Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMiddle School
IN THE NEWS

Middle School

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | June 4, 1995
I am on record as not looking forward to the middle-school years.I have asked every mother I know if there is a way -- short of the institutionalization of my children or me -- that I can get out of being the parent of a middle-school child, and I have been told repeatedly that there is not.The years 11 to 13 are not pretty, but there is no way to get to blossoming young adulthood except through them.My dismay deepened the night of the middle-school open house for incoming sixth-graders. I was looking for an educational vision for children who have mastered reading and writing, and what I got was something that looked like parents' day at summer camp.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Anne Arundel County public schools will launch a pilot program in the new school year giving some elementary school students instruction in specific themes, including global studies, arts and the humanities, and the use of science and technology in society. Superintendent George Arlotto said Thursday each of the nine elementary schools that feed into North County High School will take part in the program, dubbed Triple E: Enhancing Elementary Excellence. It will begin Sept. 29, about a month after Monday's start of the school year.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | October 23, 1994
Floyd, a German short-haired pointer, knows all about drugs. But that's his job.The friendly dog sniffs out big bundles and even minute amounts of illegal narcotics during his hours working with the state police.He also has another job. He gives demonstrations of his tracking skills with his trainer, Tfc. Ed Karr.The duo delighted middle-school students who were attending a youth drug summit last week at Camp Ramblewood in Darlington."He loves people and loves food," Trooper Karr said. "He gets better treats than me and a chauffeur eight hours a day."
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and By Liz Bowie | August 12, 2014
Ridgely Middle School principal Susan Evans has been named one of six finalists for National Principal of the Year. Evans, a longtime Baltimore County principal, will be one of those honored during a September awards ceremony in Washington, D.C. Each finalist receives a $1,500 grant. The national winner will receive an additional $3,000 that can be used to improve learning at the school. The award is given by the National Association of Secondary School Principals to middle and high school principals.
NEWS
March 9, 1993
Middle school conference scheduledThe Maryland Middle School Association Spring Conference will take place at North Carroll Middle School, 2401 Hanover Pike, Hampstead, Friday from 7:10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m."Leadership for Social Reform" will be the topic of this year's meeting. The conference provides the background and setting for middle-level educators to discuss and share strategies, ideas and programs aimed at the middle-school student.It is estimated that 600 to 800 educators will gather to select from 90 presentations.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2004
On Wednesday afternoons, Bryn Mawr School sophomore Lindsay Hamilton can be found in the Roland Park branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library helping Masuma Islam with her homework. Sitting at a small table in the basement, Lindsay goes over Latin, math and other assignments with Masuma, who attends Roland Park Middle School. Lindsay also teaches her organizational skills and memory tricks. "I'm more comfortable asking Lindsay questions," said Masuma, 11, a sixth-grader from the city's Remington neighborhood who has been working with Lindsay since October.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2000
When Mayor Jonathan S. Herman asked the Sykesville Town Council what to discuss with Carroll's school superintendent today, members all had the same answer: air conditioning at the middle school. Charles I. Ecker will meet with officials from all eight towns in the next few months to discuss municipal concerns with the school system. Although temperatures are hovering near the freezing point, Ecker will probably hear a lot about heat today. Herman, a father of four school-aged children, will relay several complaints about temperature and air quality at Sykesville Middle School.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Mike Bowler and Howard Libit and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2000
EMMITSBURG - While Maryland children were enjoying summer vacation last week, many of their teachers and principals were in seminar rooms searching for ways to improve reading instruction. A primary concern: the lagging performance of middle-schoolers. Teams from middle schools in all 24 of the state's systems gathered at Mount St. Mary's College for the fourth annual Maryland Reading Network conference, while 100 public school principals focused on reading at a three-day session in suburban Baltimore.
NEWS
January 30, 1997
TEMPTATION KNOCKS LOUDLY on the doors of middle-school students whose parents are still at work when they return from school. These three or four hours provide a window when teen-age pregnancy happens, when juvenile crime soars, when children become crime victims, when teens use drugs. Without structure, these are some of the pitfalls awaiting latchkey children.Although it may sound childish to youths who feel like adults trapped in children's bodies, middle-school students could benefit from after-school programs that provide recreation and academic help.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | October 8, 1996
JOE AND HIS jailhouse lawyer, Paul, never know when to shut up.These two middle-school boys, who will some day talk themselves into a prison term for a parking ticket, can alibi and negotiate until you wish you were deaf.And that's exactly what they were doing as they attempted to prepare me for a worst-case scenario, report card-wise."A 'C' means average. It means you are like everyone else," said Paul, talking fast and following me around the kitchen as I tried to ignore him. "You want Joe to be like everyone else, don't you?
