Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMicrowave
IN THE NEWS

Microwave

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | January 25, 2011
Sometimes you look at a decades-old photo of yourself at the beach and are struck by the thought that you should have worn more skimpy two-pieces while you had the chance. Sometimes you watch a mystery in a movie theater and realize you just don't enjoy it as much as you would at home, where you can use the remote to go back if you missed a clue. And sometimes you go to heat up your soup in the office microwave and glance at the controls and think, "What is this country coming to?" In my company's newly remodeled kitchenette sit two General Electric microwave ovens (because heaven knows we efficient Americans cannot be expected to wait while someone else flash-cooks his meal in less than two minutes)
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Abigail Green, For The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Recent studies have shown that many commercial baby foods are lacking in nutrition and full of things your baby doesn't need, like sugar and preservatives. But is homemade worth the hassle? We weighed the pros and cons. Pro: It's easy. Pureeing carrots is a far cry from making coq au vin . Steaming, mashing, stirring - that's as complicated as baby food needs to be. Con: It's time consuming. Yes, it does take longer to make your own food than to buy it. But take a tip from Baltimore dad Chi Yan, who would make a big batch of pureed fruits or veggies, then freeze single servings in ice cube trays for quick meals for his son, Henry.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | February 7, 2007
Barbara Kempisty of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for biscuits that can be made completely in the microwave. She wanted to be able to prepare the dough in advance and take it to an elderly aunt who is in assisted living and does not have a kitchen but does have access to a microwave. Hope Weiner of Rapid City, S.D., sent in a recipe for whole-wheat microwave biscuits. These biscuits are made with a combination of whole-wheat and white flour. The dough can be made in advance, and the biscuits can be made in the microwave.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| July 29, 2013
Chef and cooking instructor Nikki McGowan spices up traditional shepherd's pie with kid-friendly Mexican seasonings. The pie is simple enough for kids to help cook, too. During the busy school year, McGowan suggests prepping the pie (with the help of the kids) on Sunday, so it's ready to “pop into the oven on a crazy night of homework and after-school activities.” She recommends serving the pie with hot sauce and tortilla chips. “Kids can eat it by scooping it up with the chips,” she says.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better homes and Gardens Magazine | April 24, 1991
Rice that's already cooked can be speedily reheated in the microwave. The next time you have leftover rice, think of this colorful and fast microwave fix up. Stir in a little water with the rice and it will turn out moist and fluffy.Rice needs time to absorb water, whether cooked on the range or in a microwave.Spanish Rice1 large green pepper, coarsely chopped1 large tomato, coarsely chopped1 medium onion, chopped2 tablespoons margarine or butter2 cups cooked rice1/3 cup water1/2 teaspoon salt1/4 teaspoon pepperIn a one-quart microwave-safe casserole combine green pepper, tomato, onion and margarine or butter.
FEATURES
By Kate Holschuh and Kate Holschuh,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 24, 1992
BOULDER, Colo. -- Just when you thought microwavable burritos, popcorn and Bavarian Wiener Suppers were going to end the microwave craze, a New York-based company is making scarves that you can zap.The Phoenix Dynamics Corp. has begun marketing Warm-Upz microwavable scarves and bandannas. In 30 seconds, the garments heat to give off warmth that can last an hour, depending on how cold it is outside.Product distributor Joel Hudesman, calling from his office in Woodmere, N.Y., says the trick is a micro-heating strip of flexible plastic cubes containing a non-toxic liquid that is activated when zapped with microwaves.
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | April 8, 1998
Item: Simply PotatoesServings per package: about 4Cost: $2.59Preparation time: 4 minutes in microwave, 15 minutes to 30 minutes in conventional oven, depending on quantity used.Review: You want mashed potatoes in an instant? This version, in a refrigerated tray, is for you. You'd be hard-pressed to tap an easier source for the many-splendored spud. Tear back the plastic on top, shove the tray into the microwave, nuke it on high for 3 minutes. Then add a touch of margarine and stir, and nuke for another minute.
FEATURES
By Desiree Vivea and Desiree Vivea,Copley News Service | March 25, 1992
Sausages of various types have been tempting our palates for centuries. They were popular at least several hundred years before the birth of Christ, and a cookbook written around A.D. 200 contains a number of sausage recipes.The popularity of sausage has continued into the modern era, and the variety of sausage available today is staggering. To walk into any good deli and inspect their wares is to be introduced to such ethnic fare as Polish kielbasa and Swedish potato sausage, a favorite in my family, especially around the holidays.
FEATURES
By Desiree Vivea and Desiree Vivea,Copley News Service | February 19, 1992
Resting safe below the tumultuous surf, nestled among the starfish and pier pilings, dwell sumptuous bivalves just waiting to be harvested.Starting out in infancy no bigger than a pinpoint, "spats," or baby oysters, grow up to become one of the world's most relished species of shellfish. From French Marenne to Blue Point, Chincoteague to Canadian Golden Mantle, oysters by any other name would taste as sweet.Oysters inspire not only the palate but the mind's fancy. Creole legend has it that errant husbands, sidetracked in their wanderings and tardy in returning home for the evening, could placate irate wives with a gift of oysters.
