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By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 8, 1997
NEW YORK -- Who needs Warren Buffett when you can go to Jeff Klubek and Tim Getty?The two beat the renowned billionaire investor returns by a wide margin, delivering 37 percent and 58 percent returns on their stock portfolios in two 10-week periods since October. The names of these money managers don't ring a bell? They shouldn't.Klubek and Getty are only 12 years old.The two boys, armed with a hypothetical kitty of $100,000, made their killing with bets on Intel Corp., Microsoft Corp., other computer companies and one airline, winning a stock-picking competition among 650,000 New York elementary, middle and high school students.
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BUSINESS
By Alana Semuels and Alana Semuels,Los Angeles Times | February 14, 2009
Despite being mocked in Apple ads and losing market share to its Cupertino, Calif., competitor, Microsoft isn't giving up the fight. Late Thursday, Microsoft announced that it had hired a former Wal-Mart manager, David Porter, to open a chain of branded Microsoft stores. Porter, who is set to start work Tuesday, is charged with improving the PC-buying experience. The company said his first task will be to set the timing, locations and design of Microsoft-branded retail stores, which will sell computers installed with Microsoft software as well as other company products.
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BUSINESS
By Alana Semuels and Alana Semuels,Los Angeles Times | February 14, 2009
Despite being mocked in Apple ads and losing market share to its Cupertino, Calif., competitor, Microsoft isn't giving up the fight. Late Thursday, Microsoft announced that it had hired a former Wal-Mart manager, David Porter, to open a chain of branded Microsoft stores. Porter, who is set to start work Tuesday, is charged with improving the PC-buying experience. The company said his first task will be to set the timing, locations and design of Microsoft-branded retail stores, which will sell computers installed with Microsoft software as well as other company products.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | February 16, 2005
SAN FRANCISCO - Microsoft Corp. plans to introduce anti-virus software and distribute free anti-spyware programs by the end of this year in its latest attempt to improve widely criticized security problems with its software. The world's biggest software company also plans to build new anti-fraud tools into the next version of its popular Internet Explorer Web browser, Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates said yesterday at a computer security conference. Gates said Internet Explorer 7 is scheduled for release this summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | July 26, 1999
Students and teachers across Maryland will gain access to hundreds of dollars worth of Microsoft software for the price of a single textbook, thanks to an agreement between the software giant and a consortium of Maryland schools.Under the three-year contract, schools will pay $42 for a suite of Microsoft's most popular word processing, spreadsheet, database, and development software -- programs normally sold to educators for $150 each and to the general public for $500 or more.Microsoft has forged similar deals in other states, but this is the first to include such a diverse collection of institutions, officials said.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | June 9, 1993
Microsoft Corp., the software giant, is trying to extend its powerful reach beyond the computer to the rest of office machinery -- the copier, the printer, the fax, even the phone.For more than a year, William H. Gates, 37, the company's chairman, has circled the globe, signing up equipment makers to become part of his vision of an office in which machines can pass work from one to another seamlessly, thanks to Microsoft software.Since Microsoft succeeded in setting the dominant standard in personal computer operating software, Mr. Gates gets a hearing when he presents a vision of another standard in software architecture.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2001
A federal judge in Baltimore questioned Microsoft Corp. yesterday on the proposed settlement of more than 100 private class action lawsuits, and the software giant detailed amendments that it said were aimed at ensuring the agreement's impartiality. Under the proposed settlement, Microsoft would subsidize refurbished computers, pay for new computers, and provide software and training to more than 12,500 schools over five years. Critics have said the proposed settlement is anti-competitive and allows Mi- crosoft to break into one of the few software markets it does not already dominate: schools.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2002
A federal judge in Baltimore rejected yesterday Microsoft's plan to settle class-action lawsuits by giving needy public schools $1 billion worth of free computers and software. The decision by Chief U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz handed the software giant another blow in a series of courtroom defeats as it tries to overcome accusations that it has used its monopoly power to overcharge customers. Motz concluded that the proposed settlement would heavily favor the introduction of Microsoft software in schools eligible for the donations, dealing a competitive blow to rivals such as Apple Computer Inc., which controls about a third of the education market.
