Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMiddle Passage
IN THE NEWS

Middle Passage

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1996
Middle Passage, the deadly journey of enslaved Africans to the Americas. Millions survived that horrific crossing. Yet, their story is rarely told.Tom Feelings, an illustrator of several award-winning children's books, understands why."It was so painful," he says. "The pain of the experience of black people is very heavy. Sometimes the pain of the present seems overwhelming, but the reasons why are rooted in the past."Mr. Feelings, 62, spent nearly a third of his life researching that past, collecting stories, opening himself up to a collective pain.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | July 20, 2006
Hometown -- Baltimore Current members --Michelle "LOVE" Nelson Founded in --2001 Style --performance poetry Influenced by --Lauryn Hill, Erykah Badu, Maya Angelou Notable --On her two albums, LOVE's Journey ... It Begins and justLOVEpoetryink Presents: LOVE's Journey ... The Middle Passage, Nelson injects her personal life into her music. The CD release party for The Middle Passage is Saturday. Quotable --"I take it as an opportunity to purge what's going on with me," Nelson said.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | September 22, 2005
In his eloquent autobiography, Olaudah Equiano describes in gripping detail his boyhood in Africa, his capture by slave traders and the hellish Middle Passage voyage in a slave ship across the Atlantic. The book became a sensation in 18th-century Britain and greatly aided that nation's abolition movement. Two centuries later, it became a classic text in African-American studies, a rare first-person account of the cruelties of slavery. The author is virtually a national hero in Nigeria, the land he claimed as his birthplace.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | September 22, 2005
In his eloquent autobiography, Olaudah Equiano describes in gripping detail his boyhood in Africa, his capture by slave traders and the hellish Middle Passage voyage in a slave ship across the Atlantic. The book became a sensation in 18th-century Britain and greatly aided that nation's abolition movement. Two centuries later, it became a classic text in African-American studies, a rare first-person account of the cruelties of slavery. The author is virtually a national hero in Nigeria, the land he claimed as his birthplace.
NEWS
By Elmer P. Martin and Joanne M. Martin | December 30, 1997
BLACK people who think that Steven Spielberg's latest movie ''Amistad'' is about black heroes taking their freedom by any means necessary are doomed to disappointment upon seeing the movie.While the film is loosely based on the true story of a group of Mende people from Sierra Leone, who in 1839 overpowered their Spanish captors aboard the slave ship La Amistad, it is largely a tale of white hero worship.The movie gives little time to the bloody slave mutiny led by Sengbe Pieh (called Joseph Cinque in the United States)
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | July 20, 2006
Hometown -- Baltimore Current members --Michelle "LOVE" Nelson Founded in --2001 Style --performance poetry Influenced by --Lauryn Hill, Erykah Badu, Maya Angelou Notable --On her two albums, LOVE's Journey ... It Begins and justLOVEpoetryink Presents: LOVE's Journey ... The Middle Passage, Nelson injects her personal life into her music. The CD release party for The Middle Passage is Saturday. Quotable --"I take it as an opportunity to purge what's going on with me," Nelson said.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | August 30, 1998
His eyes shut, his feet pounding pavement, Baba Kwame Ishangi contorted his body and sang about the dead yesterday at the Inner Harbor.About 70 people on Pier 5 listened and echoed Ishangi's words in the African tongue of Yoruba. They pounded drums and jingled bells to remember their ancestors, who passed -- shackled -- through town. They were slaves."This is about healing," said Adeyemi Bandele, 47, of Davidsonville, who organized the two-day "Remembrance: A Tribute to Our Ancestors," which ended yesterday.
FEATURES
December 11, 1997
Tonight, TV helps pave the way for tomorrow's opening of Steven Spielberg's latest film, "Amistad."On the Discovery Channel, "Slave Ship" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., repeats 1 a.m.-2 a.m.) is a new documentary about the horrors of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. At its center is the 1839 Amistad incident, a shipboard rebellion that is the subject of Spielberg's film. Also examined are the legal battles that followed and the effect of the rebellion on the abolitionist movement.The History Channel follows with another documentary, which Spielberg introduces, called "Ships of Slaves: The Middle Passage" (10 p.m.-11 p.m., repeats 2 a.m.-3 a.m.)
