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BUSINESS
By Dow Jones News Service | June 23, 1993
MicroProse Inc. said yesterday that it closed its $10 million financing with Spectrum HoloByte Inc.As part of the financing agreement, MicroProse also said that Spectrum has appointed Patrick S. Feely, Gilman G. Louie, Barry James Folsom and Frank Murnane to the MicroProse board, representing one-half of its members.John W. Stealey Sr., MicroProse's co-founder and principal stockholder, has resigned as president and chief executive, and Spectrum intends to appoint a replacement acceptable to MicroProse.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
Deb Tillett has been around the world, pursuing a career in technology that started a few decades ago in the suburbs of Baltimore. She learned the ropes of the video game world while working at one of the local companies - MicroProse - that gave birth to an industry that's now thriving in Hunt Valley and other parts of Baltimore County and Maryland. Earlier this year, she took over the helm at the Emerging Technology Center, Baltimore's main technology business incubator, after that organization's longtime head, Ann Lansinger, retired.
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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | December 24, 1992
MicroProse Inc. said it will post lower-than-expected third-quarter earnings of between 12 cents and 18 cents a share because of a delay in shipping new products until the end of the quarter.Analysts had been expecting earnings of about 46 cents a share, according to Zack's Investment Research.MicroProse, an entertainment software publisher based in Hunt Valley, said sales would still be higher than a year ago, but they will be lower than earlier predictions.In the 1991 quarter, Microprose's net income was $2.3 million, or 34 cents a share, on revenue of $13.1 million.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
A veteran video game industry executive in Maryland who has run her own international consulting business will become the new leader of Baltimore's main technology incubator next month. Deborah Tillett, who worked for Hunt Valley's BreakAway Ltd. and Microprose, among other technology companies, has been picked to run the city's Emerging Technology Center, she confirmed Tuesday by phone. The ETC is a technology startup incubator that has helped launch Baltimore companies since the late 1990s.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | March 19, 1993
John W. "Wild Bill" Stealey wishes he hadn't taken his hands off the joystick at MicroProse Inc. last year.In interviews yesterday, Mr. Stealey, chairman and co-founder of the Hunt Valley-based computer game company, took "full responsibility" for the company's cash crunch, poor earnings and recent management turmoil.Mr. Stealey returned to the controls last month after the departure of its president and replacement of its chief financial officer. MicroProse has suffered painful drops in its earnings and stock price recently.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | February 11, 1993
MicroProse Inc. said yesterday that the recent resignations of two top executives, though coming on the heels of a disappointing earnings report, were not a sign of larger problems at the company.An official at the Hunt Valley-based maker of flight simulation and other video games said yesterday that although the two resignations, both in the past week, were "just a coincidence," MicroProse would use the opportunity to improve its management and the timeliness of its new-game deliveries.Company Vice President Jerry Blair acknowledged yesterday that "the timing of the announcements did not look good" and were liable to lead to speculation that the departures might be a result of Chairman and founder John W. "Wild Bill" Stealey's unhappiness with the company's poor financial performance.
BUSINESS
By Dow Jones News Service | June 23, 1993
MicroProse Inc. said yesterday that it closed its $10 million financing with Spectrum HoloByte Inc.As part of the financing agreement, MicroProse also said that Spectrum has appointed Patrick S. Feely, Gilman G. Louie, Barry James Folsom and Frank Murnane to the MicroProse board, representing one-half of its members.John W. Stealey Sr., MicroProse's co-founder and principal stockholder, has resigned as president and chief executive, and Spectrum intends to appoint a replacement acceptable to MicroProse.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | June 18, 1993
A week after an earlier takeover proposal fell through, MicroProse Inc. reached another tentative buyout agreement yesterday. This time, unlike the previous offer, investors greeted the offer with enthusiasm and said there was a good chance it would succeed.The Hunt Valley-based maker of computer games said it accepted a proposal to merge with Spectrum HoloByte Inc., a small Alameda, Calif.-based game maker with big corporate backers. If the merger is completed, MicroProse's headquarters will move to California, and the company's co-founder, John W. "Wild Bill" Stealey, will be replaced as president and chief executive, MicroProse said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | November 18, 1993
MicroProse Inc., the Hunt Valley designer and marketer of video game software, reported its fourth straight money-losing quarter yesterday as it posted a loss of $12.7 million and a 30 percent decline in revenues.The loss, amounting to $1.91 per share, was MicroProse's deepest immersion in red ink to date, but a company spokesman said the loss was in line with expectations and would have no effect on its plans to merge next month with Spectrum HoloByte of Alameda, Calif.The negative second-quarter results compared with earnings of $1.2 million, or 18 cents a share, in the same period a year ago. Sales for the quarter were $9.5 million, down from about $13.6 million in the year-ago quarter.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | August 12, 1995
Spectrum HoloByte Inc., the Alameda, Calif.-based parent company of MicroProse Inc., launched the second phase of a restructuring that is designed to reduce the staff of the computer game company by 15 percent.The move was announced Thursday and apparently executed by yesterday, but the parent company was not willing to discuss the impact on the Hunt Valley operations of MicroProse, which Spectrum bought in 1993."We won't tell you what it was [in Hunt Valley] because we haven't disclosed that to anyone," said Richard Gelhaus, Spectrum's chief financial officer.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2010
When Sid Meier and a partner launched the video game design firm MicroProse in the early 1980s, the industry was still in its infancy. Today, Meier is widely regarded as the "godfather" of computer gaming. Based in Hunt Valley, MicroProse grew over the years to become a beacon to computer geeks who wanted to be part of the growing market of video games on personal computers. More than two decades later, Meier, 56, is still designing video games — his most famous is Civilization, a virtual empire-building game — for another company he helped found, Firaxis Games, in Hunt Valley.
