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By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 3, 2002
I edited the words in my "custom dictionary," but I can't find the main spell-checker dictionary in Outlook Express or Microsoft Word. How can I edit the spell-checker dictionary? When a user attempts to edit the dictionary in Microsoft Word, the software automatically disables its own automatic spell-checking feature until you turn it back on. To restore the automatic spelling changes in Microsoft Word, click on Tools, then Options and then select the Spelling & Grammar tab. Put a check in the proper box there, and your automatic changes will be restored in Word only.
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NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | January 27, 2010
Last week, reader Bucky contributed this Top 10 list of Food Quotations on Dining@Large (baltimoresun.com/diningat large): Somewhere along the way, I started jotting down quotations that struck me as insightful or funny or potentially useful for staff meeting arguments in a little spiral-bound notebook that I carried around with me in my briefcase. ... I went into my collection of quotations (now stored on Microsoft Word) and dug out some of my favorites that would meet the pesky "food-related" requirement.
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BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,New York Times News Service | September 18, 1995
A NEW KIND of computer virus has descended upon the world. How easy is it to create one? Fifteen minutes after opening a Microsoft Word reference manual, I had cranked out a one-line program that could eliminate crucial system files from a hard drive. After an hour I had adapted the program to run automatically whenever anyone opened a file called HELPFUL.DOC.By bedtime I had figured out how to get this file to transmogrify Word itself so that it would embed my trick program in any document it opened.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | September 27, 2007
When you write a letter, term paper or newspaper column, you'll probably use Microsoft Word. Buffing up a balance sheet? You'll probably use Microsoft Excel. Nodding off during a mind-numbing presentation? You're a victim of Microsoft PowerPoint. These are the building blocks of Microsoft Office, the company's flagship productivity suite and 800-pound gorilla of the business and academic world. Whether you're a Windows or Mac user, you've probably paid the Microsoft Office toll - more than once.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 10, 2004
Much of our office work was saved on discs compatible with the Ami Pro word processor on our old Hewlett-Packard computer and now need to be transferred into our new Windows XP/Office XP system. Is it possible to program my new Dell computer to accept my old AMI Pro discs? Please don't tell me that they all have to be retyped. A $149 upgrade to Corel's new WordPerfect Office 12 is exactly the tool you need. By contrast, as privately held Corel Corp. struggles to get by with about 5 percent of the office software market that Microsoft dominates, WordPerfect has been tweaked to handle the formats used by just about all of the past victims of Bill Gates' software giant.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | November 1, 1993
There is no such thing as the final word in word processing software. The three leading programs for Windows computers -- Microsoft Word, Wordperfect and Ami Pro -- regularly leapfrog one another with new and better features.This month, after two years of development, both Microsoft Word and Wordperfect hopped up with new versions.It is always difficult to choose a winner in word processing software, simply because all three of the leading programs are so good. In this latest round, the good get better.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | April 12, 1999
Here's the good news: Melissa the Virus had her 15 minutes of fame. The cops say they've arrested her creator, and they say he'll probably go to jail.Here's the bad news: When they tracked the suspect down, investigators exploited a feature (or flaw) in Microsoft Word that exposes everyone who uses the program to potentially embarrassing invasions of privacy.The secret is that Word not only tracks the creator of every document, but also records every change you or anyone else has made. You can't see the information on your screen, but it's there -- hidden in what Microsoft calls "metadata," stored on your disk and transmitted with the file when you e-mail it to someone or post it on the Web.Now there are good reasons for tracking revisions and additions to a document, particularly in a collaborative environment.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | March 9, 1997
I SPEND a lot of time recounting tales of woe from friends and readers, but this one is my own.Naturally, it happened at the worst possible time. With a business trip scheduled the next day, I was trying to finish off a dozen little jobs, including a presentation for the conference I was attending. This involved copying a lot of files between two different desktop computers and a laptop machine.I copied a couple of Microsoft Word files from a new computer running Windows 95 and opened them using my regular desktop machine, which was running Windows 3.1.I knew something was wrong when it took a long time for the file to open.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 12, 1998
I use Microsoft Word all day, and speed counts. I bought a new Dell 333 MHz Pentium II, which I assumed would operate faster than my old 150 MHz Pentium. However, when I click on the "close" button of the document window, it takes about 20 seconds for the screen to clear. With my old computer, the screen cleared almost instantaneously. Now 20 seconds may not seem like a big deal, but I work with dozens of documents every day, so a 20-second wait every time I exit means that I'm twiddling my thumbs for upward of 15 minutes every day. What '' can I do to make it close documents more quickly?
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | January 27, 2010
Last week, reader Bucky contributed this Top 10 list of Food Quotations on Dining@Large (baltimoresun.com/diningat large): Somewhere along the way, I started jotting down quotations that struck me as insightful or funny or potentially useful for staff meeting arguments in a little spiral-bound notebook that I carried around with me in my briefcase. ... I went into my collection of quotations (now stored on Microsoft Word) and dug out some of my favorites that would meet the pesky "food-related" requirement.
BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | February 22, 2007
I use Microsoft Office at work, and when I start to compose a new document, the text alignment defaults to the center position. I can use the alignment icon to align the text to the left, but I have to do that every time I start a new document. How can I permanently restore the alignment to the left? - Kathy Terzian If I ran Microsoft Corp., I would force the programmers who create and maintain Microsoft Word to put a red button labeled "Repair Tip" at the top of the screen. When a user clicks on that fat red icon, he or she would get something like this: "Microsoft Word often gets messed up because users do something wrong while creating a document and then mistakenly save those bad changes in the master template for Word, which is a Word document called normal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 10, 2004
Much of our office work was saved on discs compatible with the Ami Pro word processor on our old Hewlett-Packard computer and now need to be transferred into our new Windows XP/Office XP system. Is it possible to program my new Dell computer to accept my old AMI Pro discs? Please don't tell me that they all have to be retyped. A $149 upgrade to Corel's new WordPerfect Office 12 is exactly the tool you need. By contrast, as privately held Corel Corp. struggles to get by with about 5 percent of the office software market that Microsoft dominates, WordPerfect has been tweaked to handle the formats used by just about all of the past victims of Bill Gates' software giant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 3, 2002
I edited the words in my "custom dictionary," but I can't find the main spell-checker dictionary in Outlook Express or Microsoft Word. How can I edit the spell-checker dictionary? When a user attempts to edit the dictionary in Microsoft Word, the software automatically disables its own automatic spell-checking feature until you turn it back on. To restore the automatic spelling changes in Microsoft Word, click on Tools, then Options and then select the Spelling & Grammar tab. Put a check in the proper box there, and your automatic changes will be restored in Word only.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | April 12, 1999
Can you help with a problem with Word 97? When I first installed the program in January it did everything I asked it to do, including applying headers and footers. I don't think I have changed anything since then, but maybe I did so accidentally.The problem is that I can no longer get headers and footers. The help function and the book say to click the view menu, then click "headers and footers" and go from there. That's what I used to do and it worked.But now, when I click the view menu, there is no "headers and footers."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | April 12, 1999
Here's the good news: Melissa the Virus had her 15 minutes of fame. The cops say they've arrested her creator, and they say he'll probably go to jail.Here's the bad news: When they tracked the suspect down, investigators exploited a feature (or flaw) in Microsoft Word that exposes everyone who uses the program to potentially embarrassing invasions of privacy.The secret is that Word not only tracks the creator of every document, but also records every change you or anyone else has made. You can't see the information on your screen, but it's there -- hidden in what Microsoft calls "metadata," stored on your disk and transmitted with the file when you e-mail it to someone or post it on the Web.Now there are good reasons for tracking revisions and additions to a document, particularly in a collaborative environment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | February 1, 1999
My computer will suddenly freeze up when I am running a program (no set length of time) and it takes Control + Alt + Delete several times to unfreeze it. Sometimes it has to be cut off and turned back on again. I must offer the pathetic answer that such annoying breakdowns are commonplace and usually beyond repair. The insane dance known as Control-Alt-Delete will be required on many days (maybe on most days) by perhaps 50 million people like yourself who have laid down many hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars on the promise of experiencing the information revolution.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | February 1, 1999
My computer will suddenly freeze up when I am running a program (no set length of time) and it takes Control + Alt + Delete several times to unfreeze it. Sometimes it has to be cut off and turned back on again. I must offer the pathetic answer that such annoying breakdowns are commonplace and usually beyond repair. The insane dance known as Control-Alt-Delete will be required on many days (maybe on most days) by perhaps 50 million people like yourself who have laid down many hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars on the promise of experiencing the information revolution.
BUSINESS
By Jim Coates and Jim Coates,Chicago Tribune | February 22, 2007
I use Microsoft Office at work, and when I start to compose a new document, the text alignment defaults to the center position. I can use the alignment icon to align the text to the left, but I have to do that every time I start a new document. How can I permanently restore the alignment to the left? - Kathy Terzian If I ran Microsoft Corp., I would force the programmers who create and maintain Microsoft Word to put a red button labeled "Repair Tip" at the top of the screen. When a user clicks on that fat red icon, he or she would get something like this: "Microsoft Word often gets messed up because users do something wrong while creating a document and then mistakenly save those bad changes in the master template for Word, which is a Word document called normal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 12, 1998
I use Microsoft Word all day, and speed counts. I bought a new Dell 333 MHz Pentium II, which I assumed would operate faster than my old 150 MHz Pentium. However, when I click on the "close" button of the document window, it takes about 20 seconds for the screen to clear. With my old computer, the screen cleared almost instantaneously. Now 20 seconds may not seem like a big deal, but I work with dozens of documents every day, so a 20-second wait every time I exit means that I'm twiddling my thumbs for upward of 15 minutes every day. What '' can I do to make it close documents more quickly?
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