence younger singers, as Oakland Mills takes the lead role in the Oakland Mills Community Choral Festival, scheduled for Wednesday. For the second year, the school is organizing the festival, which enables its choir to perform with groups from neighboring elementary and middle schools, combining hundreds of voices from students in grades five through 12. Students from Atholton, Jeffers Hill, Talbott Springs and Thunder Hill elementary schools, Lake Elkhorn and Oakland Mills middle schools and Oakland Mills High School will perform together in concert Wednesday evening at Bridgeway Community Church in Columbia.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2013
School days for Baltimore County high school students will be significantly different next year when Superintendent Dallas Dance imposes a uniform, eight-class schedule throughout the district. The move allows students to squeeze in more lessons. That could help transfer students who had to drop classes when they moved to schools with shorter schedules or failing students who are falling behind in the credits they need for graduation, proponents say. School officials said the shift also makes better use of the teaching staff.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | October 7, 2013
When Baltimore City Police Commissioner Anthony Batts addressed the Roland Park Civic League last May at Roland Park Elementary/Middle School, he urged members of "a sophisticated community" to find ways of using their skills and expertise to help "save Baltimore as a whole. " "We are Baltimore," he said. Now, the public school and the Roland Park Civic League are taking Batts' advice to heart. They are collaborating on a new mentoring program to help middle school students from outside Roland Park adjust to a school in an unfamiliar area.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Burleigh Manor Middle School sixth-grade teacher George McGurl says he can recall having an interest in science back in early middle school, and he says his sixth-grade teacher will back him up on that. For good measure, McGurl summons Burleigh Manor science teacher Daryl Blickenstaff - who was McGurl's sixth-grade teacher at Ellicott Mills Middle more than two decades ago, and is one of several of his former teachers working alongside him now. McGurl, 35, said his teachers recognized and cultivated his interests and passions early on. Now he working to do the same for other children.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 20, 2013
Seventh-graders at Harford Friends School have a new opportunity to let their voices be heard as far away as Afghanistan. The only school in Maryland selected to participate in an interactive program entitled "Afghanistan Hearts and Minds," Harford Friends incorporated the program into the seventh-grade social studies curriculum, taught by teacher Lauren Redding. The "Afghanistan Hearts and Minds" adventure is a unique experience for students. Developed by Dina Fesler of the Children's Culture Connection, it takes participants inside Dina's life as a reporter who works to make a difference in an IDP (internally displaced persons)
NEWS
May 15, 2013
Calling all kids interested in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) related activities? The first annual HoCo STEM Festival is June 9, 1 to 4 p.m., at Howard Community College. This free community event is the brainchild of the Committee to Enhance STEM, a group of seven individuals with STEM backgrounds, including Ellicott City resident David Gertler, who want to stimulate and encourage students' interest in the emerging fields of science, technology, engineering and math.
NEWS
April 9, 2008
Two West Baltimore Middle School students were beaten with lacrosse sticks yesterday by a group of fellow students who asked the pair whether they were in a gang, the chief of the city schools police said. Chief Marshall T. Goodwin said that more than 10 eighth-graders at the school approached the two students, also eighth-graders, about 8:40 a.m. and asked whether they were "banging" - meaning part of gang. One of the targeted boys wore athletic shoes with red trim, which the assailants took as a gang sign, Goodwin said.
NEWS
May 4, 2008
The eighth annual Lacy/Graves Middle School Tennis tournament, for children in grades 6-8 will be held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 17 at River Hill High School in Clarksville. The tournament, which is designed to promote a healthy life, was started by Kimberly Lacy in 2000 as a Gifted and Talented project at Patuxent Valley Middle School. She dedicates the tournament to her late mother, Shirley Lacy, who died in 1999 when Kimberly was just beginning eighth grade at Patuxent Valley. Ernest Lacy, Kimberly's father, is a tennis coach for the Howard County Tennis Association.
NEWS
msaarbach1@gmail.com | April 25, 2013
Congratulations to the Dulaney High School Math team participants Minwei Cao, Jay Han, Casey Lim, Heetaek Lim and Lisa Ann Tang who were the winners of $1000 for their solution to the Moody's Mega Math Challenge recycling problem: Waste not, Want not: Putting Recyclables in their Place. Their 19-page solution was in the top 43 of 1,054 solutions submitted. In addition, Jay Han was the school winner of the American Mathematics Competition and scored well enough to compete in the second round competition - The American Invitational Mathematics Competition.
EXPLORE
February 13, 2013
Bel Air Lions Club members Madeline Hartman, left, and Pat Hogan flank the Lions Club International Peace Poster banner at the United Nations in New York, as Lions and the UN celebrated the 25th year of working together on this project. Middle school students from around the world submit posters with their visual interpretation of peace. Lion Hartman runs the program for the Bel Air Lions.
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