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Middle Ground

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NEWS
April 14, 2013
There has been a lot of talk lately about the role of government regulations. Many Democrats will argue that we don't have enough. Many Republicans will argue that we have too many. So who's right? I don't think either is inherently right or wrong. I liken the government to a boss, and the economy to a job. The way the government and the economy interact is like an employee/manager relationship. So we must ask, what kind of boss do we feel successful with? Do we like a boss who is breathing down our necks, one who gives us a set of guidelines and allows us to work, or one who is totally absent?
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2013
There is a saying in lacrosse that to enjoy postseason success, a team has to be strong up the middle. Kip Turner is familiar with that mantra about solid play from the goalkeeper and faceoff specialist, but the Chesapeake Bayhawks goalie said he is not carrying any additional pressure as the team prepares for Saturday's start of the Major League Lacrosse playoffs. "I think the only pressure that I have is from myself, to keep doing what I've been doing all season and to make the saves that I need to make," said Turner, a Severn graduate.
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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 17, 2005
BOSTON - Emergency contraception is the no-brainer in the abortion controversy. If taken soon enough, it can prevent 80 percent of unwanted pregnancies. Anyone looking to reduce the number of abortions should agree on reducing the number of unplanned pregnancies. There is still no peep from the Food and Drug Administration on putting Plan B, the after-the-act contraceptive, on the drugstore shelf. Still no Plan C, if C stands for the ever-elusive common ground. It's no secret that there's a solid anti-abortion majority in the Congress.
NEWS
April 14, 2013
There has been a lot of talk lately about the role of government regulations. Many Democrats will argue that we don't have enough. Many Republicans will argue that we have too many. So who's right? I don't think either is inherently right or wrong. I liken the government to a boss, and the economy to a job. The way the government and the economy interact is like an employee/manager relationship. So we must ask, what kind of boss do we feel successful with? Do we like a boss who is breathing down our necks, one who gives us a set of guidelines and allows us to work, or one who is totally absent?
BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART | March 14, 2004
IS YOUR wallet ready for spring break? An odd assortment of travel opportunities means that by the end of March, I will have already hit the road (or taken to the skies) four times this year. Great for beating the winter blues, not so great for keeping the wallet full. Worse, two of the trips are real budget killers. Our kids, ages 8 and 5, and I couldn't pass up tagging along to Walt Disney World while my husband attended a recent conference. And a dear friend's baby will be christened this month in London, where the American dollar won't buy a bag of chips from a street vendor right now. "We'll eat beans," my friend promised in an e-mail after I fretted about the exchange rate.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Trying to define a middle ground on the sensitive issue of school prayer, President Clinton proclaimed yesterday that nothing in the Constitution requires public schools to be "religion-free zones.""There are those who say that values and morals and religions have no place in public education -- I think that is wrong," the president told summer school students at James Madison High School in the Washington suburb of Vienna, Va. "This country needs to be a place where religion grows and flourishes."
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | August 9, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer, who earlier this week endorsed a Bush administration plan to open millions of acres of wetlands to development, now says he wants to find a "middle ground" in the environmental controversy.The governor's office late yesterday released a letter to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator William K. Reilly, in which Schaefer stresses that proposed rules for identifying wetlands must be tested in the field to determine their impact before they are adopted.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1997
At the least, the bureaucrats on the NCAA men's basketball committee have done a good job finding the cream in a field's crop. The past five NCAA champions, and six of the past seven, were No. 1 seeds.It's a 64-team tournament, however, and there's a crowded middle ground in between the sure winners and losers. Boston College went into the Big East tournament on the bubble but came out a No. 5 seed. Will anyone blink if Maryland, another No. 5, loses to the College of Charleston, No. 12 seed in the Southeast but No. 16 in the national rankings?
