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By Sharon Hornberger | July 14, 1991
During the days of vaudeville, the expression was, "Will it play in Peoria?" The question meant: Will this be accepted by Middle America?The expression may well be changed to, "Will it play in Carroll County?"The decade of the '80s brought many changes to the greater Baltimore region and to Carroll County in particular.The U.S. Census Bureau recently released figures for the Baltimore region, which includes the six jurisdictions of Baltimore City and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Harford, Howard and Carroll counties.
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | December 8, 2013
Critical analysis of Obama administration foreign policy is rendered more difficult by America's neo-isolationist mood. The bloody conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have left most Americans in no mood for further military engagements, particularly in regions long known for their tribal and sectarian strife. The angst is spread far beyond the anti-war left, too. Middle America 's sons and daughters have witnessed enough carnage to make future adventurism a dubious proposition.
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FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2003
PEORIA, Ill. - It's a tricky business, taking the pulse of Peoria. As in any town, opinions vary - from the tugboat operators guiding barges up the Illinois River to the fresh-faced boys, lean as cornstalks, in town for the state high school basketball tournament to the Lebanese restaurant chef whose eyes dart between the war on television and the parsley she is chopping for tomorrow's tabouli. Go to the One World Cafe, a coffee house on the fringe of Bradley University and you're likely to hear one thing.
NEWS
March 3, 2013
I loved the lengthy article on rising gas prices ("Pumping up the price," Feb. 26). Several years ago, when gas was approaching $2 a gallon, the headlines were screaming how middle America was hocking their wedding rings to be able to put gas in their cars, and what was George W. Bush going to do about it? Yet, now, as the price is approaching $4 a gallon, nowhere in your article was the current president's name mentioned. Why is that? D. Pazourek, Sparks
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 15, 1993
Catastrophic flooding is something that is supposed to happen in Bangladesh, not Middle America.President and Congress are very grateful to Ol' Man River. He will take the rap for busting the budget.Rule No. 1 in peace-keeping: Don't go after a warlord unless you get him.Thank goodness the All-Star business is finished and we can get back to baseball.
NEWS
March 3, 2013
I loved the lengthy article on rising gas prices ("Pumping up the price," Feb. 26). Several years ago, when gas was approaching $2 a gallon, the headlines were screaming how middle America was hocking their wedding rings to be able to put gas in their cars, and what was George W. Bush going to do about it? Yet, now, as the price is approaching $4 a gallon, nowhere in your article was the current president's name mentioned. Why is that? D. Pazourek, Sparks
NEWS
Susan Reimer | December 13, 2010
Middle America, the mythical heartland where God, country and family are held in sacred esteem, appears to be turning its back on marriage, according to a new study. The 2010 "State of Our Unions," released last week by the National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia, reports that the 58 percent of adults who have a high school diploma and possibly some further education (short of a four-year degree) are increasingly disenchanted with marriage, are more likely to divorce and are more likely to have children out of wedlock, circumstances that align them with the poorest Americans and the most fragile families.
NEWS
By Charlyne Varkonyi Schaub and By Charlyne Varkonyi Schaub,Special to the Sun | February 9, 2003
Make no mistake: Mark Mayfield is no Marian McEvoy. Mayfield, the editor in chief of House Beautiful who replaced McEvoy in July, comes off as a down-to-earth guy who just happens to have really good taste. McEvoy never pretended to be down-to-earth. She partied with the "A" list and made the International Best Dressed List along with Halle Berry, Kate Moss and Queen Rania of Jordan. She came by it naturally -- her journalistic roots were in the fashion-focused world of Elle Decor and W magazine.
NEWS
July 26, 2003
AMONG THE LARGEST 500 companies, more than 300 - and eight of the top 10 - have had policies against discrimination based on sexual orientation. But when one more firm recently adopted such a policy, it was front-page national news. That's because when Wal-Mart speaks - for better or worse - America pays attention. World-conquering size does that. The 41-year-old firm is now the world's largest corporation and private employer, with more workers in uniform (1.3 million worldwide) than the U.S. Army.
FEATURES
By Tom Jicha and Tom Jicha,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | April 29, 2005
The military drama JAG epitomizes the disconnect between Hollywood and Middle America. The show ends its 227-episode run tonight still a fan favorite and a pariah in the industry. Despite surviving 10 seasons, the series and its actors have never been even nominated for an Emmy. Emmys don't keep series on the air for a decade; ratings do, so creator-executive producer Donald P. Bellisario said he took the snubs from his peers in stride. "Hollywood is a very liberal community that doesn't have a great affinity for the military.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | December 13, 2010
Middle America, the mythical heartland where God, country and family are held in sacred esteem, appears to be turning its back on marriage, according to a new study. The 2010 "State of Our Unions," released last week by the National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia, reports that the 58 percent of adults who have a high school diploma and possibly some further education (short of a four-year degree) are increasingly disenchanted with marriage, are more likely to divorce and are more likely to have children out of wedlock, circumstances that align them with the poorest Americans and the most fragile families.
