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By Susan FitzGerald and Susan FitzGerald,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 2, 1990
Inflammation of the middle ear cavity, a condition known as otitis media, is the most common reason besides regular checkups for taking a child to the doctor, accounting for more than 31 million visits to doctors a year.An ongoing study by Gunnar B. Stickler, emeritus professor of pediatrics at the Mayo Clinic and Mayo Medical School in Rochester, Minn., has found that ear infections are parents' No. 1 health concern.The National Center for Health Statistics says there were 15.4 million episodes of acute ear infections in children in 1988, 10 million of them in youngsters under age 5.Health experts estimate an average of about $90 is spent for the treatment of just one episode of ear infection, for a total of more than $2 billion annually for physicians' fees, antibiotics and surgery for inserting ear tubes.
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By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Sun Reporter | June 14, 2007
Children's ear infections and their painful symptoms cause millions of visits to the doctor's office each year. "By age 7, as many as 90 percent of kids may have an episode of ear infection," says Dr. Robert Hsiao, a physician in Greater Baltimore Medical Center's Hereford office. Adults can also be affected, Hsiao says, often because of allergies. Swimmer's ear, another type of ear infection, can affect anybody who gets water in their ears, especially during the summer months when the humidity is high.
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By Cox News Service Staff Writer Sandra Crockett contributed to this report | September 1, 1992
Atlanta -- Not yet 2, Manny Major has taken virtually everyantibiotic doctors have for infections of the middle ear. With growing frustration, his parents have watched as each new prescription has failed to correct his problem."
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By Stacey Burling and Stacey Burling,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 17, 1998
Call them stealth bacteria.For years, chronic ear infections have presented a puzzle. Even when children exhibited all the symptoms of infection, doctors often were unable to grow bacteria from their middle-ear fluids. Now, though, researchers in Pittsburgh have found genetic evidence of active bacteria in the ears of such children.They suspect that the bacteria have learned to band together in a cooperative community called a biofilm, a sort of germ city that not only protects them from antibiotics but actually makes them much harder to detect than free-floating bugs.
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By Stacey Burling and Stacey Burling,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 17, 1998
Call them stealth bacteria.For years, chronic ear infections have presented a puzzle. Even when children exhibited all the symptoms of infection, doctors often were unable to grow bacteria from their middle-ear fluids. Now, though, researchers in Pittsburgh have found genetic evidence of active bacteria in the ears of such children.They suspect that the bacteria have learned to band together in a cooperative community called a biofilm, a sort of germ city that not only protects them from antibiotics but actually makes them much harder to detect than free-floating bugs.
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By Kathleen Curry and Kathleen Curry,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 9, 1993
The first time your child develops an ear infection, you panic.The second time, you nurture and worry but take heart that it will pass.The fourth time -- as you buy yet another bottle of the cotton-candy-pink antibiotic du jour and realize you've visited the doctor more than you've seen Junior's grandmother this year -- you start to wonder if maybe something is wrong with this picture.Where are all these ear infections coming from? Is your child cursed? You swear your mother never had to cope with this.
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By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Sun Reporter | June 14, 2007
Children's ear infections and their painful symptoms cause millions of visits to the doctor's office each year. "By age 7, as many as 90 percent of kids may have an episode of ear infection," says Dr. Robert Hsiao, a physician in Greater Baltimore Medical Center's Hereford office. Adults can also be affected, Hsiao says, often because of allergies. Swimmer's ear, another type of ear infection, can affect anybody who gets water in their ears, especially during the summer months when the humidity is high.
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By Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D. and Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D.,Special to The Sun | March 1, 1994
Q: My son has had three ear infections. Do you think I caused jTC them by getting water in his ears when I washed his hair?He really hates to get his hair washed and fights me when I do it even though he's only 2.A: Bathwater does not cause ear infections. Ear infections happen in a part of the ear canal called the middle ear.The eardrum stretches across the canal, preventing water from reaching the middle ear.Ear infections are caused by bacterial, and possibly viral germs.These do not get into the middle ear through the ear canal.
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By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer | January 19, 1993
Yesterday I saw a jogger with a scarf around his face. H looked silly, but the scarf could help to protect him from developing an earache.Hard breathing during exercise, especially in cold weather, can causeearaches and even temporary deafness. The symptoms are unlikely to be permanent, but they can be uncomfortable.A tube, called the Eustachian tube, connects each of your ears to the back of your throat. Cells that line your middle ear produce fluid that flows down the Eustachian tube and into your throat.
NEWS
By Kenneth Chang and Kenneth Chang,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 17, 2001
It was about the size and weight of a large paper clip. It may have been an ancestor of all modern mammals. A well-preserved, half-inch-long fossil skull of an animal that lived 195 million years ago in the Age of Dinosaurs possesses more advanced mammalian characteristics - more sensitive ears and a larger brain - than any of its known contemporaries, said scientists studying the fossil, which was found in China. The researchers, reporting in a recent issue of Science, named the animal Hadrocodium wui. Hadrocodium is Greek for "full head."
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By Kathleen Curry and Kathleen Curry,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 9, 1993
The first time your child develops an ear infection, you panic.The second time, you nurture and worry but take heart that it will pass.The fourth time -- as you buy yet another bottle of the cotton-candy-pink antibiotic du jour and realize you've visited the doctor more than you've seen Junior's grandmother this year -- you start to wonder if maybe something is wrong with this picture.Where are all these ear infections coming from? Is your child cursed? You swear your mother never had to cope with this.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service Staff Writer Sandra Crockett contributed to this report | September 1, 1992
Atlanta -- Not yet 2, Manny Major has taken virtually everyantibiotic doctors have for infections of the middle ear. With growing frustration, his parents have watched as each new prescription has failed to correct his problem."
HEALTH
By Susan FitzGerald and Susan FitzGerald,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 2, 1990
Inflammation of the middle ear cavity, a condition known as otitis media, is the most common reason besides regular checkups for taking a child to the doctor, accounting for more than 31 million visits to doctors a year.An ongoing study by Gunnar B. Stickler, emeritus professor of pediatrics at the Mayo Clinic and Mayo Medical School in Rochester, Minn., has found that ear infections are parents' No. 1 health concern.The National Center for Health Statistics says there were 15.4 million episodes of acute ear infections in children in 1988, 10 million of them in youngsters under age 5.Health experts estimate an average of about $90 is spent for the treatment of just one episode of ear infection, for a total of more than $2 billion annually for physicians' fees, antibiotics and surgery for inserting ear tubes.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 1996
Last weekend, my son was playing outdoors with other children. Suddenly, he came inside crying hard. He was holding one ear. He said that it hurt badly and that his voice sounded funny. He was hard to console for about 20 minutes, the the pain seemed to go away.What could have caused this? He had a cold, but he hadn't really been sick.It may take good detective skills to determine the cause of sudden severe ear pain in a healthy child.The fact that the pain disappeared as mysteriously as it arrived may be the most important clue in your son's case, but we'll get back to that.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | January 19, 1993
Q: I have a constant ringing in my ears. It is particularl annoying at night when I am trying to get to sleep. What causes this and can anything be done to make it go away?A: The medical term for the ringing noise heard by you, but not by others, is tinnitus. It can also have a buzzing, roaring, whistling or hissing quality.Although tinnitus may be caused by something as simple as a plug of wax in the ear, more often it is a symptom of a more serious problem in the middle ear, such as a hole in the eardrum, stiffening of the middle ear bones (otosclerosis)
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