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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | October 31, 1996
MONTEREY, Calif. -- Apple Computer Inc. said yesterday that it will introduce a Macintosh operating system in 1998 that will be able to run on any microprocessor.Chairman Gilbert Amelio, in a speech to analysts and investors, said the new operating system will run some older applications, but will have a new core of software code that enables it to run on chips from Intel Corp., Sun Microsystems Inc. and others -- as well as the Motorola Inc. processor used now.Apple's machines now run only on the PowerPC chip, a limitation that has hampered acceptance in a world increasingly dominated by machines featuring Intel chips and Microsoft Corp.
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BUSINESS
By Megan Hartley and Megan Hartley,Sun reporter | February 16, 2008
When Jeff Gordon and Dale Earnhardt Jr. drive in the 50th running of the Daytona 500 tomorrow, they will have some help from a Baltimore company. For the first time in NASCAR history, computerized gauges that monitor such things as oil and fuel pressure will be used in the racecars and enable dashboard warning lights to alert drivers about their engine needs. Only mechanical monitors were allowed in the past because NASCAR officials feared that crews could gain an unfair advantage with the technology known as microcontrollers.
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BUSINESS
By Valerie Rice and Valerie Rice,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 20, 1991
A year ago, deciding which IBM-compatible personal computer to buy was easy.Customers could choose a low-cost computer that used Intel Corp.'s older 80286 microprocessor. Or they could pick a more state-of-the-art computer based on Intel's newer 80386 microprocessor. It's not that simple anymore.Today, buyers face a bewildering number of options because there are now seven or more "flavors" of microprocessors to choose among when buying an IBM-compatible computer."It's getting tougher and tougher for customers," said Marc Lowe, a product marketing manager for Hewlett-Packard Co.'s Vectra personal computer operation.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | November 27, 2003
WASHINGTON - A Chinese woman once hailed as a human rights hero pleaded guilty yesterday to illegally selling advanced technology to China's military. Zhan Gao, a permanent U.S. resident, became a cause celebre two years ago when she was arrested while visiting China and jailed on charges of spying for Taiwan. Gao was allowed to return to the United States after five months, but only after intense pressure from human rights activists and the U.S. government, including a phone call to Chinese President Jiang Zemin from President Bush.
BUSINESS
By Charles Lunan and Charles Lunan,Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | May 18, 1992
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- When IBM, Apple Computer and Motorola last year joined forces to develop a new microprocessor called PowerPC, many analysts figured the power structure of the personal computer industry had shifted forever.By aligning with Apple and Motorola, Big Blue appeared to finally have moved against its partners Microsoft Corp. and Intel Corp. Now it seems IBM was merely hedging its technological bets.While the company is clearly at war with Microsoft over the direction of personal computing software, Intel and IBM have been snuggling ever closer in Boca Raton.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | July 8, 1991
The Intel Corp., confirming what some of its customers have already announced, last week formally introduced a 50-megahertz version of the i486 DX microprocessor.The new chip becomes the fastest and most powerful microprocessor available for personal computers, and it moves us one step closer to the day when the average PC user will have access to the computing power of a mainframe computer.Of course, not everyone needs a mainframe on a chip, especially since computers built around it are expected to cost $10,000 or more when they become widely available later this year.
BUSINESS
By Terril Yue Jones and Terril Yue Jones,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 24, 2003
Chipmaker Advanced Micro Devices Inc. hopes to one-up industry giant Intel Corp. with its new 64-bit microprocessor for PCs. Introduced yesterday, the Athlon 64 is the first 64-bit chip used in desktop computers running Microsoft Corp.'s Windows operating system. AMD, whose chips power about 17 percent of the world's Windows-based PCs, expects the Athlon 64 to be a must-have for speed-hungry game players and to usher in the next generation of super-fast microprocessors. "We're on top of the mountain with a snowball," said Rich Heye, vice president of AMD's microprocessor unit, "and we're going to drop it."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 14, 1992
HOUSTON -- In a bid to battle clone makers and recapture market share, Compaq Computer Corp. will introduce Monday 16 new personal computers and slash prices of its older models. The product introduction includes laptops and PCs powered by Intel Corp.'s most powerful 80486 microprocessor.While more powerful than its older models, the new PC line is less expensive.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 7, 1993
IBM is set to introduce more powerful minicomputers today in the company's latest effort to defend its profitable midsized computer business against increasing competition.The three new models of the IBM AS-400 minicomputer will be up to 80 percent more powerful than the current machines. IBM will also introduce new software and disk storage features to make the AS-400 better able to operate as a "server" -- a central machine feeding and collecting data to and from many workstations linked by a computer network.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | December 5, 1994
Question: What do you get when you cross a Pentium PC with a research grant?Answer: A mad scientist.Jokes like these, making their way across the Internet, underscore users' anger at the Intel Corp. after the disclosure that Intel's newest, hottest microprocessor -- the Pentium -- can produce the wrong answer when it divides one number by another.While Intel says the problem is insignificant and won't affect the vast majority of users, electronic lynch mobs of engineers, mathematicians, astronomers, statisticians, financial analysts and others who depend on precise calculations are gathering in Cyberspace.