NEWS
April 26, 2010
Middle class. Middle of the road. Middle America. Mid-market. Where have they gone? These once meaningful terms, describing the many great strengths that derive from America's proud tradition of moderation, remain in the language but are slipping from reality. It's no news that the middle class and middle-of-the-road politics have taken big hits in recent years. However, does the decline of all of these "middles" reflect a common, broader truth about how the United States has changed during the last few decades?
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | October 17, 2008
NEW YORK - Whatever their other contributions to politics and the nation, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin and Sen. Barack Obama have been crack for the news business. Across the spectrum, viewership, Internet traffic and readership are way up during this interminable election season. But what happens when it's over? Will there be enough news to sustain the bounce? And that persistent obstacle: How can the mainstream media improve their image? These were some of the questions addressed by panelists at a Time Warner media summit here this week.
FEATURES
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | March 22, 2006
Scott Greatorex cannot wait to sail the Chesapeake Bay in his new 25-foot luxury yacht with gorgeous teak paneling, two cabins, a galley, a flat-screen TV and enough nautical gadgets to man the vessel alone if he so desired. He can already picture overnight stays and strolls with his family along Main Street stores this spring since the Wind Orchid also happens to be docked on an enviable piece of real estate on Spa Creek near the heart of historic Annapolis. To do it on his own, it would cost $180,000 just to buy the same Catalina sailboat, plus thousands more in maintenance, slip fees, insurance and other costs -- making such a luxurious hobby far out of reach for a 49-year-old manager at NASA.
NEWS
By Rachel Ellner and Rachel Ellner,Special to the Sun | September 9, 2005
Does the best New England clam chowder actually come from Maryland's Eastern Shore? Sounds like heresy, but more than a few fans of prepared chowder think it's true. For that they can thank Robert Bredimus, a 63-year-old food chemist who began taming clams for Middle American tastes more than three decades ago. "There are good clam notes and bad clam notes," Bredimus explains. "The bad ones are amines -- that's what's fishy --and sulfide, which is rotten-eggy. There also can be iodine and iron tastes.
FEATURES
By Tom Jicha and Tom Jicha,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | April 29, 2005
The military drama JAG epitomizes the disconnect between Hollywood and Middle America. The show ends its 227-episode run tonight still a fan favorite and a pariah in the industry. Despite surviving 10 seasons, the series and its actors have never been even nominated for an Emmy. Emmys don't keep series on the air for a decade; ratings do, so creator-executive producer Donald P. Bellisario said he took the snubs from his peers in stride. "Hollywood is a very liberal community that doesn't have a great affinity for the military.
NEWS
April 26, 2010
Middle class. Middle of the road. Middle America. Mid-market. Where have they gone? These once meaningful terms, describing the many great strengths that derive from America's proud tradition of moderation, remain in the language but are slipping from reality. It's no news that the middle class and middle-of-the-road politics have taken big hits in recent years. However, does the decline of all of these "middles" reflect a common, broader truth about how the United States has changed during the last few decades?
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | October 7, 1991
With tonight's movie-length premiere of NBC's "I'll Fly Away" (reviewed elsewhere today), the networks new fall shows have almost all appeared. (Exceptions include CBS' "Palace Guard," due Oct. 18, and the revamped "Carol Burnett Show" on Nov. 1).Oh, well, close enough for TV. It's time for Media Monitor to ask: What do you think so far?Specifically, before any shows are canceled -- whoops! too late, "The Ron Reagan Show" will go away at the end of the month -- we'd like to know what one new show readers like the best and which you like the least.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary McNamara and Mary McNamara,Los Angeles Times | May 2, 2004
HOLLYWOOD -- In 1988, when Divine showed up at the pop-culture cocktail party, escorted by John Waters and the cast of Hairspray the movie, people were not quite sure what to do with her ... him ... her. Dubbing the film a "cult classic" made things a little easier -- cross-dressers and drag queens were traditional hallmarks of a "cult classic," along with zombies, incestuous relationships and ax murderers. Now, of course, Hairspray is a Broadway smash, billed as the Feel-Good Musical of the Century, and Harvey Fierstein reprising Divine's Edna Turnblad is considered much more charming than avant-garde -- the man served as the unofficial grand marshal at last year's Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun Staff | April 4, 2004
They call themselves Grobanites. And 60 of them recently crammed into a room at Sabatino's restaurant in Baltimore's Little Italy for dinner and a love-in. The object of their desire: Josh Groban, a pop singer with a voice that makes their hearts soar and their tears flow. Amid dishes of pasta, they swapped photos, shared stories and bonded. In this world, the person next to you -- even if she was a complete stranger 10 minutes ago -- instantly became your best friend. This cell of the Josh Groban fan club had more than just the singer in common: They were mostly white, over 45 and female.
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