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By Craig Crossman and Craig Crossman,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 11, 1992
Why would you fax a blank sheet of paper to your computer? Because it activates PaperWorks, a new and novel program from Xerox Corp. that allows you to control your computer from a standard fax.PaperWorks allows you to retrieve, distribute, file and organize documents stored in your computer simply by faxing it sheets of paper. The computer must be running Microsoft Windows and must be equipped with a fax modem.Ordinary modems allow computers to send information to other computers via ordinary telephone lines.
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BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | May 24, 2007
One thing I've learned over the years is not to give up when some new gadget or technology doesn't work the first time. Heck, I've been tinkering with videoconferencing for more than a decade, waiting for something resembling a telephone conversation with a moving picture of a person who actually sounded like he was talking to me. A few weeks ago, I tried a new Microsoft LifeCam using the company's own video chat software, as well as the popular Skype...
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BUSINESS
By PETER McWILLIAMS and PETER McWILLIAMS,1991 Universal Press Syndicate | January 16, 1991
Most people blame themselves for not being "technological," or, in the case of computers, "computer literate." Something else was at work, here, however: design.When I bought my first MS-DOS computer some years ago, I was astounded at how complicated DOS was. I found DOS needlessly complex for setting up subdirectories, moving to subdirectories and loading one's program. Why couldn't there be a way to turn on your computer, get a list of your programs and choose the one you wanted to use at the push of a key?
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ and MIKE HIMOWITZ,SUN COLUMNIOST | April 6, 2006
Great news! We can finally buy a PC that runs the Macintosh operating system. Or is it a Mac that runs Microsoft Windows? It all depends on your point of view, now that Apple has given its blessing - and a little bit of help - to users who want to run Windows on the latest generation of Macintosh computers. Those machines use Intel's Core Duo processors, which are in the same family of chips that run Windows-based PCs. Theoretically, these IntelliMacs (or MacIntels) are quite capable of running Windows.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Evening Sun Staff | October 14, 1991
I write so frequently about Microsoft Windows that I often forget about people like my friend Sam.Four or five years ago, Sam bought an IBM XT-compatible machine that he uses mainly for word processing. It's hopelessly out of date by today's standards, but Sam doesn't know that. It still does what he hired it to do -- churn out stories, letters and the kids' term papers -- and he's happy with it.A few days ago Sam stopped by the desk and asked, "What's this Windows business you write about all the time?
BUSINESS
By PETER H LEWIS | March 22, 1993
Central Point Software, late but great, has introduced a version of its popular PC Tools utilities for computers that use Microsoft Windows.PC Tools for Windows does all the expected housekeeping chores, including tidying up the hard disk, straightening out the file cabinets and disinfecting the files of viruses. But it also makes Windows a bit easier, a bit faster and a lot more convenient to use.It does all this -- plus file compression, backup, hardware system analysis, file recovery and other tricks -- with little effort required from the user.
BUSINESS
By Lawrence J. Magid and Lawrence J. Magid,1991 Los Angeles Times Syndicate, Times Mirror Square, Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 | May 6, 1991
IBM, AT&T and Toshiba have recently introduced high-end notebook PCs that deliver desktop computing power on the go. All three are easy to carry, but at $5,000 and up, they're heavy on the budget.All are equipped with the Intel 386SX central processing unit (CPU) -- a slightly slower version of Intel's mainstream 386 CPU. They can run virtually any IBM-compatible software including Microsoft Windows, OS/2 and the most demanding desktop publishing, graphic and computer-aided design programs.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | November 9, 1992
A few years ago, if you'd asked me whether it was a good idea to to buy an IBM computer, I would have asked you which lottery you'd just won.While IBM has always made fine computers, they were designed and priced for corporate buyers -- people who were spending other people's money. The premium for the IBM logo was anywhere between $500 and $3,000, depending on the horsepower under the hood.But corporate buyers have wised up, and after years of losing market share to clone makers who produced good computers and sold them much cheaper, so has IBM.The company's new PS/1 and PS/Value Point lines offer a variety of attractive machines at prices that are finally within easy reach of the average home and small business user.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | April 3, 1995
"Help! My mouse is dying."The plaintive voice on the phone reminded me of a 6-year-old whose pet was about to give up the ghost.But it was a friend who was having trouble with the little pointing device that makes user-friendly PCs so friendly. He had discovered what may be the weakest link in today's computer systems.I've never had a mouse that didn't give me trouble somewhere down the line. This can be a real problem, because when your mouse dies, you're plumb out of luck if you're working on a Macintosh or an IBM PC running Microsoft Windows.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder Financial Service | July 29, 1991
Here are summaries of some recent Computing product reviews. Each product is rated on a scale of one to four, with one computer indicating poor and four indicating excellent:WordPerfect 2.0, for Apple Macintosh Plus or better with hard disk drive. $495. From WordPerfect Corp., 1555 N. Technology Way, Orem, Utah 84057. (800) 321-4566.WordPerfect 2.0 for the Macintosh is a big improvement over Version 1.0 and a real challenger to Word and MacWrite. It has an extensive list of abilities from text styles such as strikeout and redline to powerful macros, spelling checker and thesaurus, indexing and keyboard configuring, kerning and columns for desktop publishing, and even a complete graphics program.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2001