FEATURES
By Desiree Vivea and Desiree Vivea,Copley News Service | March 25, 1992
Sausages of various types have been tempting our palates for centuries. They were popular at least several hundred years before the birth of Christ, and a cookbook written around A.D. 200 contains a number of sausage recipes.The popularity of sausage has continued into the modern era, and the variety of sausage available today is staggering. To walk into any good deli and inspect their wares is to be introduced to such ethnic fare as Polish kielbasa and Swedish potato sausage, a favorite in my family, especially around the holidays.
NEWS
February 18, 2013
A few decades ago when faster and more compact microwaves were all the rage, a local service organization held a raffle for a beautiful new microwave. Every year the same sparkling microwave was dragged out of its box and put on display, but after year after year of seeing the same machine that no one ever won, it became a local joke. The same could be said of President Obama's State of the Union Address. This year he asked for more money to rebuild 70 failing bridges, but we've heard that line before - trillions of dollars ago, in fact, beginning with his first stimulus request.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
The only thing more shocking than Italian pasta from a microwave is how great it can be. At Daniela's Pasta and Pastries, a tiny, two-table Hampden restaurant, entrees are kept in a glass deli case, and re-heated to order in one of the microwave ovens. What good, you may ask, can come from a nuke job? If the Lasagna alla Bolognese ($6.99) is any indication, this method works quite well. Daniela's lasagna is handmade-on-site, with a rich red meat sauce rendered pink by a bechamel that totes a wisp of nutmeg.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2011
Maryland did some encouraging things Sunday, right? There was James Padgett with his first career double-double. There were Sean Mosley's 17 points. And, of course, there was Terrell "the Microwave" Stoglin and his 31 points. But, let's face it, this is hardly the Notre Dame that ended UCLA's 88-game winning streak so many years ago. Raise your hand if you remember that one. The Irish seem to play a variation of "small ball. " Three guards -- sometimes more -- out there at once.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | January 25, 2011
Sometimes you look at a decades-old photo of yourself at the beach and are struck by the thought that you should have worn more skimpy two-pieces while you had the chance. Sometimes you watch a mystery in a movie theater and realize you just don't enjoy it as much as you would at home, where you can use the remote to go back if you missed a clue. And sometimes you go to heat up your soup in the office microwave and glance at the controls and think, "What is this country coming to?" In my company's newly remodeled kitchenette sit two General Electric microwave ovens (because heaven knows we efficient Americans cannot be expected to wait while someone else flash-cooks his meal in less than two minutes)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
Karen Clark gets to the office by 6 a.m. and eats breakfast at her desk a few hours later, when most of her colleagues are arriving for the day. That's when the comments start. "Eeew, you're eating that for breakfast?!!" Clark enjoys dinner food for breakfast. Her most important meal of the day is usually last night's leftovers. Steak. Spaghetti. Fried fish. If you're thinking that's none of your business, Clark couldn't agree more. She believes her eating habits shouldn't concern her co-workers at a Baltimore financial services firm either.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2008
If I have to look at one more oven, I'm going to ask the salesperson to turn it on so I can stick my head in it and end this misery. I'm pretty sure there was a time in America when consumers had only a mere 100 or so ovens to choose from. This was a nice, simple time when people could discover that their oven had broken, go out shopping the next day to select a new model, and have it delivered promptly the following afternoon. This was also back in the day when brand loyalty existed.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and By Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | December 26, 2001
John M. Risher of Greensburg, Pa., sent in a request that was short, asking for a dish that will surely be sweet. "I would like to know the recipe for making apple butter," he wrote. Betty Mullins of Spring Lake, N.C., responded with a recipe that she says came from the Pillsbury Cookbook. Apple Butter MAKES 4 HALF pint jars 8 cups peeled and cored apples 2 cups apple cider or juice 1 1/2 cups sugar 1 teaspoon lemon juice 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon ground clove 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice In a microwaveable bowl, add apples and cider, loosely cover and microwave for 12 to 15 minutes, or until tender.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 6, 2003
Can I Dissolve Gelatin in the Microwave? Man, are we too busy these days. This reminds me of the comedian who quotes the microwave directions on the back of a box of Pop-Tarts. It actually says to microwave those gourmet delights for three seconds -- yes, three seconds -- because who has time in their warp-speed lives to wait a minute and a half for them to cook in the toaster. So I guess if dissolving gelatin the old-fashioned way just doesn't fit into your hectic schedule, then yes, you can use the microwave to speed up the process.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | December 26, 2007
Two pioneers have heeded Struever Bros.' call to "live green" in Baltimore, and here's what life is like out on Clipper Mill's new housing frontier: No microwave. Paper window blinds. And granite-countertop guilt. There are many upsides, however. Not least: The grandkids get a kick out of the dual-force toilets. Elvon and True Lloyd weren't looking for an adventure in environmentally conscious living when they moved to Baltimore from Arlington, Va. The retirees just wanted a house near their daughter, son-in-law and grandchildren in Rodgers Forge.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | October 24, 2007
If you can bypass the butter, popcorn is a low-fat, whole-grain snack full of fiber. But it can be tough to resist the beast. This Rosemary Cheese Popcorn recipe gussies up fat-free microwave popcorn with an herb and cheese and a single tablespoon of butter to make the popcorn stick. When buying microwave popcorn, watch out for "butter flavoring." Recently the Associated Press reported that a man who had eaten three bags of microwaved popcorn a day for several years was diagnosed with a severe respiratory ailment known as "popcorn lung."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.