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NEWS
May 20, 1997
Scrutiny of water and mud samples found none of the microorganism that had been suspected of harming fish in a lower Eastern Shore river, a Maryland Department of Natural Resources spokesman said yesterday.John Surrick, the spokesman, said a scientist in Florida had tentatively identified Pfiesteria piscicida in the Pocomoke River samples sent to her.But a subsequent examination with an electron microscope indicated the presence of a less toxic microorganism.To allay fishermen's concerns about what may be causing sores on fish in the Pocomoke, state scientists plan to test the river from its mouth to Snow Hill.
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NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2012
The answer to why some obese people develop diabetes and other health problems may be found not in just a love for junk food, but in the bacteria that thrive deep in the human gut. Scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have identified 26 species of intestinal bacteria linked to insulin resistance and the high blood pressure, cholesterol and sugar levels suffered by the obese. These preventable conditions often lead to potentially fatal health problems including stroke, heart disease and diabetes.
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NEWS
By Marcia Myers and D. Quentin Wilber and Marcia Myers and D. Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1997
A North Carolina researcher tentatively linked sick fish in a second Eastern Shore waterway to the Pfiesteria microorganism yesterday, while a Maryland medical team said it has examined 28 people -- 15 more than previously reported -- who may have been sickened by the microbe.Gov. Parris N. Glendening appointed 11 members to a commission to investigate the spreading problem.And in Somerset County last night, 300 residents -- worried about their health and that of their waterways -- packed a high school auditorium hoping to learn more about Pfiesteria.
NEWS
By Robert S. Boyd and Robert S. Boyd,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 26, 2004
Geobacter, a class of bacteria, is tiny and yet so talented that it can turn deadly uranium waste into harmless muck, generate electricity from rust and garbage, and even run a toy car. It's a lot to expect from an invisible bug less than a thousandth of an inch long. But the Energy Department, the Pentagon and the National Science Foundation are exploring the potential of geobacter and related microorganisms to perform useful work. "Geobacter gives us a cheap and simple alternative to a cleaner, safer environment and the generation of cleaner forms of energy," said Derek Lovley, the biologist who discovered the bacteria in 1987 at the muddy bottom of the Potomac River.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1999
New research is proving what scientists long suspected: that the toxic microorganism Pfiesteria piscicida lives in many Maryland rivers and streams, even though it doesn't always kill fish or make people sick.Pfiesteria expert Dr. JoAnn Burkholder has found the dangerous dinoflagellates in samples taken from the bottom muck of five Maryland waterways, including two where it had not been found before. One of those waterways, the St. Martin River, flows into the state's coastal bays west of Ocean City.
NEWS
January 22, 1993
Leo KlineStudied sourdough breadRICHMOND, Calif. -- Leo Kline, a biochemist who discovered the key ingredient that gives San Francisco sourdough bread its tangy flavor, died Jan. 10 of a heart attack at age 76.Before Mr. Kline's discovery, the bread's distinctive flavor was attributed to a combination of the city's fog, local ovens and the skill of San Francisco bakers.After two years of research with colleague T. Frank Sugihara, Mr. Kline discovered Lactobacillus sanfrancisco, a microorganism in sourdough starter that produces lactic acids and acetic acids.
NEWS
August 14, 1997
SHELLTOWN -- State officials reopened yesterday a 4.5-mile stretch of the Pocomoke River on the lower Eastern Shore for fishing, crabbing and other recreational uses."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 10, 1999
In the first study of its kind, neurological and environmental researchers will use a $2 million federal grant to study how the fish-killing microorganism Pfiesteria affects humans, the University of Maryland announced yesterday.The grant, awarded last year by the National Institute of Environmental and Health Science, will be used by a newly formed group that will study the effects of Pfiesteria on the human brain and nervous system.Pfiesteria caused huge fish kills in the Pocomoke River and adjacent Eastern Shore waterways in August 1997.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and D. Quentin Wilber and Tom Pelton and D. Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Dennis O'Brien contributed to this article | August 30, 1997
Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced yesterday that the state has closed a seven-mile stretch of the Pocomoke River because doctors believe a fish-killing microorganism caused rashes or mild memory loss in 13 people exposed to the water.Holding a news conference with top state health officials on the eve of the Labor Day weekend, Glendening said scientists do not believe any other waterways have unhealthy levels of Pfiesteria piscicida or that Chesapeake Bay seafood has been tainted.Although thousands of fish have died in the Eastern Shore river this summer and several watermen and a water-skier there have reported skin rashes, the announcement was the first time Maryland officials have confirmed a link between the microorganism and human illnesses.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1997
WESTOVER -- A high-powered team of medical specialists began a "public health house call" in Somerset County yesterday, examining about a dozen people who have reported getting sick after contact with the Pocomoke River.A toxic microorganism, Pfiesteria piscicida, was found this month in waters at the mouth of the 50-mile-long river, a 4.5-mile stretch of which was closed this month after a significant fish kill.State health officials banned fishing, crabbing and recreation for six days as a public health precaution.
