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Middle Class Tax Cut

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By ELAINE CIULLA KAMARCK and By ELAINE CIULLA KAMARCK,Elaine Kamarck is a senior fellow at the Progressive Policy Institute. She wrote this commentary for Newsday | March 1, 1992
We are now into the tarmac phase of the presidential campaign -- when all subtlety and most thought is sacrificed on ** the altar of the 10-second television sound bite. Unfortunately, this happens even when politicians start out with the good intention of trying to deal with real problems of real people.Take the middle-class tax cut. This issue has been of central importance to both the Democratic and Republican campaigns. And yet, in the course of the campaign, the initial rationale for a middle-class tax cut has been lost.
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FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | January 22, 1995
Big changes are occurring in Washington, D.C. (motto: "Don't Laugh: You're Paying For It"). The Democrats, who had been in charge of Congress for thousands of years, have been thrown out into the street; you see hordes of them wandering aimlessly through traffic, freezing, holding crudely lettered signs that say "Will Invent Huge Wasteful Government Programs for Food."Congress is now in the hands of a genetically altered new breed of Republicans led by Newt Gingrich, a man who is motivated by a passionate commitment to political and cultural beliefs that were forged in the crucible of his youth -- when America was strong, and people had real values, and the streets were safe, and at school the other kids dunked Newt headfirst into the boys'-room commode because he was a dweeby little ball of pudge named Newt.
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NEWS
By ASOCIATED PRESS | February 1, 1992
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Democratic presidential contenders criticized President Bush's recession remedies and sparred over their own in campaign debate last night. "They just don't get it," Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton said of the administration. "This country's in trouble.""We are the alternative," said former Massachusetts Sen. Paul E. Tsongas. "We are the only alternative," he added for emphasis.For two hours, the five would-be presidents debated economics, education, health care and defense policy.
NEWS
By CARL M. CANNON | December 18, 1994
Washington -- As 1994 winds to a close, President Clinton and the Democratic Party are at a crossroads, with each trying to determine whether it would be better off trying to govern without the other.Mr. Clinton may be the titular head of the party. But he has instilled neither the sense of fear inspired by Lyndon B. Johnson nor the love inspired by John F. Kennedy, and during the autumn midterm elections, Democratic candidates, particularly in the South and the West, openly refused to campaign with him.The situation has hardly improved since Nov. 8. Many Capitol Hill Democrats privately blame Mr. Clinton for the defeat.
NEWS
February 2, 1992
Every day in every way the United States is going deeper into the hole by more than $1 billion. That works out to over $4.25 a day for every child, woman and man in America, or an estimated $1,565 per person in the course of a year.The federal deficit for fiscal 1992 ending next October is a record $399.2 billion, up 48 percent from the $269 billion of a year ago. Before President Bush's current term expires, the national debt will be pushing toward $4 trillion dollars. What a crushing burden on this and future generations!
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Staff Writer | December 13, 1992
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- The challenge for President-elect Bil Clinton at his economic summit this week will be to turn a cacophony of conflicting advice into a chorus of concern that can be used to sell his first 100-day action program.What started out as an economic initiative has become largely a public relations operation. The summit will not set policy. Instead, Mr. Clinton will use it as an opportunity to educate the public on the economic problems facing the country and prepare them for his program.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | January 22, 1995
Big changes are occurring in Washington, D.C. (motto: "Don't Laugh: You're Paying For It"). The Democrats, who had been in charge of Congress for thousands of years, have been thrown out into the street; you see hordes of them wandering aimlessly through traffic, freezing, holding crudely lettered signs that say "Will Invent Huge Wasteful Government Programs for Food."Congress is now in the hands of a genetically altered new breed of Republicans led by Newt Gingrich, a man who is motivated by a passionate commitment to political and cultural beliefs that were forged in the crucible of his youth -- when America was strong, and people had real values, and the streets were safe, and at school the other kids dunked Newt headfirst into the boys'-room commode because he was a dweeby little ball of pudge named Newt.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | February 11, 1993
Washington. -- In his first radio address from the Oval Office, President Clinton said that ''for the last 12 years our leaders haven't completely leveled with us.'' Make that 13.Mr. Clinton and his team, who used the transition to repudiate or blur campaign promises, have used their first weeks in power to slide away from the most important pledge made during the transition.In his confirmation hearing as director of the Office of Management and Budget, Leon Panetta endorsed a deficit reduction ratio of two-thirds spending cuts to one-third tax increases.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 4, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Senate Democrats unveiled a wide economic plan yesterday that would combine a middle-class tax cut with a longer-term "Marshall Plan for America" that would redirect defense spending to domestic needs such as bridges, roads and schools.The plan also calls, in the short term, for additional unemployment insurance benefits as well as grants and loans to state and local governments designed to create jobs in education, transportation and public safety."Our first priority in the new year should be to get the economy moving again," said Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, D-Md.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | February 27, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Ask Paul E. Tsongas what he would do about the middle-class tax cut currently being proposed by fellow Democrats in Congress, and he will tell you bluntly: Veto it.Ninety-seven cents a day, he mocks: What sort of response is that to the nation's economic blight? He favors long-term benefits for business over a quick fix for the consumer.Jerry Brown has another approach to tax reform: Scrap the entire federal progressive system and introduce a flat 13 percent levy on all income.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Great Tax Bidding War is now officially under way.Yesterday, in response to a Republican proposal for a $500-a-child tax break to virtually every American family, House Democratic leader Richard A. Gephardt proposed a tax cut for families earning less than $75,000 a year -- regardless of whether they have children.Tomorrow night, President Clinton will take to the airwaves in what aides are advertising as a "fireside chat" to endorse yet a third version of a middle-class tax cut."
