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NEWS
October 7, 2010
Once again, witness the tail wagging the dog in our "special" relationship with Israel ("Too much, too fast for peace?" Oct. 7). In an effort to keep alive a moribund peace process, the U.S. is groveling before Israel attempting to appease a client state with favors so that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will extend a moratorium on the expansion of illegal settlements. But this, in effect, validates existing settlements on Palestinian land because these are not addressed. For any meaningful resolution of the conflict, the U.S. has to be a more impartial mediator.
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NEWS
By Jim Hecht | August 13, 2013
Secretary of State John Kerry has accomplished what many Middle East experts felt was not possible. As a result of his hard work and skill, Israelis and Palestinians are scheduled to resume negotiations on resolving their decades-long conflict in Jerusalem Wednesday. It is not surprising that Mr. Kerry has given the Israeli-Palestinian conflict a high priority. Like all of his recent predecessors as secretary of state, as well as past national security advisers, Mr. Kerry understands what most Americans do not - that ending the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is of great importance to U.S. national security.
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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 13, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The Soviet Union moved closer to re-establishing diplomatic ties with Israel yesterday after a 23-year break as each side backed off entrenched approaches to the Middle East peace process.Emerging from an hourlong meeting here with Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze said that the process for restoring the ties broken after the Six Day War in 1967 was "developing in a normal fashion.""We are not setting preconditions," he said.
NEWS
By Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi | July 18, 2011
The Quartet for Middle East peace met in Washington last week, and after the meeting a senior U.S. administration official said, "there are still gaps [between the Israelis and Palestinians]," and "more work needs to be done. " A new path to peace and better lives for Israelis and Palestinians are desperately needed, and the pro-democracy movements sweeping across the Middle East point the way. A key lesson of the Arab Spring - that everyday people can and must play a critical role to achieve fundamental change in the Middle East - also applies to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
NEWS
September 29, 1995
THE MOST TRENCHANT observation of the Middle East peace signing at the White House yesterday was made by an implacable opponent. Mustapha al-Liddawi, representative of the terrorist Hamas organization in Lebanon, told a Reuters correspondent in Beirut that the peace process "represents the international will and it will not fall in the years to come." He conceded that his enemy, PLO chairman Yasser Arafat, "has triumphed over the opposition."The peace ceremony over which President Clinton officiated bore that out. He was the host but Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak and Jordan's King Hussein attended, two leaders who have made their own peace with Israel, and want the entire Arab world to follow suit.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 30, 1991
MADRID, Spain -- On the eve of the historic Middle East peace conference, President Bush pledged the United States to act as catalyst in the difficult negotiations ahead but vowed it would not try to impose a settlement.Although administration officials have indicated that Washington would offer -- or withhold -- economic incentives to induce the parties to compromise, Mr. Bush avoided any statement yesterday that might agitate in the tense final hours before the conference begins."This is too sensitive a time," he told reporters.
NEWS
By RICHARD B. STRAUS | November 10, 1991
The Middle East peace conference in Madrid showed what is possible when a fight ends with the victor unable to accept he has won, the vanquished unwilling to admit he has lost and the referee insistent on keeping the outcome to himself.Of course, it helps if the winners are the neurotically insecure Israelis, the losers are vainglorious Arabs and the referee is the ever wily U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III.The unsentimental secretary of state has crafted a negotiating process based mainly on the cold calculation that the loss of two wars -- one cold and one hot -- had left the Arabs desperately weakened and therefore ready to negotiate an end to their decades-old bitter dispute with the Israelis.
NEWS
March 31, 1998
DENNIS ROSS, the chief American negotiator of the Middle East peace process, comes back without achievement after four days of shuttling between Israel and the Palestinians and neighbors.Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu resisted a plan for his country to give up 13.1 percent of the West Bank.Mr. Netanyahu is not keeping an agreement on pullbacks that he signed last year.The days of excitement about joint economic development that followed the Oslo peace accords ended with the May 1996 election in Israel that, by an eyelash, made the accord's greatest critic the nation's leader.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 26, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement that will be signed here Thursday has its roots in bare-knuckled diplomacy that helped topple an Israeli government, produced bitter strains between U.S. policy-makers and American Jews, and convinced Palestinian moderates they were assassination targets.In a new book about his years as secretary of state, 1989 to 1992, James A. Baker III details a three-year wrangle to foster a Middle East peace process that included banning an Israeli deputy foreign minister from the State Department and threatening to expel Israel's ambassador to Washington, hours of frustration with Syrian President Hafez el Assad, and shouting matches with both Syrians and Palestinians.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 27, 2000
WASHINGTON - According to every account of the recently suspended Camp David peace talks, Israel and the Palestinians have never been closer to ending their half-century of enmity than they were about 1 a.m. Tuesday. Both sides, but especially Israel, had made unprecedented concessions on the sensitive issues of Jerusalem, Palestinian refugees and the borders of a potential Palestinian state. When talks broke down two hours later, the gap between the negotiators seemed to change back into a canyon.
