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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1999
Deep in the woods, his shotgun ready, Russell Allen sat quietly in his tree stand for 20 minutes watching two oblivious young buck deer not 10 yards away -- but he never pulled the trigger.The rules for the 28-day controlled hunt in Columbia's Middle Patuxent Environmental Area require killing two does before taking a buck. And Allen, a big, patient Cooksville resident, followed the rules.On the hunt's opening day yesterday, shooters killed 24 deer -- all but three of them does -- between dawn and the 11 a.m. deadline.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1999
Deep in the woods, his shotgun ready, Russell Allen sat quietly in his tree stand for 20 minutes watching two oblivious young buck deer not 10 yards away -- but he never pulled the trigger.The rules for the 28-day controlled hunt in Columbia's Middle Patuxent Environmental Area require killing two does before taking a buck. And Allen, a big, patient Cooksville resident, followed the rules.On the hunt's opening day yesterday, shooters killed 24 deer -- all but three of them does -- between dawn and the 11 a.m. deadline.
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NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1999
The dew is still thick on the ground when Jeff Duguay catches his first bird, a blue jay, in a giant net strung between two poles in one of Columbia's few remaining meadows.He holds the jay gently in one hand, securing a band onto one of its toothpick-thin legs before releasing it. In the next several hours, he will catch, band and release three more birds: another blue jay, a blue-winged warbler and a magnolia warbler.Banding birds is one of Duguay's many activities, part of his long-term research into the effects of suburban sprawl on the environment.
NEWS
By Alice Lukens and Alice Lukens,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1999
The dew is still thick on the ground when Jeff Duguay catches his first bird, a blue jay, in a giant net strung between two poles in one of Columbia's few remaining meadows.He holds the jay gently in one hand, securing a band onto one of its toothpick-thin legs before releasing it. In the next several hours, he will catch, band and release three more birds: another blue jay, a blue-winged warbler and a magnolia warbler.Banding birds is one of Duguay's many activities, part of his long-term research into the effects of suburban sprawl on the environment.
NEWS
January 23, 1998
The number of deer killed as of yesterday in Howard County's managed hunt in Middle Patuxent Environmental Area.Pub Date: 1/23/98
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 10, 1999
The killing of 14 more deer yesterday in the Middle Patuxent Environmental Area marked the end of this year's controlled hunt in Howard County -- 18 days earlier than expected.Philip C. Norman, natural resources specialist with the Recreation and Parks Department, said 134 deer were killed during 10 days of hunting. Officials had set a goal of 125 deer -- which Norman called "very conservative" -- and scheduled 28 days. The first day of the controlled hunt was Oct. 18."Having taken so many deer so quickly, we are sure that there are still ample deer in the Middle Patuxent Environmental Area," he said.
NEWS
October 31, 1999
Another 52 deer were killed by hunters last week in Howard County's Middle Patuxent Environmental Area as part of a controlled hunt.Natural resources specialist Philip C. Norman said 102 deer have been taken in the eight shooting days since the hunt began Oct. 18.Because the county set a goal of removing 125 deer from the 1,000-acre wooded refuge, the hunt may last only another day or two when it resumes Nov. 8, Norman said.County Executive James N. Robey said he decided to authorize the hunt because the deer population had grown far beyond the land's ability to support it, causing the animals to roam into residential areas and become a hazard on roads.
NEWS
July 18, 1999
The Middle Patuxent Environmental Foundation has announced that Joyce M. Kelly has succeeded Gerald "Jerry" E. Brock as chairman. Brock, vice president at the Route Co., will remain as trustee.Johanna G. Cote, senior vice president of NationsBank, succeeded Ken Paynter as secretary/treasurer.Charles "Chick" Rhodehamel of the Columbia Association remains as vice chairman.Kelly is president emeritus of the Wildlife Habitat Council, immediate past president of the Howard County Conservancy and trustee of the Maryland Environmental Trust.
NEWS
May 10, 1996
The Rouse Co. has transferred a 1,000-acre parcel known as the Middle Patuxent Environmental Area to Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks -- the department's largest acquisition.Recreation and Parks director Jeffrey Bourne yesterday confirmed that the transfer took place April 26. The land will become a managed wildlife refuge.The transfer of the land -- between the main part of Columbia and River Hill village -- will cost the county about $1.8 million. Some of that will be paid with a $205,500 grant from the state's Project Open Space.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 21, 1999
Howard County's campaign to reduce the deer population in Columbia's Middle Patuxent Environmental Area removed 50 animals during the first three days of the hunt this week, natural resources specialist Philip C. Norman said yesterday.The 28-day hunt will resume Monday and continue next month and in December until the county's goal of removing 125 animals from the herd is reached.Norman said 24 deer were killed Monday, the first day of the hunt, and 13 each Tuesday and yesterday. If the goal is reached before the full 28 days scheduled, the hunt will end early, Norman said.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1998
Bambi lives -- at least for the time being.Seven weeks after Howard County parks and recreation officials requested a managed hunt to control the deer population in Middle Patuxent Environmental Area in Columbia, County Executive Charles I. Ecker has yet to take a position on the proposal."
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1997
Columbia's deer better enjoy their Thanksgiving holiday. The days of easy suburban living -- with no predators save for cars and trucks -- are about over.Deer hunts likely will start Dec. 1 in the Middle Patuxent Environmental Area, a 630-acre wooded tract in west Columbia, Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker said yesterday. County parks officials have called a news conference for Monday to announce details.In recent months, the officials had feared that Columbia residents would reject hunting for ethical and safety reasons.
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