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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2001
Nicholas Paroway lived through the birth of this nation and the Civil War. He led Carroll's annual Fourth of July parade for years and often related his memories of the Colonial era. But little would be known of the former slave, who was born in 1766 and lived to be 110 years old, were it not for the American Sentinel. The weekly newspaper, published in Westminster from 1850 to 1932, was the only printed record with news of African-Americans. The paper exists today as clippings in family albums, in bound volumes at museums and on rolls of microfilm scattered around the state.
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FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | July 20, 2006
Here are famous moments from the "herstory" of bras, as culled from Stephanie Pedersen's book, Bra: A Thousand Years of Style, Support and Seduction: Catherine de Medici may be best known for her finesse at concocting and administering poisons. Along that vein, she is credited - if that's the word - for popularizing the corset as de rigueur daily wear in the mid-16th century. As the young bride of Henry II of France, de Medici was proud of her slender figure, and she famously declared a ban on thick waists at court.
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BUSINESS
By Eleanor Yang and Eleanor Yang,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1997
Gary DeGourse and Steve Roderick are doing more than their share to bring people closer to the paperless society.In the past 19 years, they've built Micrographics Specialties Inc. from a basement operation that put images on microfilm into a multimillion-dollar information management company.And in their newest endeavor, they are digitizing images for the Internet. Next month, their $1 million deal with the National Archives Records Administration will launch a web site displaying some of their 120,000 scanned photos, maps and drawings.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2001
Nicholas Paroway lived through the birth of this nation and the Civil War. He led Carroll's annual Fourth of July parade for years and often related his memories of the Colonial era. But little would be known of the former slave, who was born in 1766 and lived to be 110 years old, were it not for the American Sentinel. The weekly newspaper, published in Westminster from 1850 to 1932, was the only printed record with news of African-Americans. The paper exists today as clippings in family albums, in bound volumes at museums and on rolls of microfilm scattered around the state.
NEWS
September 13, 1998
NOTE: Please see microfilm or hard copy for the Sun's Special Section on the Starr Report.Pub Date: 9/13/98
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Levy and By Sandy Levy,Sun Staff | April 15, 2001
"Double Fold: Libraries and the Assault on Paper," by Nicholson Baker. Random House. 370 pages. $25.95. Nicholson Baker is mad at hell at librarians, and he's not going to take it anymore. According to Baker, public and academic libraries have betrayed their public trust by exchanging priceless collections of books and old newspapers for microfilm, merely to save space. Baker argues that this was a devil's bargain, the result of a bill of goods sold to institutional libraries over the past half century by individuals interested only in promoting microfilm.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | October 25, 1994
THIS IS THE time children get excited about the carving of the pumpkin. Nothing like a jack-o-lantern to bring on the thrills and -- chills of Halloween.But for some of the grandparents of such kids, pumpkins harken to a chilling local incident, not Halloween related.It happened in a Carroll County garden on the night of Dec. 2, 1948. By morning of the next day, a lone orange gourd would be the most famous pumpkin in America. It would put the phrase "Pumpkin Papers" into the language.At about 10 o'clock that night, three men came out of the back door of a white farmhouse on Pipe Creek Farm off Bachman Valley Road near Westminster headed for a small pumpkin patch.
NEWS
April 10, 1993
When a newspaperman lives on into his ninth decade, old clippings yellow, dust settles on microfilm and the great events and people of yesteryear fade into fleeting memory. Such was the fate of Ernie Baugh, for 56 years a reporter and editorial writer for this newspaper. If he had not died this week, he would still be around to tell us he had had a pretty good life.Those clippings and microfilm, after all, are a touch of immortality bestowed on only a comparatively few mortals. Who knows what researcher in what year will chance across Mr. Baugh's work as he writes the definitive history of Baltimore's one-sixth political bosses or hi-jinks at the General Assembly?
NEWS
By Staff report | December 5, 1991
The clerk of the county Circuit Court yesterday announced a proposalto turn over photocopying work in the court house to private industry as a possible cost-cutting move.Clerk Mary M. Rose said the move would eliminate from the budget $224,000 in maintenance, supplies and employee salaries and benefits needed to operate the "photostat department," which reproduces land records, plats and docket entries for the public. She said it would also eliminate the need to replace orupgrade existing equipment.