When federal prosecutors failed to disrupt the launch of its biggest new software in years, Microsoft Corp. breathed a sigh of relief that it had dodged a bullet. Then something bigger hit. The Sept. 11 attack on the United States thrust the nation into war - and made it an inopportune time to launch a $250 million campaign to promote Microsoft's new Windows XP software. That's 25 times as much as the company spent to introduce the original Windows 3.0 software 11 years ago. Microsoft even changed the original tagline of its ad from "Prepare to fly" to "Yes you can" because references to flying took on a mixed message six weeks ago. Wall Street and industry analysts have retreated from earlier expectations that the new XP software will prod many personal computers sales this holiday season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 2, 2001
I cannot find the folder for Accessories when I click on Start in Windows. So I cannot use Calculator, System Tools, Backup and other features of Windows. I have tried Hewlett-Packard and Microsoft technical support repeatedly to no avail. Microsoft Windows 95/98/ME/2000 all use a master folder called Programs to hold all of the programs that get made available when a user clicks on the Start button at the lower left of the screen of the Windows desktop. In your case, Accessories has flown the coop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | April 30, 2001
When I was writing headlines for my college newspaper back in the age of metal type, I frequently ran into a sticky problem. Our small-town printer had a limited selection of typefaces, and he set our headlines by hand, character-by-character, using metal slugs stored in dusty wooden cases. Over the years, some of the letters were lost or broken, but they were horrendously expensive to replace. Since business wasn't booming and we couldn't afford to pay him much in the first place, our printer figured we could make do with what he had. This wasn't a problem with Qs or Zs, but by the time my generation produced the paper, there were only three capital Rs left in our favorite headline font.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | March 5, 2001
I've been sending e-mail with my customized signature (name, address and my home page address) on it for a long time. But when I click on a new message in Outlook Express, I get the following message: "Warning: The signature file specified is not a valid text-file. The signature feature has been disabled." The signature is gone. I can't find anything in any of the help files on my computer, and I can't figure out how to put it back except to type it in manually each time. Any hints on how to get it back?
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Mark Ribbing and Michael Stroh and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1999
Will Microsoft Windows go the way of the abacus?On Friday, U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson issued the first part of his decision in the government's antitrust case against Microsoft, finding that the software giant has a monopoly in the operating systems that act as the brains of computers worldwide.But even as the court mulls what should be done about Microsoft and its popular operating system, companies are tapping the Internet to create technologies that might someday make Windows -- and possibly the personal computer -- a high-tech has-been.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | January 11, 1999
Your PC is a remarkable music machine. In fact, even the least expensive computer today has capabilities that would have made a professional musician green with envy a few years ago.This magic is embeded in your sound card and in software - much of it bundled with Microsoft Windows - that can turn your computer into a jukebox, or even a full orchestra.The World Wide Web is teeming with music that can take advantage of your computer's internal music maker. Last week we talked about Internet radio stations; this time around, we'll discuss collections of MIDI files - electronic compositions waiting for your computer to play them.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1998
Want to take your movies on the road?You can do it with the new Panasonic Palm Theater, the first portable DVD player with a built-in LCD monitor. The $1,400 gadget can also double as regular DVD player that hooks up to your home theater system and play movies through your TV.DVD is a new medium for digital information that can pack seven to eight times as much data onto a compact disk as today's standard technology. That data can be information, music, or full-screen video with multiple language channels.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | January 25, 1993
Just as audio compact disks have banished vinyl phonograph albums to the nostalgia bins, compact disks for computers may soon reduce the role of the familiar floppy disk.After several years of slow growth, the use of compact-disk drives in personal computers is beginning to accelerate.Computer market researchers say there are about 2.5 million CD-ROM drives in use. More than 750,000 drives have been sold in the last six months, and the researchers say there may be 8 million to 10 million CD-ROM drives in use by 1995.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | December 21, 1998
Do you know of any company selling software to record a daily diary type of input? Any of the diary functions I have found are really calendar functions and not a true diary or journal keeper.A little-known feature of Microsoft Windows is a diary function written into the Windows Notepad software designed to allow one to create simple text files on the fly.Open Notepad and type .LOG (uppercase is required) at the beginning of the text field. Then name the file and save it where you can find it easily at the end of each day. I call my current diary file DECLOG.
NEWS
October 31, 1998
Microsoft's big byte out of hot competition in computer 0) marketThe price of computers has fallen significantly in the past few years, from more than $2,000 to under $1,000 for an entry-level computer. This is because of fierce competion in the computer ** industry for nearly every major component of the modern computer.But one component of the computer that has not dropped in price is the operating system software.Seven years ago, the combination of Microsoft DOS and Microsoft Windows 3.1 added about $90-$100 to the price of the standard PC.When Windows 95 came out, it still cost about $90-$100, and the recent advent of Windows 98 has seen no reduction in price.
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