BUSINESS
By Terril Yue Jones and Terril Yue Jones,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 24, 2003
Chipmaker Advanced Micro Devices Inc. hopes to one-up industry giant Intel Corp. with its new 64-bit microprocessor for PCs. Introduced yesterday, the Athlon 64 is the first 64-bit chip used in desktop computers running Microsoft Corp.'s Windows operating system. AMD, whose chips power about 17 percent of the world's Windows-based PCs, expects the Athlon 64 to be a must-have for speed-hungry game players and to usher in the next generation of super-fast microprocessors. "We're on top of the mountain with a snowball," said Rich Heye, vice president of AMD's microprocessor unit, "and we're going to drop it."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 16, 2000
PALM SPRINGS, Calif. -- Intel Corp. showed off a new microprocessor, code-named Willamette and running at 1.5 gigahertz, as the world's biggest semiconductor maker continues its race against rivals to have the fastest computer chip. At that speed, 1.5 billion electrical pulses are going through the chip every second to perform computer tasks. Intel's fastest production model chip is a Pentium III running at 800 megahertz, a little more than half as fast. Intel is in a heated race with rival Advanced Micro Devices Inc. to have the fastest chip on the market.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn and Gareth Branwyn,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 1999
It sounds too good to be true: a completely outfitted PC for under $500.This has to be a scheme, a toy computer cobbled together with cheap, trailing edge electronics carelessly stuffed into a wafer-thin plastic case. But the much talked-about eMachine is far from a scheme. For $499 you get an impressive little system that can easily and efficiently handle the jobs required by the average PC user.eMachines Inc. is a U.S. company funded by two Korean manufacturers, TriGem Computer and Korean Data Systems.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | June 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Intel Corp., the world's largest maker of computer chips, became the latest target of government trust-busters yesterday when the Federal Trade Commission voted to charge the company with illegally failing to share key data with its customers.William Baer, director of the FTC's Bureau of Competition, accused Intel of using its paramount position in the chip market as a "club" against three computer makers after relations with the firms had soured in separate licensing, patent and royalty disputes.
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | June 29, 1997
A FEW WEEKS ago, I mentioned that buying a PC was getting complicated because there were so many versions of Intel's Pentium processor floating around.That brought e-mail from a reader who said that if this was so complicated, maybe I should explain it. So here's a little primer to help you understand the stuff you see in the advertisements.First things first. The microprocessor is the heart of your computer. It's an impossibly complicated chip with millions of transistors and integrated circuits that does all the real computing.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | October 31, 1996
MONTEREY, Calif. -- Apple Computer Inc. said yesterday that it will introduce a Macintosh operating system in 1998 that will be able to run on any microprocessor.Chairman Gilbert Amelio, in a speech to analysts and investors, said the new operating system will run some older applications, but will have a new core of software code that enables it to run on chips from Intel Corp., Sun Microsystems Inc. and others -- as well as the Motorola Inc. processor used now.Apple's machines now run only on the PowerPC chip, a limitation that has hampered acceptance in a world increasingly dominated by machines featuring Intel chips and Microsoft Corp.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | April 1, 1991
SAN FRANCISCO -- One of the most lucrative monopolies in American industry was finally broken last week when Advanced Micro Devices formally rolled out its long-awaited clone of Intel's 386 microprocessor, a computer-on-a-chip that forms the brain inside many popular personal computers.But the AMD 386, which remains the focus of a bitter legal battle between AMD and Intel, is expected to capture only a small fraction of the PC microprocessor market. Major personal computer vendors are reluctant to risk alienating Intel by buying the AMD chip, and Intel will soon fight back with cheaper and faster versions of its more advanced 486 microprocessor.
BUSINESS
By San Francisco Chronicle | January 14, 1991
Sales of desktop computers -- the mainstays of the personal-computer industry -- reached their peak last year and will decline for at least the next three years, according to a recently released market-research report.In many cases desktop models will be replaced by cheaper and more versatile notebook-size computers, whose sales are booming, the report indicates.But the increasing popularity of notebook computers -- smaller, more-advanced versions of laptop computers -- will be only one of several factors that hold down sales of desktop models over the next three years, according to a report from Forrester Research Inc., a Cambridge, Mass.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | December 5, 1994
Question: What do you get when you cross a Pentium PC with a research grant?Answer: A mad scientist.Jokes like these, making their way across the Internet, underscore users' anger at the Intel Corp. after the disclosure that Intel's newest, hottest microprocessor -- the Pentium -- can produce the wrong answer when it divides one number by another.While Intel says the problem is insignificant and won't affect the vast majority of users, electronic lynch mobs of engineers, mathematicians, astronomers, statisticians, financial analysts and others who depend on precise calculations are gathering in Cyberspace.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 7, 1993
IBM is set to introduce more powerful minicomputers today in the company's latest effort to defend its profitable midsized computer business against increasing competition.The three new models of the IBM AS-400 minicomputer will be up to 80 percent more powerful than the current machines. IBM will also introduce new software and disk storage features to make the AS-400 better able to operate as a "server" -- a central machine feeding and collecting data to and from many workstations linked by a computer network.
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