NEWS
By Christian Science Monitor | January 4, 1995
SAN DIEGO -- For more than a century, members of the Modern Language Association have come together once a year to talk about literature -- the stuff bound up (mostly) in books. This time, the book itself became a focal point of the group's annual meeting, held here recently."The future of the print record is jeopardized," says J. Hillis Miller, former president of the association, known as the MLA.What scholars are realizing is something that librarians started to investigate 40 years ago: Millions of volumes are turning to dust on U.S. library shelves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Levy and By Sandy Levy,Sun Staff | April 15, 2001
"Double Fold: Libraries and the Assault on Paper," by Nicholson Baker. Random House. 370 pages. $25.95. Nicholson Baker is mad at hell at librarians, and he's not going to take it anymore. According to Baker, public and academic libraries have betrayed their public trust by exchanging priceless collections of books and old newspapers for microfilm, merely to save space. Baker argues that this was a devil's bargain, the result of a bill of goods sold to institutional libraries over the past half century by individuals interested only in promoting microfilm.
NEWS
September 13, 1998
NOTE: Please see microfilm or hard copy for the Sun's Special Section on the Starr Report.Pub Date: 9/13/98
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 28, 1997
LAUREL -- Now baseball has moved indoors. Now is the season of bookshelf, microfilm reader, get-together with other students of the game at a Great Western motel here. Now to assay what all went on, or broke off, during 1997 or any other year.The Washington-Baltimore Chapter of the Society for American Baseball Research is in annual, daylong session. Old and young, men and women, 80-some members of SABR (pronounced "saber") start with mental warm-ups. Bob Davids presides.Who are the only two brothers to have pitched no-hitters in the majors?
BUSINESS
By Eleanor Yang and Eleanor Yang,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1997
Gary DeGourse and Steve Roderick are doing more than their share to bring people closer to the paperless society.In the past 19 years, they've built Micrographics Specialties Inc. from a basement operation that put images on microfilm into a multimillion-dollar information management company.And in their newest endeavor, they are digitizing images for the Internet. Next month, their $1 million deal with the National Archives Records Administration will launch a web site displaying some of their 120,000 scanned photos, maps and drawings.
NEWS
By Christian Science Monitor | January 4, 1995
SAN DIEGO -- For more than a century, members of the Modern Language Association have come together once a year to talk about literature -- the stuff bound up (mostly) in books. This time, the book itself became a focal point of the group's annual meeting, held here recently."The future of the print record is jeopardized," says J. Hillis Miller, former president of the association, known as the MLA.What scholars are realizing is something that librarians started to investigate 40 years ago: Millions of volumes are turning to dust on U.S. library shelves.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | October 25, 1994
THIS IS THE time children get excited about the carving of the pumpkin. Nothing like a jack-o-lantern to bring on the thrills and -- chills of Halloween.But for some of the grandparents of such kids, pumpkins harken to a chilling local incident, not Halloween related.It happened in a Carroll County garden on the night of Dec. 2, 1948. By morning of the next day, a lone orange gourd would be the most famous pumpkin in America. It would put the phrase "Pumpkin Papers" into the language.At about 10 o'clock that night, three men came out of the back door of a white farmhouse on Pipe Creek Farm off Bachman Valley Road near Westminster headed for a small pumpkin patch.
FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | July 20, 2006
Here are famous moments from the "herstory" of bras, as culled from Stephanie Pedersen's book, Bra: A Thousand Years of Style, Support and Seduction: Catherine de Medici may be best known for her finesse at concocting and administering poisons. Along that vein, she is credited - if that's the word - for popularizing the corset as de rigueur daily wear in the mid-16th century. As the young bride of Henry II of France, de Medici was proud of her slender figure, and she famously declared a ban on thick waists at court.
NEWS
April 10, 1993
When a newspaperman lives on into his ninth decade, old clippings yellow, dust settles on microfilm and the great events and people of yesteryear fade into fleeting memory. Such was the fate of Ernie Baugh, for 56 years a reporter and editorial writer for this newspaper. If he had not died this week, he would still be around to tell us he had had a pretty good life.Those clippings and microfilm, after all, are a touch of immortality bestowed on only a comparatively few mortals. Who knows what researcher in what year will chance across Mr. Baugh's work as he writes the definitive history of Baltimore's one-sixth political bosses or hi-jinks at the General Assembly?
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