NEWS
By Karen Grigsby Bates | April 7, 1998
THE west coast of Africa is studded with slave castles, fortresses built to protect the masters of the slave trade and their investment property. Their jealously guarded property, of course, just happened to have been human beings. And no matter how worldly you are or how well-traveled, the first tour of these monuments to commerce and human misery is likely to stun even the most chatty visitor into silence. Walking through these large, echoing buildings, with their wide walls dotted with iron cannons facing the ocean, your logic recedes and your imagination takes over, populating the empty 20th century scenario with images from earlier centuries.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 15, 1991
In a hotel suite high above Fifth Avenue, someone has just put prize-winning author Charles Johnson on the hot seat.And he wants to get off."I'd like to get off this radiator," says Mr. Johnson to a photographer who's unknowingly posed him on the heat vent. He laughs good-naturedly. "It's getting hot."Of course, the same might be said these days about Charles Johnson himself. He is, at the moment, hot, hot, hot.Winner of the prestigious National Book Award last November for his novel, "Middle Passage," Mr. Johnson will learn tomorrow whether the book has been chosen for another important fiction prize, the National Book Critics Circle award.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | August 30, 1998
His eyes shut, his feet pounding pavement, Baba Kwame Ishangi contorted his body and sang about the dead yesterday at the Inner Harbor.About 70 people on Pier 5 listened and echoed Ishangi's words in the African tongue of Yoruba. They pounded drums and jingled bells to remember their ancestors, who passed -- shackled -- through town. They were slaves."This is about healing," said Adeyemi Bandele, 47, of Davidsonville, who organized the two-day "Remembrance: A Tribute to Our Ancestors," which ended yesterday.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1998
Bleary-eyed Baltimoreans peered from behind their doors or stood barefoot on their rowhouse steps and gawked. The early-morning sidewalk brigade, dog walkers and drug dealers, trash collectors and cops, paused in their business at the sound of drumming and chanting.The Interfaith Pilgrimage of the Middle Passage had come to town.A traveling history show of diverse Americans, supported by a drumming corps of Buddhist monks, is on a year-long, 7,000-mile journey to retrace the routes of the slave trade and ponder its tragic legacy.
NEWS
By Karen Grigsby Bates | April 7, 1998
THE west coast of Africa is studded with slave castles, fortresses built to protect the masters of the slave trade and their investment property. Their jealously guarded property, of course, just happened to have been human beings. And no matter how worldly you are or how well-traveled, the first tour of these monuments to commerce and human misery is likely to stun even the most chatty visitor into silence. Walking through these large, echoing buildings, with their wide walls dotted with iron cannons facing the ocean, your logic recedes and your imagination takes over, populating the empty 20th century scenario with images from earlier centuries.
NEWS
By Elmer P. Martin and Joanne M. Martin | December 30, 1997
BLACK people who think that Steven Spielberg's latest movie ''Amistad'' is about black heroes taking their freedom by any means necessary are doomed to disappointment upon seeing the movie.While the film is loosely based on the true story of a group of Mende people from Sierra Leone, who in 1839 overpowered their Spanish captors aboard the slave ship La Amistad, it is largely a tale of white hero worship.The movie gives little time to the bloody slave mutiny led by Sengbe Pieh (called Joseph Cinque in the United States)
FEATURES
December 11, 1997
Tonight, TV helps pave the way for tomorrow's opening of Steven Spielberg's latest film, "Amistad."On the Discovery Channel, "Slave Ship" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., repeats 1 a.m.-2 a.m.) is a new documentary about the horrors of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. At its center is the 1839 Amistad incident, a shipboard rebellion that is the subject of Spielberg's film. Also examined are the legal battles that followed and the effect of the rebellion on the abolitionist movement.The History Channel follows with another documentary, which Spielberg introduces, called "Ships of Slaves: The Middle Passage" (10 p.m.-11 p.m., repeats 2 a.m.-3 a.m.)
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1996
Middle Passage, the deadly journey of enslaved Africans to the Americas. Millions survived that horrific crossing. Yet, their story is rarely told.Tom Feelings, an illustrator of several award-winning children's books, understands why."It was so painful," he says. "The pain of the experience of black people is very heavy. Sometimes the pain of the present seems overwhelming, but the reasons why are rooted in the past."Mr. Feelings, 62, spent nearly a third of his life researching that past, collecting stories, opening himself up to a collective pain.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1998
Bleary-eyed Baltimoreans peered from behind their doors or stood barefoot on their rowhouse steps and gawked. The early-morning sidewalk brigade, dog walkers and drug dealers, trash collectors and cops, paused in their business at the sound of drumming and chanting.The Interfaith Pilgrimage of the Middle Passage had come to town.A traveling history show of diverse Americans, supported by a drumming corps of Buddhist monks, is on a year-long, 7,000-mile journey to retrace the routes of the slave trade and ponder its tragic legacy.
TOPIC
By SCOTT SHANE | June 20, 1999
ON JULY 24, 1863, three weeks after the Battle of Gettysburg, Union officers freed the inmates of a slave trader's jail on Pratt Street near the Baltimore harbor. They found a grisly scene."In this place I found 26 men, 1 boy, 29 women and 3 infants," Col. William Birney of the U.S. Colored Troops wrote to his commanding officer. "Sixteen of the men were shackled and one had his legs chained together by ingeniously contrived locks connected by chains suspended to his waist."The slaves were confined in sweltering cells or in the bricked-in yard of "Cam- liu's slave-pen," where "no tree or shrub grows" and "the mid-day sun pours down its scorching rays," Birney wrote.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 15, 1991
In a hotel suite high above Fifth Avenue, someone has just put prize-winning author Charles Johnson on the hot seat.And he wants to get off."I'd like to get off this radiator," says Mr. Johnson to a photographer who's unknowingly posed him on the heat vent. He laughs good-naturedly. "It's getting hot."Of course, the same might be said these days about Charles Johnson himself. He is, at the moment, hot, hot, hot.Winner of the prestigious National Book Award last November for his novel, "Middle Passage," Mr. Johnson will learn tomorrow whether the book has been chosen for another important fiction prize, the National Book Critics Circle award.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.