NEWS
By JOEL MCCORD and JOEL MCCORD,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2000
Scientists have discovered in Maryland and Delaware waters the same microorganism responsible for red tides and fish kills in Japan and Norway. It is the first time the organism, Chattonella verruculosa, has appeared in U.S. coastal waters. The organism was found in samples from coastal bays in both states, but the concentrations in Maryland were lower than those in Delaware and were not at toxic levels, according to Rob Magnien, director of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources' tidewater ecosystems division.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 10, 1999
In the first study of its kind, neurological and environmental researchers will use a $2 million federal grant to study how the fish-killing microorganism Pfiesteria affects humans, the University of Maryland announced yesterday.The grant, awarded last year by the National Institute of Environmental and Health Science, will be used by a newly formed group that will study the effects of Pfiesteria on the human brain and nervous system.Pfiesteria caused huge fish kills in the Pocomoke River and adjacent Eastern Shore waterways in August 1997.
NEWS
By JOEL McCORD and JOEL McCORD,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1999
There's an algal bloom just downstream from Shelltown on the Pocomoke River. And there are plenty of menhaden, the fish Pfiesteria feast on. State biologists even found the deadly microorganism, albeit in a benign state, in water taken from the river late last month.These conditions resemble the summer of 1997, the year an outbreak of Pfiesteria piscicida killed fish and sickened people along three rivers on Maryland's lower Eastern Shore. But that doesn't necessarily mean Shore waters are in for another outbreak of lesioned fish circling crazily near the surface before they expire or of people suffering memory loss and disorientation.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1999
Early results from a new study suggest that people who get sick from Pfiesteria once may be much more vulnerable to getting it again.A handful of Marylanders who probably were exposed twice to the toxic microorganism -- once in 1997, at levels high enough to kill fish, and again in 1998 at much lower levels -- appeared to suffer "mild to moderate" short-term memory problems last summer, after their second round of exposure, said University of Maryland neurologist...
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1999
New research is proving what scientists long suspected: that the toxic microorganism Pfiesteria piscicida lives in many Maryland rivers and streams, even though it doesn't always kill fish or make people sick.Pfiesteria expert Dr. JoAnn Burkholder has found the dangerous dinoflagellates in samples taken from the bottom muck of five Maryland waterways, including two where it had not been found before. One of those waterways, the St. Martin River, flows into the state's coastal bays west of Ocean City.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1997
PFIESTERIA piscicida, the toxic microorganism that erupted in Chesapeake waters this summer, was nothing you'd wish for; yet, it could move forward the bay restoration agenda as nothing has in years.Fish with ugly lesions, watermen with acute memory loss, a staggered seafood industry -- these byproducts of Pfiesteria outbreaks were what it took to bring long-needed attention to the bay's biggest, but least sexy, form of water pollution.That would be nutrients -- phosphorus and nitrogen -- in sewage and fertilizer runoff from the land.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1997
Warning that outbreaks of a fish-killing microorganism are likely to strike Chesapeake Bay tributaries again next year, Gov. Parris N. Glendening told his commission on Pfiesteria yesterday that it doesn't need to find a smoking gun before recommending strong action."
NEWS
By D. Quentin Wilber; and Timothy B. Wheeler and D. Quentin Wilber; and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1997
VIENNA -- State officials closed a 6-mile stretch of a Dorchester County river yesterday after discovering thousands of dying fish with sores 17 miles north of the last documented fish lesion outbreak on the Eastern Shore.Gov. Parris N. Glendening ordered state health and natural resources officials to ban people from a portion of the Chicamacomico River around Drawbridge Road yesterday afternoon, nearly a day after state officials first found fish in distress there.The Chicamacomico, which snakes through flat marsh and farmland in eastern Dorchester, is the third water body closed on the Lower Shore in the past month because of a suspected outbreak of Pfiesteria piscicida -- a toxic single-celled microorganism blamed for fish lesions and for causing human ailments on another river.
NEWS
By JACK GREER AND MERRILL LEFFLER | October 12, 1997
All along the waterfront of the Chesapeake Bay - and far inland to our city streets and dinner tables - Pfiesteria piscicida has traveled like a rumor, picking up momentum along the way. (( In May, a Sun article ran under the headline "Fish-killing organism found in the Pocomoke." Two weeks later, the headline read: "Has microscopic monster moved into bay?" A week after that, the Washington Post led with "The Feeding Frenzy of a Morphing 'Cell from Hell.' "What exactly is this one-celled creature?
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | October 2, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Suddenly, with Maryland's primary election less than a year away, the state's political Muscle Beach is eerily deserted. Whatever happened to all those fire-breathing Democratic candidates for governor who were going to kick sand in Parris Glendening's face?Congressman Ben Cardin, having learned to his astonishment that in Maryland the office of governor is not appointive, has scurried back to Washington to instruct the Republicans there about ethics in government. Cas Taylor, the speaker of the House of Delegates, has vanished into the Cumberland gap.The departure of these two awesome rivals leaves Mr. Glendening almost alone on the beach.
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