NEWS
By Charles R. Morris | May 24, 1998
By some alchemy of bad behavior and bad public relations, Bill Gates has contrived to give Microsoft Corp. the same public image as the folks who pollute waterways and sell tobacco.State attorneys general are politicos, usually governor wannabes, not the type to spend a lot of time worrying about national technology policy. The very fact that 20 state attorneys general would join the U.S. Justice Department in filing antitrust suits against Microsoft means they've found a company their constituents love to hate.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 18, 1994
Next year, when you think of Chicago, you may not be thinking about Pizzeria Uno's deep-dish pizza, Mrs. O'Leary's destructive cow or Wrigley's bumbling Cubs.By that point, the Microsoft Corp. may have succeeded in persuading you that Chicago, the code name for the coming new version of Windows, is something you can't live without.Just last month, Microsoft kicked off a massive testing cycle aimed at hammering out the bugs, adding additional features here and there and making critical compatibility tweaks, all with the hope that it might deliver a finished product to customers before the end of the year.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2002
A federal judge in Baltimore rejected yesterday Microsoft's plan to settle class-action lawsuits by giving needy public schools $1 billion worth of free computers and software. The decision by Chief U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz handed the software giant another blow in a series of courtroom defeats as it tries to overcome accusations that it has used its monopoly power to overcharge customers. Motz concluded that the proposed settlement would heavily favor the introduction of Microsoft software in schools eligible for the donations, dealing a competitive blow to rivals such as Apple Computer Inc., which controls about a third of the education market.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2001
A federal judge in Baltimore questioned Microsoft Corp. yesterday on the proposed settlement of more than 100 private class action lawsuits, and the software giant detailed amendments that it said were aimed at ensuring the agreement's impartiality. Under the proposed settlement, Microsoft would subsidize refurbished computers, pay for new computers, and provide software and training to more than 12,500 schools over five years. Critics have said the proposed settlement is anti-competitive and allows Mi- crosoft to break into one of the few software markets it does not already dominate: schools.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 18, 2001
A federal appeals court denied yesterday Microsoft Corp.'s request to delay court proceedings in the government's antitrust case against it, thereby clearing the way for a U.S. District Court to decide what penalties the software maker should face for federal antitrust violations. Microsoft sought the stay in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit this month and, at the same time, petitioned the Supreme Court to hear its case. The company had hoped to halt all court proceedings in the case until the Supreme Court, which is in recess until October, decides whether to take it up. In yesterday's ruling, the appeals court wrote that "Microsoft has failed to demonstrate any substantial harm that would result from the reactivation of the proceedings in the district court."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 1, 1999
NEW YORK -- Sun Microsystems Inc., the fourth-largest seller of servers for the Internet, expects to increase sales by providing office-applications software for desktop users, said Chief Executive Officer Scott McNealy.Yesterday, Sun introduced StarOffice -- free application software for word processing, spreadsheets and graphics that's compatible with Microsoft Corp.'s Office software, which sells for as much as $800. Microsoft is the world's biggest software company."We're taking an old page out of the book and kind of doing a new chapter," McNealy said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | July 26, 1999
Students and teachers across Maryland will gain access to hundreds of dollars worth of Microsoft software for the price of a single textbook, thanks to an agreement between the software giant and a consortium of Maryland schools.Under the three-year contract, schools will pay $42 for a suite of Microsoft's most popular word processing, spreadsheet, database, and development software -- programs normally sold to educators for $150 each and to the general public for $500 or more.Microsoft has forged similar deals in other states, but this is the first to include such a diverse collection of institutions, officials said.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | November 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Testimony from two senior Intel Corp. executives differed sharply yesterday at the Microsoft antitrust trial on whether the software giant had misused its monopoly power to shut down Intel's own software venture.Under cross-examination, Intel Corp. Vice President Steven McGeady said, "We had a fear that if we revealed our [software] program too early to them, Microsoft would bad-mouth the project to [computer makers]. The fear we had was ultimately realized when they stomped it out of existence."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 1, 1999
NEW YORK -- Sun Microsystems Inc., the fourth-largest seller of servers for the Internet, expects to increase sales by providing office-applications software for desktop users, said Chief Executive Officer Scott McNealy.Yesterday, Sun introduced StarOffice -- free application software for word processing, spreadsheets and graphics that's compatible with Microsoft Corp.'s Office software, which sells for as much as $800. Microsoft is the world's biggest software company."We're taking an old page out of the book and kind of doing a new chapter," McNealy said.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | February 16, 2005
SAN FRANCISCO - Microsoft Corp. plans to introduce anti-virus software and distribute free anti-spyware programs by the end of this year in its latest attempt to improve widely criticized security problems with its software. The world's biggest software company also plans to build new anti-fraud tools into the next version of its popular Internet Explorer Web browser, Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates said yesterday at a computer security conference. Gates said Internet Explorer 7 is scheduled for release this summer.
NEWS
By Charles R. Morris | May 24, 1998
By some alchemy of bad behavior and bad public relations, Bill Gates has contrived to give Microsoft Corp. the same public image as the folks who pollute waterways and sell tobacco.State attorneys general are politicos, usually governor wannabes, not the type to spend a lot of time worrying about national technology policy. The very fact that 20 state attorneys general would join the U.S. Justice Department in filing antitrust suits against Microsoft means they've found a company their constituents love to hate.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 23, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Microsoft Corp. lost its bid for a seven-month delay to respond to sweeping antitrust suits as a federal judge yesterday put the case on a faster track, setting Sept. 8 as the start of a full-scale trial.U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson expressed concern that putting the case off until the end of the year -- beyond the Christmas buying rush -- could give the software giant an unfair advantage by letting it sell millions of copies of its new Windows 98 personal computer operating system.
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