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Middle Age

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NEWS
By Ted Kruse | November 17, 2013
Today, I became old. The Federal government told me so. An official letter from the Social Security Administration announced my eligibility for Medicare. The envelope also contained a red, white and blue Medicare card. The patriotic color theme continued in a 32-page booklet explaining Medicare in age-appropriate 14-point type. The official pronouncement of being declared old is a reminder that life is full of rites of passage: starting school, getting a driver's license, graduating from high school and getting married.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
Officials at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore are investigating the death of a middle-aged female chimpanzee that was found lifeless in an enclosure early Wednesday morning, several hours after being anesthetized for a scheduled physical exam. Whether the anesthesia was a factor in the animal's death will be reviewed as part of a necropsy, or animal autopsy, zoo officials said. The 21-year-old primate, named Renee, was among the first group of chimpanzees to inhabit the zoo's Chimpanzee Forest following its opening in 1995.
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FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | September 10, 1990
Generally speaking I do not eavesdrop on other people's conversations. But sometimes a sentence drifts into earshot that is so provocative it compels you to drop whatever you're thinking and listen.Take, for instance, the following dialogue between two women changing their clothes after a workout at a health club:"I hate getting older, don't you?""Yeah. I'd give anything to be young again.""Me too. I can't believe I'm thirty. Middle age really is the pits."Well, I suppose you could make a case that everything in life, as Einstein was fond of pointing out, is relative -- up to and including one's idea of when youth ends and middle age begins.
NEWS
By Ted Kruse | November 17, 2013
Today, I became old. The Federal government told me so. An official letter from the Social Security Administration announced my eligibility for Medicare. The envelope also contained a red, white and blue Medicare card. The patriotic color theme continued in a 32-page booklet explaining Medicare in age-appropriate 14-point type. The official pronouncement of being declared old is a reminder that life is full of rites of passage: starting school, getting a driver's license, graduating from high school and getting married.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1994
It's not magic, it's middle age.Kiki Shaw is disappearing, bit by bit. Co-workers wander into her office to borrow something from her desk, not noticing that she's sitting right there. Even her cat walks right through her foot! What's happening is Kiki is turning 40, which -- if you're a woman in America -- means people start looking past you, talking over you, and otherwise making you feel invisible.That is the running theme in "Now You See Her" (as in "now you don't"). All the female characters are fading out, metaphorically or otherwise: Kiki, who writes questions for a "Jeopardy"-like game show; her friends Nora and Collier; Les, the woman married to Collier's boyfriend; even Kiki's flamboyant mother, Gen.tTC Author Whitney Otto's light, lyrical touch with the ebb and flow of her characters' lives will be familiar to those who made her first novel, "How To Make an American Quilt," one of those wonderful surprises that emerge out of the publishing world to commercial and critical success.
BUSINESS
By Peter Kerr and Peter Kerr,New York Times News Service | August 28, 1991
For the first time since they began arriving after World War II, the 78 million Americans of the "baby boom" are being courted by large numbers of marketers not for their seemingly endless youth but for their encroaching middle age.As the baby boomers begin to bulge, sag and squint their way into their mid-40s, companies are striking gold with products that offer a bit of youth to these aging yuppies -- a group that demographers are calling grumpies, for...
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Reporter | November 5, 2006
A new feature about staying young, growing old and what happens in between A few weeks ago, podiatrist John Senatore stood near Mile 22 of the Baltimore Marathon, cheering loudly for the runners - quite a few of whom were his patients at Union Memorial Hospital's Sports Medicine Center. Today he's in New York to encourage his wife, who is running her first marathon at the age of 45. Caroline Senatore joins an ever-growing group of middle-aged long distance runners. Last year, nearly 17,000 of the New York Marathon's 36,856 finishers were in their 40s and 50s. In the months they spent preparing for a 26.2-mile race, many learned that training included managing tendinitis, knee problems and heel pain.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 9, 1996
After throwing their demographic weight around for decades, baby boomers, that most self-involved of generations, may finally have met a challenge they can't bully their way past:Middle age.The oldest boomers are turning 50 this year, a breathtaking milestone when you belong to a generation that has relentlessly celebrated its youth.Middle age? When you spent your teens advising the world never to trust anyone over 30?This is a generation in denial. Sociologists and marketers say that boomers, bathed in society's attention from their childhoods, will begin to see themselves fading as the favored market for advertisers, the lead characters in movies, the rising business executives.
FEATURES
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | January 18, 2003
He's thinking about getting a tattoo, but cutting back on gigs with his rock band. He's as buff as ever, but eating more Lean Cuisine. He's juggling an impossible job and a big brood of kids, but wondering how long he can keep all those balls up in the air. Mayor Martin O'Malley turns 40 today, reaching that milestone where even a man who exudes youthful energy, drive and swagger can begin to feel the creep of age and the weight of ever-growing responsibility....
NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow and Kevin J. Sullivan | August 6, 2012
The way politicians talk, one would think that the only issues that matter to Americans over 55 or 60 are Social Security and Medicare. Of course, the future of these programs is enormously important to the well-being of older citizens (and everyone else who one day will be old), and their runaway costs threaten the nation's long-term budgetary health. But most of the 60 million Americans between the ages of 55 and 75 have other things on their minds than what will happen to these two huge entitlement programs.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
More than 1,700 Marylanders had enrolled in health insurance coverage through a new state marketplace from Oct. 1 through Nov. 9, and of those who signed up in October, most were women and middle-aged, state health officials said. The enrollment total was a 36 percent increase in a week. Along with its weekly update of enrollment and application processing numbers, Maryland Health Connection released demographic information on early enrollees for the first time. Women made up 55 percent of the enrollees.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | January 17, 2013
Editor: Here's a big question: When does old age begin? I have the answer. And, I got it by surprise. Recently, I saw my physician for a routine examination and health review. During the visit she declared for the record, that I made it to old age. On May 4, 2012, I unceremoniously turned 65 without notion of such a venerable accomplishment. According to the good doctor, 65 human years on earth is a medical milestone. Until the elderly moniker was consigned to me, things were going along fine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2012
In 1994, at the age of 26, “Hairspray” sweetheart Ricki Lake had one of the hottest daytime talk shows in the history of television. With a daily audience of 5.8 million viewers after only one year on-air, “Ricki Lake” was second only to “Oprah” among all syndicated talk shows, and she was beating “Oprah” among younger viewers. But today, the 43-year-old performer, who returns to talk TV this month with “The Ricki Lake Show,” looks back and says: If only she had been able to understand what she had and what she might have done with all her clout at the time.
NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow and Kevin J. Sullivan | August 6, 2012
The way politicians talk, one would think that the only issues that matter to Americans over 55 or 60 are Social Security and Medicare. Of course, the future of these programs is enormously important to the well-being of older citizens (and everyone else who one day will be old), and their runaway costs threaten the nation's long-term budgetary health. But most of the 60 million Americans between the ages of 55 and 75 have other things on their minds than what will happen to these two huge entitlement programs.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | December 21, 2011
Terry Reed asks me to remove the cash-filled cardboard coffee cup from the split-hook prosthetic claw that serves as his right hand. "Just put it in my coat pocket, please," he says, as breezes from the brisk traffic along President Street add some wind chill to the dropping temperature. President Street is where Terry Reed does most of his panhandling, and he's hard to miss — a thin man who stands on the solid white line that marks the left-turn lane. He wears a dark blue winter coat and a pair of pants that stop at his knees, revealing chocolate-colored prosthetic limbs below that.
EXPLORE
August 18, 2011
Interested in martial arts? How about yoga? Would a class in alternative medicine appeal to you? What if a place offered all of these, along with a well-equipped fitness center? Such places exist in Baltimore County. They're called senior centers. The leading edge of the baby boom generation crossed the age-60 threshold of senior center membership a few years ago. Now, men and women approaching retirement age are looking to incorporate the senior centers into their active lifestyles.
FEATURES
By Alice Kahn and Alice Kahn,San Francisco Chronicle XHC B | May 29, 1991
It happens. If you live past 30, one day you wake up and and ask the metaphysical equivalent of: Is it soup yet? Am I middle-aged? Me?The concept of middle age has always been a muddle. Now, as the baby boom marches through it, middle aging becomes a topic of momentous demographic, economic and social importance.One has even compared it, in historic significance, to the closing of the frontier. Clearly, there are more and more people out there looking like Wallace Shawn and fewer looking like Johnny Depp.
NEWS
By JOHN E. McINTYRE | June 5, 1994
The children were the first in the water at the swim club this year -- noon on the Saturday before Memorial Day. It has become their place: They frisk and cavort in the water as exuberantly as dolphins in the sea; they have friends with whom they play "Marco Polo" or dive for pennies or marbles. Once we arrive and they are launched, I scarcely see them again.The age of 10 brings advantages to adults, too. I get credit for being a dutiful and affectionate parent merely for going along and springing for hot dogs (relish AND onions, ketchup AND mustard on one, ketchup AND mustard on the other)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
The departure last week of Marianne Banister from WBAL-TV after 15 years of co-anchoring a team that always finished first or second in its time period raised big questions about the changing face of television news in Baltimore. In the past year and half, several long-time anchors have signed off the local airwaves, including Sally Thorner at WJZ, and Mary Beth Marsden at WMAR. By long-time, we're talking 15 years or more of coming into Baltimore homes every night with the local news.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
When the Roots joined "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon" last year, fans cried foul. What would they be doing in the tacky Siberia that late night can be? Slumming with "Stump the Band" skits? The gig smacked of selling out. Most alarmingly, it would at least spell reduced touring for a group that was accustomed to being on the road 42 weeks a year. "I definitely felt the heat," said band leader and drummer Ahmed "Questlove" Thompson. But in that time, Thompson hasn't turned into Doc Severinsen.
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