NEWS
BiJoe Burris | August 8, 2014
The Howard County Library will hold events Monday designed to help prepare kindergartners for classes; and middle schoolers for the next step in their education journey. "Kindergarten, Here We Come" is a 45-60 minute event to help acclimate students to the school system, including teaching them little tricks of the trade -- such as boarding a school bus. The event is slated for the East Columbia branch, 6600 Cradlerock Way, Columbia, on Monday at 10:30 a.m. 410-313-7700 . Also slated for Monday is "Movin' Up to Middle School," an event that helps rising sixth graders transition from elementary school.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
More than 50 Maryland middle-schools students have been building a house during a summer camp in Annapolis - not a routine task for teens and preteens. "I came here skeptical," acknowledged JJ Jennings, 13, a rising eighth-grader at the Key School in Annapolis. "Why am I paying to do labor?" To be fair, the house is a small-scale project - 210 square feet and sitting on trailer in the Key School parking lot. But that doesn't mean it's a not a big deal. Complete with solar panels and a rainwater filtration system, the compact home is designed to have the smallest possible carbon footprint.
FEATURES
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
Date: May 3 Her story: Abby Redding, 24, grew up in Severna Park. She is a licensed esthetician and is also a store manager at Sally Beauty Supply in Elkins, W.Va. Her father, Douglas Redding, and stepmother, Norann Redding, live in Severna Park. Abby's mother, Wendy Redding, and her partner, Diane Cowen, live in Glen Burnie. His story: Michael "Mike" Elliott, 24, grew up mostly in Severna Park but also lived in England, Colorado and Texas while his father, Berton Elliott of Pasadena, served in the Air Force.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
When the Arizona Diamondbacks designated reliever J.J. Putz for assignment on Friday, it brought back all sorts of memories. Obviously, you have to have a soft spot in your heart for anyone named Putz, even if he claimed in an interview with me several years ago that it was not pronounced the way you might expect. He said that it rhymed with "toots" instead of "mutts" and insisted that he had didn't remember anybody making fun of his name when he was in middle school. Of course, this didn't ring true with me and I went ahead and wrote a column that generated hundreds of message board headlines around the country that read "Schmuck interviews Putz," probably because none of us ever really graduates from middle school.
NEWS
Staff Reports, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
Anne Arundel County officials said Thursday they'll add three new school resource officers to patrol county middle schools beginning with the coming school year. County Executive Laura Neuman and Chief of Police Kevin Davis announced the additions Thursday at Old Mill North Middle School. Currently, county police have 21 school resource officers deployed in schools: 13 assigned to the county's 12 public high schools, two assigned to the Phoenix Academy, and six assigned to the 19 middle schools.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | June 8, 2014
Baltimore school officials want to attract more highly effective teachers and raise awareness about attendance in summer school after the percentage of middle and high school students successfully completing academic programs plummeted last year. The number of middle school students promoted to the next grade fell precipitously, according to data recently released by the school system, spurring questions about the effectiveness of the Building Educated Leaders for Life program. Building Educated Leaders for Life, referred to by its acronym BELL, a national model that had previously posted encouraging results, runs the city's middle school summer program.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | May 18, 1997
I CONSIDER MIDDLE school to be a holding pen for adolescents and respite care for their beleaguered parents, and my only complaint with this system is that they don't keep the kids overnight and on weekends.Eleven to 14 is a difficult age, and I wonder if educator Maria Montessori was not correct when she visualized sending these kids to work on farms until they had completed all the physical and emotional changes that make them so unpleasant in close quarters, such as your kitchen while you are making dinner.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun Reporter | December 2, 2007
In a cramped engineering classroom at the Johns Hopkins University yesterday morning, 40 students set out to solve problems. A firetruck had to be able to navigate through a forest. A school bus needed to traverse rural areas. A stadium had to be able to withstand a tropical climate. Upperclassmen engineering majors might have struggled to find solutions, but these students, none of whom was older than 14, found answers in about three hours.
NEWS
June 4, 2014
Karl Alexander and Doris Entwisle tracked nearly 800 children who began first grade in a Baltimore City public school in 1982 and found that only 4 percent of those who came from low-income families eventually earned a college degree ( "Baltimore study indicates family influences academic, work place success ," June 2). It was noted in the article that there are programs in other parts of the country that successfully help children from low-income families achieve academic success.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2014
Like many artists before her, Lisa Su has found inspiration from the intricate patterns and textures found in nature: the red seeds from the inside of a pomegranate, barnacles adhering to a rock. Yet the materials she uses are not beautiful or intricate. They are the stuff we throw away: old newspapers, egg shells, plastic bags, pencil shavings and light bulbs. Su's work, which ranges from the realistic bust of her friend to the abstract paper pulp sculpture that is reminiscent of barnacles, has earned her recognition as one of the top high school visual artists in the nation.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.