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1997
A Waverly woman erects a chain-link fence and plants flowering vines. A neighbor in the rowhouse next door takes a weed-whacker to the plants.An Essex woman, for years at the center of neighborhood tensions, sinks her teeth into another woman's neck. Witnesses compare the assault to a wild dog attack.In Columbia, a man kills a former neighbor. Police look for a motive -- and find one in a lingering dispute over a parking space.The Bible tell us to love our neighbors as ourselves, but not everybody has gotten the message.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1999
Spurred by a grass-roots movement, the city's planning commission has recommended a 12-month moratorium on new billboards in Baltimore, which advertising companies say could severely hamper their business.Anti-billboard activists packed a four-hour hearing Thursday night, arguing for an indefinite ban. The 12-month moratorium -- which the City Council land use committee will discuss Wednesday -- was a way for officials to stake out middle ground between activists and billboard businesses.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
In his new thriller, "The Third Bullet," novelist Stephen Hunter sets his sights on an American tragedy that's also the most famous gun mystery of all time - the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The questions surrounding the shooting as JFK rode in a motorcade in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, have never been fully put to rest. And the controversy is certain to intensify as the 50th anniversary of the assassination approaches this fall. As the novelist tells it, the decision to enlist his fictitious super-sniper, Bob Lee Swagger, to determine whether the gunman acted alone or as part of a conspiracy began as a joke.
SPORTS
Kevin Van Valkenburg | January 21, 2012
Dear Joe Flacco, It's been a bizarre week, hasn't it? You're one win away from playing in the Super Bowl, and I think I've read approximately 11 million articles -- written primarily by people living outside the Baltimore metro area -- that seem eager to inform me just how truly terrible you are at playing quarterback in the NFL. Seriously, if I hadn't actually watched you play football the past four years, if I'd been locked in someone's windowless...
NEWS
Advertorial Content by Bozzuto Homes | September 9, 2011
ADVERTORIAL CONTENT When comparing Baltimore andWashington, D.C., people often focus on the differences - in favorite sports teams, favorite foods and even brands of beer. This has created a regional rivalry that often leads area residents to commit to being either a “Baltimore person” or “D.C. person.” However, it doesn't necessarily have to be that way. In fact, you can be a Baltimore person and a D.C. person, enjoying the best of both cities from a neighborhood that's the exact midway point between downtown Baltimore and downtownWashington, D.C. - Bozzuto at Maple Lawn.
NEWS
March 30, 2011
So the new legislation "that would allow those caught with small amounts of marijuana to avoid punishment altogether if they can convince a judge that they used the drug out of medical necessity" is supposed to be a "middle ground on marijuana?" Get real. This is yet another excuse to put off what should have been done long ago: legalization, not just for medicinal use, but for all citizens. The fact of the matter is that marijuana is safer than alcohol or tobacco, yet its use can cause one to lose their job, be expelled from schools and universities, and even land in jail.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2011
This dry white wine displays full flavors and a creamy texture in a way that finds a middle ground between the style of Alsace and Italian wines from the same varietal. It offers generous flavors of pear, apples, honey and Asian spices. It has much of the appeal of a good chardonnay but without the overwhelming influence of oak. It's all about the fruit. Wine Find: 2009 Carmel Road Pinot Gris From: Monterey, Calif. Price: $18 Serve with: Salmon, swordfish
NEWS
March 1, 2011
The continuing standoff in Wisconsin between Gov. Scott Walker and Democrats in the legislature over his plan to sharply curtail state employees' collective bargaining rights has ignited a fierce debate about the value of public sector unions and the role they have played in the fiscal crises affecting state and local governments nationwide. But a much more low-key dispute in Anne Arundel County demonstrates that the question of whether government unions are good or bad is overly simplistic.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and JoAnna Daemmrich and David Nitkin and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2004
Like the rest of the nation, Maryland is growing increasingly polarized along party lines, results from this week's election show. Divisions between urban Democratic areas and suburban and rural Republican domains have grown starker, voting patterns reveal, presenting deep challenges for Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and other candidates seeking statewide office. Frederick County State's Attorney Scott Rolle, a Republican, pointed out that Maryland's congressional delegation is marked by extremes.
NEWS
By William F. Shughart II | December 21, 2009
O . - Would you spend countless hours developing a novel business method if you knew you couldn't protect it with a patent? Most of us wouldn't. Yet before the U.S. Supreme Court is a case that could have severe consequences for the incentives that fuel such job-creating innovations. While a ruling in Bilski and Warsaw v. Kappos isn't expected until next spring, let's hope the court doesn't fall prey to the arguments of Harvard Law School professor Lawrence Lessig and other supporters of the "open source" movement in computer software.
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