BUSINESS
By STACEY HIRSH and STACEY HIRSH,SUN REPORTER | July 30, 2006
For most executives, having an Xbox 360 and an armload of video games in their office would be an admission that they have way too much time on their hands. But for some Hunt Valley corporate-types, it's practically required. Just ask Dave Inscore, a founder of video game company Big Huge Games. He often uses the Xbox 360 in his office to check out the competition. "Right now I'm actually playing a couple of games - I'm playing one on Xbox and another game on PC - that I need to play for the sake of making the correct decisions for my job," Inscore said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1999
Hunt Valley game maker Sid Meier will be inducted into the Academy of Interactive Arts and Sciences Hall of Fame, officials announced last week.Meier,45, is a legend in the computer game industry. In the early 1980s he pioneered flight simulations and strategy games at Microprose, which he co-founded in 1982 with "Wild Bill" Stealey. One of his best-known efforts, Civilization, was voted the best computer game of all time. His latest game, Alpha Centauri, is already being called a classic.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1997
To most white-collar workers, watching the company you work for go into conniptions and end up being sold can look like a recipe for doom. But if you make computer games -- Doom, after all, is the name of the third best-selling game ever -- it may not be such a bad thing.At least, that's how it seems to be working out for Sid Meier and Jeff Briggs.Four years after the Hunt Valley-based game company MicroProse Inc. culminated a series of big losses and painful restructurings by finding a merger partner, Meier and Briggs are on their own. Last week, their year-old company, Firaxis Software Inc. unveiled its first product, Sid Meier's Gettysburg, a simulation of the battle that is the first of two games Firaxis is developing under a deal with games giant Electronic Arts Inc.Electronic Arts is counting on the pair to help a company best known for youth-oriented console games build itself in the more adult-oriented market for personal computer-based games.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | August 12, 1995
Spectrum HoloByte Inc., the Alameda, Calif.-based parent company of MicroProse Inc., launched the second phase of a restructuring that is designed to reduce the staff of the computer game company by 15 percent.The move was announced Thursday and apparently executed by yesterday, but the parent company was not willing to discuss the impact on the Hunt Valley operations of MicroProse, which Spectrum bought in 1993."We won't tell you what it was [in Hunt Valley] because we haven't disclosed that to anyone," said Richard Gelhaus, Spectrum's chief financial officer.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1995
Spectrum Holobyte Inc., which has been swamped with red ink since buying Hunt Valley-based MicroProse Inc. in 1993, cut its work force by more than 60 workers, or 15 percent, company officials said yesterday.The Alameda, Calif.-based computer game maker said it cut its staff to below 400 workers and slashed the number of games it plans to produce this year from 50 to 29 in an effort to reduce its costs and improve its chances of turning a profit this year.Richard Gelhaus, the company's senior vice president for finance, said every Spectrum office and division was affected by the layoffs.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | June 12, 1993
MicroProse Inc. has announced the cancellation of a proposed agreement in which investors would have received control of the Hunt Valley-based computer game maker in exchange for much-needed cash.The company said Tuesday that it had tentatively agreed to a deal in which investors would have pumped in no more than $13 million for at least 4 million shares of MicroProse's common stock, the right to bring in a new chief executive and the receipt of a majority of seats on the board of directors.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | August 19, 1993
MicroProse Inc., a Hunt Valley computer and video game maker, said yesterday that it expects to report a loss of $8.3 million for its latest quarter, almost half of it because of a costly restructuring that includes the layoff of an additional 30 percent of its work force.The company said it expects a loss of $1.24 a share in its first fiscal quarter, which ended June 30, compared with a loss of $1.3 million, or 19 cents a share, in the same period a year ago.The results follow a loss of $4.9 million, or 74 cents a share, in the fourth fiscal quarter, which ended March 31. For the full year, the company lost $5.2 million, or 78 cents a share.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1995
Spectrum HoloByte Inc.Alameda, Calif* ... ... ... ... Ticker ... ... Yesterday's... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Symbol ... ... Cls. ... ... Chg.... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... SBYT ... .. .. 14 1/4 .. .. .. + 1/4Period ended3/31 ... ... ... ... 4th qtr. ... ... ... Year ago ... ... Chg.Revenue ... .. .. .. $13,150 ... .. .. .. $16,774 .. .. .. -21.6%Net Income ... .. .. $(13,970) ... ... .. $(5,645) ... ... --Primary EPS .. .. .. $(0.68) ... .. .. .. $(0.33) .. .. .. --... ... ... .. .. .. 12 mos. ... ... ... Year ago ... ... Chg.Revenue ... .. .. .. $84,350 ... ... ... $68,216 .. .. .. +23.7%Net Income ... .. .. $(18,051)
FEATURES
By Suzanna Stephens and Suzanna Stephens,Contributing Writer | April 28, 1995
Step back, amateur game-players, here come the professionals.They are the test-team members of the Quality Assurance department of MicroProse Software in Hunt Valley. These 27 men and women spend their days playing video games on company time. But they don't merely play, their expertise lies in "breaking" the games -- outsmarting the computer programs they're playing against.Their work has contributed to the development of some of the industry's most popular games: "Sid Meier's Colonization," "X-Com" and "X-Com II: Terror from the Deep," "Transfer Tycoon" and "Pacific Air War Gold" to name just a few.Although the testers' main objective is to find bugs that, once activated, cause the game program to crash, other responsibilities range from critiquing the story line and verifying historical accuracy to approving of color schemes and graphics.
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