NEWS
By Michael Lerner | May 24, 2011
President Barack Obama is reported to have said to his advisors last week that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu would never make the concessions necessary for a peace accord. Well, we in the peace movement say, "duhhh. " If the president really understands this, it is time for him to go over the heads of the leadership in Israel, the West Bank and Gaza and directly to the Israeli and Palestinian people, with a full-blown peace accord that would show what the U.S. could enthusiastically support.
NEWS
October 7, 2010
Once again, witness the tail wagging the dog in our "special" relationship with Israel ("Too much, too fast for peace?" Oct. 7). In an effort to keep alive a moribund peace process, the U.S. is groveling before Israel attempting to appease a client state with favors so that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will extend a moratorium on the expansion of illegal settlements. But this, in effect, validates existing settlements on Palestinian land because these are not addressed. For any meaningful resolution of the conflict, the U.S. has to be a more impartial mediator.
NEWS
By Joel Greenberg and Joel Greenberg,Chicago Tribune | November 10, 2008
JERUSALEM - With a year-end target date for a Middle East peace agreement certain to be missed, international mediators pledged support yesterday for continued Israeli-Palestinian negotiations, and their envoy, Tony Blair, urged President-elect Barack Obama to make the peace effort a priority. Meeting at the Egyptian Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheik, representatives of the so-called Quartet - made up of the United States, the European Union, the United Nations and Russia - were briefed by Israeli Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas on talks launched nearly a year ago at a conference hosted by President Bush in Annapolis.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | November 20, 2007
Thirty years ago, on Nov. 19, 1977, I stood at Israel's Ben Gurion airport as Anwar el-Sadat's plane landed on the tarmac. The scene defied imagination, as the Egyptian leader embraced Israeli leaders. Hope was in the air. Suddenly, anything seemed possible. Mr. Sadat's bold move led to Israeli accords with Egypt and Jordan and the tantalizing hope of a deal with the Palestinians. But over the last seven years, the peace process has virtually collapsed. Now comes the Annapolis meeting - Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice's gamble that she can spark a new push for a Palestinian state living peacefully beside Israel.
NEWS
By Shibley Telhami | June 30, 2002
MOST OF the reaction to President Bush's speech on the Middle East last week focused on its content, especially his dual call for a Palestinian leadership change and the creation of a Palestinian state within three years. But regardless of the merits or feasibility of these substantive positions, the speech, above all, reflected the continuing tension within different corners of the Bush administration and how this tension can change the aims of policy. The aim of the speech had changed substantially by the time it was delivered.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 5, 2002
WASHINGTON - When a U.S.-sponsored Middle East conference opens this summer, most of the key players will find themselves being pulled in competing directions. The stated purpose of the conference is to promote a peaceful Middle East, pushing Israelis and Palestinians toward a resolution of their half-century-old conflict, laying the groundwork for a future Palestinian state and breaking down barriers to acceptance of Israel by the Arab world. Preparations begin in earnest this week when President Bush meets at the White House on Tuesday with Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and Wednesday with Jordan's King Abdullah II, Israel's neighbor and uneasy peace partner.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 1, 1991
MADRID, Spain -- With each having its own version of reality, Israel and its Arab neighbors turned the Middle East peace conference yesterday into a forum for stern lectures about past wrongs and competing claims of righteousness.Yesterday was the first opportunity for the belligerents to speak directly to each other, and the opportunity was used by representatives of Israel and its adversaries to make demands none of the parties could seriously expect the others to fulfill.Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir of Israel asked the Arabs not to focus on getting Israel to trade land for a formal peace.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 28, 1994
Middle East peace is too important for any terrorist to be allowed to destroy it, even a Jewish-American-Israeli terrorist.Kids are smoking more, the tobacco industry's contribution to the fight against over-population.The BSO is going to Japan and Korea, the very heart of the living European music tradition.Tonya should demand her money back.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 4, 2001
WASHINGTON - In another glimmer of hope for the tortured Middle East peace process, Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat has accepted U.S. proposals for a compromise between the Israelis and Palestinians - but with significant qualifications, officials said yesterday. Arafat told President Clinton by telephone yesterday morning "that he had accepted the president's parameters," said White House spokesman Jake Siewert. "At the same time, he expressed some reservations. What that means is that both sides have now accepted the president's ideas with some reservations."
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 5, 2000
WASHINGTON - Bloodshed summoned Dennis Ross back to the Middle East last month, on short notice and with high stakes. As usual, it promised him little but grief on arrival. The 51-year-old diplomat has been working to defuse hatred and mayhem for more than a decade, but they have seemed to best his efforts rather than vice versa. Many people think violence may have administered the coup de grace to Ross' longtime vocation and to the peace process. Ross is chief U.S. Middle East peace envoy, the job-site foreman for negotiations between Israel and its Arab neighbors.
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