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | February 11, 1993
Washington. -- In his first radio address from the Oval Office, President Clinton said that ''for the last 12 years our leaders haven't completely leveled with us.'' Make that 13.Mr. Clinton and his team, who used the transition to repudiate or blur campaign promises, have used their first weeks in power to slide away from the most important pledge made during the transition.In his confirmation hearing as director of the Office of Management and Budget, Leon Panetta endorsed a deficit reduction ratio of two-thirds spending cuts to one-third tax increases.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | January 14, 1993
During the campaign Democrats promised ''change,'' perhaps assuming that ''change'' is a synonym for ''progress.'' During the transition they have proven that it is not.Having promised a Cabinet that ''looks like America,'' Bill Clinton has cobbled together one that looks the way Americans fear that America is becoming: 13 of the 18 nominees are lawyers. Considerations of ''diversity'' (different chromosomes and skin pigmentations, not different ideas) have slowed the staffing of the administration, but it is off to a brisk start breaking promises.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Staff Writer | December 13, 1992
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- The challenge for President-elect Bil Clinton at his economic summit this week will be to turn a cacophony of conflicting advice into a chorus of concern that can be used to sell his first 100-day action program.What started out as an economic initiative has become largely a public relations operation. The summit will not set policy. Instead, Mr. Clinton will use it as an opportunity to educate the public on the economic problems facing the country and prepare them for his program.
NEWS
By ELAINE CIULLA KAMARCK and By ELAINE CIULLA KAMARCK,Elaine Kamarck is a senior fellow at the Progressive Policy Institute. She wrote this commentary for Newsday | March 1, 1992
We are now into the tarmac phase of the presidential campaign -- when all subtlety and most thought is sacrificed on ** the altar of the 10-second television sound bite. Unfortunately, this happens even when politicians start out with the good intention of trying to deal with real problems of real people.Take the middle-class tax cut. This issue has been of central importance to both the Democratic and Republican campaigns. And yet, in the course of the campaign, the initial rationale for a middle-class tax cut has been lost.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | February 27, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Ask Paul E. Tsongas what he would do about the middle-class tax cut currently being proposed by fellow Democrats in Congress, and he will tell you bluntly: Veto it.Ninety-seven cents a day, he mocks: What sort of response is that to the nation's economic blight? He favors long-term benefits for business over a quick fix for the consumer.Jerry Brown has another approach to tax reform: Scrap the entire federal progressive system and introduce a flat 13 percent levy on all income.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | February 27, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Ask Paul E. Tsongas what he would do about the middle-class tax cut currently being proposed by fellow Democrats in Congress, and he will tell you bluntly: veto it.Ninety-seven cents a day, he mocks: What sort of response is that to the nation's economic blight? He favors long-term benefits for business over a quick fix for the consumer.Jerry Brown has another approach to tax reform: Scrap the entire federal progressive system and introduce a flat 13 percent levy on all income.
NEWS
By CARL M. CANNON | December 18, 1994
Washington -- As 1994 winds to a close, President Clinton and the Democratic Party are at a crossroads, with each trying to determine whether it would be better off trying to govern without the other.Mr. Clinton may be the titular head of the party. But he has instilled neither the sense of fear inspired by Lyndon B. Johnson nor the love inspired by John F. Kennedy, and during the autumn midterm elections, Democratic candidates, particularly in the South and the West, openly refused to campaign with him.The situation has hardly improved since Nov. 8. Many Capitol Hill Democrats privately blame Mr. Clinton for the defeat.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | February 27, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Ask Paul E. Tsongas what he would do about the middle-class tax cut currently being proposed by fellow Democrats in Congress, and he will tell you bluntly: veto it.Ninety-seven cents a day, he mocks: What sort of response is that to the nation's economic blight? He favors long-term benefits for business over a quick fix for the consumer.Jerry Brown has another approach to tax reform: Scrap the entire federal progressive system and introduce a flat 13 percent levy on all income.
NEWS
February 2, 1992
Every day in every way the United States is going deeper into the hole by more than $1 billion. That works out to over $4.25 a day for every child, woman and man in America, or an estimated $1,565 per person in the course of a year.The federal deficit for fiscal 1992 ending next October is a record $399.2 billion, up 48 percent from the $269 billion of a year ago. Before President Bush's current term expires, the national debt will be pushing toward $4 trillion dollars. What a crushing burden on this and future generations!
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