Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMiddle English
IN THE NEWS

Middle English

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 31, 1997
Bibliomaniac, n. - Someone with a lunatic's passion for acquiring books.Mumpsimus, n. - Middle English noun denoting an incorrigible, dogmatic old pedant which grew to mean any incorrect opinion stubbornly clung to.Inkhornism, n. - A literary composition that is overworked and unnecessarily intellectual.Bowdlerize, v. - To censor or purge a literary work by editorial omission of indelicate or potentially offensive passages. This word and corresponding noun, bowdlerism, were inspired by a popular 1818 edition of Shakespeare's works.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
[This is the post I intended to publish yesterday. I apologize for shooting a blank.] My estimable colleague Gary Kirchherr encouraged me the other day not to let up in my campaign against excrescences in the Associated Press Stylebook , and so, at the risk of boring you with what you have seen before, I press ahead. This time, and in a series of posts to come, I will experiment with sweet reason rather than hectoring.  One of the most venerable usage superstitions in America newspaper journalism, and it appears to be limited to American newspaper journalism,* is the belief that over  must only be used to indication spatial relationships, that it is illegitimate to use it in the sense of more than .  This is pure and undiluted codswallop.
Advertisement
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: TOUT Newspaper headline writers love the word tout , as they all short verbs (well, almost all), and it is a common piece of journalese in text when some public official is putting forth a proposal or praising his own accomplishments. You're not likely to see it very often outside newspapers, unless you go to the track.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your working vocabulary. This week's word: TOUT Newspaper headline writers love the word tout , as they all short verbs (well, almost all), and it is a common piece of journalese in text when some public official is putting forth a proposal or praising his own accomplishments. You're not likely to see it very often outside newspapers, unless you go to the track.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 4, 1993
Last night in the Fine Arts Center of Towson State University, the Towson Chamber Players presented what was essentially a French song recital. Song cycles by Ravel ("Chansons Madecasses") and Poulenc ("Banalites") were the genuine item in that they were written by Frenchmen, but even "Four Fragments" -- a setting of Chaucer in the original Middle English -- by the American Lester Trimble (who studied with Honegger, Milhaud and Boulanger in this country as well as in Paris) had an authentically French sense of color and economy.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | April 2, 1995
Havre de Grace. -- In the cool nights the libidinous crescendo of the peepers almost shakes the house. Cows, their hormones raging, ignore their nursing calves and bawl for the bull. Egg-laden rockfish are moving into the Chesapeake shallows. It must be April.T.S. Eliot, who never fed cattle through a February cold snap or spent a steambath August working in Baltimore, obscurely called April the cruelest month. Could he have meant that in an intellectual sense? Anyway, in the winter-deadened brain of an aging English major, when April comes old memories stir.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
[This is the post I intended to publish yesterday. I apologize for shooting a blank.] My estimable colleague Gary Kirchherr encouraged me the other day not to let up in my campaign against excrescences in the Associated Press Stylebook , and so, at the risk of boring you with what you have seen before, I press ahead. This time, and in a series of posts to come, I will experiment with sweet reason rather than hectoring.  One of the most venerable usage superstitions in America newspaper journalism, and it appears to be limited to American newspaper journalism,* is the belief that over  must only be used to indication spatial relationships, that it is illegitimate to use it in the sense of more than .  This is pure and undiluted codswallop.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
In a New Yorker cartoon from thirty years ago, a man turns to another in a bar and asks belligerently, " Hopefullywise ? Did I understand you to say hopefullywise ?" There you have the hopefully brouhaha encapsulated. The Wrong People, the sloppy, trendy vulgarians who tacked -wise indiscriminately onto adjectives were the same sort who would use hopefully as a sentence adverb. It's easy to identify the Wrong People: They belong to some group we like to look down on (advertising, say, or business people in general)
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2012
In a New Yorker cartoon from thirty years ago, a man turns to another in a bar and asks belligerently, " Hopefullywise ? Did I understand you to say hopefullywise ?" There you have the hopefully brouhaha encapsulated. The Wrong People, the sloppy, trendy vulgarians who tacked -wise indiscriminately onto adjectives were the same sort who would use hopefully as a sentence adverb. It's easy to identify the Wrong People: They belong to some group we like to look down on (advertising, say, or business people in general)
NEWS
August 31, 1997
Bibliomaniac, n. - Someone with a lunatic's passion for acquiring books.Mumpsimus, n. - Middle English noun denoting an incorrigible, dogmatic old pedant which grew to mean any incorrect opinion stubbornly clung to.Inkhornism, n. - A literary composition that is overworked and unnecessarily intellectual.Bowdlerize, v. - To censor or purge a literary work by editorial omission of indelicate or potentially offensive passages. This word and corresponding noun, bowdlerism, were inspired by a popular 1818 edition of Shakespeare's works.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | April 2, 1995
Havre de Grace. -- In the cool nights the libidinous crescendo of the peepers almost shakes the house. Cows, their hormones raging, ignore their nursing calves and bawl for the bull. Egg-laden rockfish are moving into the Chesapeake shallows. It must be April.T.S. Eliot, who never fed cattle through a February cold snap or spent a steambath August working in Baltimore, obscurely called April the cruelest month. Could he have meant that in an intellectual sense? Anyway, in the winter-deadened brain of an aging English major, when April comes old memories stir.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 4, 1993
Last night in the Fine Arts Center of Towson State University, the Towson Chamber Players presented what was essentially a French song recital. Song cycles by Ravel ("Chansons Madecasses") and Poulenc ("Banalites") were the genuine item in that they were written by Frenchmen, but even "Four Fragments" -- a setting of Chaucer in the original Middle English -- by the American Lester Trimble (who studied with Honegger, Milhaud and Boulanger in this country as well as in Paris) had an authentically French sense of color and economy.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.