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By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | March 30, 1992
Despite a generally slow job market, Jeffrey Christian, president and chief executive officer of Christian & Timbers, a Cleveland-based executive search firm, is looking for managers, particularly those in the $100,000 to $500,000 salary range."
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NEWS
October 13, 2000
PATRICIA PAYNE'S departure as city housing commissioner only 10 months into the O'Malley administration is troublesome. It's overshadowed, though, by Mayor Martin O'Malley's failure, so far, to clearly enunciate a housing policy for Baltimore. The mayor inherited from the Schmoke administration a nettlesome public housing settlement with the American Civil Liberties Union. Mr. O'Malley would like to get rid of it but doesn't know how. Meanwhile, almost every aspect of management of the city housing authority has turned out to be a nightmare.
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NEWS
By David Kusnet | June 26, 1991
MAYOR Sharon Pratt Dixon's plan to eliminate from 1,200 to 2,000 middle managers contains powerful ideas not only for easing the fiscal crisis in her hard-pressed city government, but also for presenting the Democratic Party as something more appealing than its stereotype of free-spending, big-government liberalism.Dixon's payroll-cutting plan isn't traditional urban liberalism, but it isn't traditional cost-cutting conservatism, either.Rather than go after low-paid workers and the unions that represent them, Dixon is training her fire on the fat cats in municipal government.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1995
The planned Constellation Energy Corp. has established a severance package for middle managers and rank-and-file workers that is far more modest than benefits senior management will receive.The Constellation severance package, to be paid in a lump sum determined by length of service, will be paid to employees in the estimated 1,250 positions that Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and the Potomac Electric Power Co. expect to slash after their anticipated merger in March 1997.Under the severance plan, each employee will receive two weeks' pay for every year of service, or a minimum of eight weeks pay. Limited medical and dental benefits will also be included.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | June 17, 1991
CHICAGO -- If you don't have a mentor to guide your career, hire one.That was the advice given to women in the 1970s by women's employment advocates, who observed that men with mentors often get an extra boost up the corporate ladder.And it turns out they were right.A new study of women executives shows that if you're chosen as a protege to be guided by a more experienced, higher-ranking person -- you, too, will move up the career ladder faster.Having a qualified professional in your corner who shows you the ropes "actually does make a difference," said Lucy R. Sibley, professor and chairwoman of the department of textiles and clothing at Ohio State University.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1991
Mentors aid in careerIf you don't have a mentor to guide your career, hire one.A new study of women executives shows that if you're chosen as a protege to be guided by a more experienced, higher-ranking person -- you, too, will move up the career ladder faster."
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1995
The planned Constellation Energy Corp. has established a severance package for middle managers and rank-and-file workers that is far more modest than benefits senior management will receive.The Constellation severance package, to be paid in a lump sum determined by length of service, will be paid to employees in the estimated 1,250 positions that Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. and the Potomac Electric Power Co. expect to slash after their anticipated merger in March 1997.Under the severance plan, each employee will receive two weeks' pay for every year of service, or a minimum of eight weeks pay. Limited medical and dental benefits will also be included.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin | January 27, 1992
When Karen Bassett took a job as a computer systems analyst with the high-tech consulting firm Booz, Allen & Hamilton in Bethesda, the friend who referred her got a $1,500 check -- a bounty the company must routinely pay to find the right technical people.But while jobs go begging at Booz Allen, those mid-management generalists shed from big corporations are the ones who must do the begging if they're to find work."Companies that used to get 50 or 60 responses to a job ad for a manager now get 350. They don't even send a card or letter acknowledging your resume anymore.
NEWS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | February 24, 1993
They park their Chevy Blazers in front of the anonymous-looking office. They hang up their finely tailored suit jackets in the closet. Then they take out their Cross pens emblazoned with company logos. And fill out the unemployment forms.Here in Linthicum, at the state's 6-week-old Professional Outplacement Assistance Center, some of Maryland's 22,000 unemployed executives confront a new reality: They must either chase increasingly scarce managerial jobs or give up on their dreams of corporate success and find new (and usually less lucrative)
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin | January 27, 1992
TCWhen Karen Bassett took a job as a computer systems analyst with the high-tech consulting firm Booz, Allen & Hamilton in Bethesda, the friend who referred her got a $1,500 check -- a bounty the company must routinely pay to find the right technical people.But while jobs go begging at Booz Allen, those mid-management generalists shed from big corporations are the ones who must do the begging if they're to find work."Companies that used to get 50 or 60 responses to a job ad for a manager now get 350. They don't even send a card or letter acknowledging your resume anymore.
NEWS
By JOE PISANI | April 11, 1995
Greenwich, Connecticut. -- As the sun crested over the edge of the train station, a dozen or so commuters huddled on the concrete platform. These were the much-envied corporate survivors, the ones still standing after the cataclysm called ''downsizing'' swept the workplace like the plague during the early '90s.They even looked like survivors, clutching their morning papers and the tattered briefcases that had served them well throughout the mergers and acquisitions of the '80s. They were conducting their Monday-morning group-therapy session for disaffected bankers, brokers, computer programmers, attorneys and human-resources personnel, all of whom were suffering from the modern malady called ''job dissatisfaction.
BUSINESS
By KIM CLARK and KIM CLARK,Staff writer | October 8, 1993
Pre-employment tests may show hiring surgeIs this a new leading indicator?Dr. Jim Levy, president of CMC Occupational Health, a chain of five laboratories in the Baltimore area, says demand for pre-employment physicals and drug screening is skyrocketing.That means employers are doing a lot of hiring, he says.Usually, his labs are packed in March and April, when construction and other seasonal jobs start up.But this fall, the number of job applicants coming in for physicals and urine tests is up 25 percent from last fall, "and that is a little unusual," Dr. Levy said.
NEWS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | February 24, 1993
They park their Chevy Blazers in front of the anonymous-looking office. They hang up their finely tailored suit jackets in the closet. Then they take out their Cross pens emblazoned with company logos. And fill out the unemployment forms.Here in Linthicum, at the state's 6-week-old Professional Outplacement Assistance Center, some of Maryland's 22,000 unemployed executives confront a new reality: They must either chase increasingly scarce managerial jobs or give up on their dreams of corporate success and find new (and usually less lucrative)
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | March 30, 1992
Despite a generally slow job market, Jeffrey Christian, president and chief executive officer of Christian & Timbers, a Cleveland-based executive search firm, is looking for managers, particularly those in the $100,000 to $500,000 salary range."
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin | January 27, 1992
When Karen Bassett took a job as a computer systems analyst with the high-tech consulting firm Booz, Allen & Hamilton in Bethesda, the friend who referred her got a $1,500 check -- a bounty the company must routinely pay to find the right technical people.But while jobs go begging at Booz Allen, those mid-management generalists shed from big corporations are the ones who must do the begging if they're to find work."Companies that used to get 50 or 60 responses to a job ad for a manager now get 350. They don't even send a card or letter acknowledging your resume anymore.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin | January 27, 1992
TCWhen Karen Bassett took a job as a computer systems analyst with the high-tech consulting firm Booz, Allen & Hamilton in Bethesda, the friend who referred her got a $1,500 check -- a bounty the company must routinely pay to find the right technical people.But while jobs go begging at Booz Allen, those mid-management generalists shed from big corporations are the ones who must do the begging if they're to find work."Companies that used to get 50 or 60 responses to a job ad for a manager now get 350. They don't even send a card or letter acknowledging your resume anymore.
NEWS
By JOE PISANI | April 11, 1995
Greenwich, Connecticut. -- As the sun crested over the edge of the train station, a dozen or so commuters huddled on the concrete platform. These were the much-envied corporate survivors, the ones still standing after the cataclysm called ''downsizing'' swept the workplace like the plague during the early '90s.They even looked like survivors, clutching their morning papers and the tattered briefcases that had served them well throughout the mergers and acquisitions of the '80s. They were conducting their Monday-morning group-therapy session for disaffected bankers, brokers, computer programmers, attorneys and human-resources personnel, all of whom were suffering from the modern malady called ''job dissatisfaction.
BUSINESS
By KIM CLARK and KIM CLARK,Staff writer | October 8, 1993
Pre-employment tests may show hiring surgeIs this a new leading indicator?Dr. Jim Levy, president of CMC Occupational Health, a chain of five laboratories in the Baltimore area, says demand for pre-employment physicals and drug screening is skyrocketing.That means employers are doing a lot of hiring, he says.Usually, his labs are packed in March and April, when construction and other seasonal jobs start up.But this fall, the number of job applicants coming in for physicals and urine tests is up 25 percent from last fall, "and that is a little unusual," Dr. Levy said.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Paul Shread and Elise Armacost and Paul Shread,Staff writers | October 27, 1991
Primus Richardson, the county's emergency management officer for 14 years, learned Friday he was retiring -- after County Executive Robert R. Neall announced his departure at a press conference.Richardson said he had been told that his position was being abolished, but he knew nothing of his impending retirement until someone called him ahalf-hour after Neall's news conference on the budget crisis. Richardson's post is one of eight beingabolished as part of Neall's plan to reorganize the executive branch.
NEWS
By David Kusnet | June 26, 1991
MAYOR Sharon Pratt Dixon's plan to eliminate from 1,200 to 2,000 middle managers contains powerful ideas not only for easing the fiscal crisis in her hard-pressed city government, but also for presenting the Democratic Party as something more appealing than its stereotype of free-spending, big-government liberalism.Dixon's payroll-cutting plan isn't traditional urban liberalism, but it isn't traditional cost-cutting conservatism, either.Rather than go after low-paid workers and the unions that represent them, Dixon is training her fire on the fat cats in municipal government.
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