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NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | October 25, 2008
A year and a half ago, Conjus the cat stalked out of Jennifer Daniel's home and, it appeared, out of her life forever. For weeks, Daniel drove slowly through the streets near her home in Fort Meade, searching for the small gray-and-black tabby. Eventually, she decided the cat had met an untimely end and gave up. This week, she got a phone call: Conjus had been found and identified by a microchip implanted in the scruff of her neck. Daniel, 27, was astonished and delighted. Conjus appeared unfazed.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
When health department inspectors visited a Southwest Baltimore horse stable last year, they found a place with dangerously exposed electrical outlets, stalls on the verge of collapse and trash strewn about the premises. They closed the site at 207 Bruce St., long a home base for arabbers, the street peddlers who have sold fresh food from the backs of horse-drawn wagons for generations. A year later, a new owner is poised to reopen the facility, the third such site in town and a historic one at more than 100 years old. But she had to make a thoroughly modern concession to bring it back to life.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1997
More than two hours after scores of Baltimore's finest began chasing a suspected bank robber over what seemed like half the city, a cryptic call crackled over the police radio: "The hound has caught the rabbit."The message confirmed what has been the Police Department's most closely guarded secret in its war against bank holdups. Baltimore's bank robbery rate is among the highest in the nation.For the past month, local banks have been inserting tiny electronic tracking devices into packs of money that tellers give to bank robbers.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez and For The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
My family and I were cruising down a very busy six-lane road on our way to dinner two years ago when my husband suddenly hit the brakes. Two loose yellow labs cowered in the middle of the road. It was one of those trillion-degree August days and the dogs were hot, exhausted and frightened. We got them into our car, took them home, gave them a drink, and called the animal shelter, where employees said no one had reported them missing. My vet's office was due to close in five minutes, but a technician agreed to stay open long enough for me to get there (I love my vet)
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2001
Baltimore would become the nation's first city to require that pit bulls and other dogs bred to be "fighting animals" have an implanted microchip indicating they have been spayed or neutered, under legislation planned by the city's health commissioner. Dr. Peter L. Beilenson said the plan might be the best way to prevent savage dog attacks such as the one suffered by a 7-year-old girl in Southwest Baltimore Friday. The implant would enable animal control officers to determine instantly whether the dog has been "fixed" - and if it hasn't, to seize the dog immediately.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2007
Microchip Technology Inc. Shares dropped $4.64, or 12 percent, to $31.98 after the maker of analog processors for home appliances reported second-quarter profit that missed analysts' estimates amid slowing demand.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
A family was reunited over the holidays with their dog that had been missing four years. Dodger disappeared while the Willey Family of Owings Mills was away. They thought he had been safe inside, but when they got home, the Collie mix was gone, with no signs of  how he got out. They searched everywhere and called all the local shelters -- no luck. But on Dec. 27, an older Collie was found on Honeysuckle Lane in Severna Park. A good samaratin brought the dog to Anne Arundel County Animal Control.
FEATURES
By Michael Walsh and Michael Walsh,Universal Press Syndicate | September 8, 1991
Sooner or later, I'm convinced, all the microchips we've recruited to make our lives easier are going to turn on us all at the same time.My telephone answering machine, for instance, is induced by a clap of thunder to make a telephone call ON ITS OWN.Whom the machine is calling remains a mystery. But somehow it reaches that mechanical voice from the telephone company that says something like: "The number you have dialed is no longer in service. Please check the listing and try your call again."
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | October 21, 2008
OAKLAND - A confession: At this year's black bear hunt, I am rooting for the bear. Not every bear. Just one. With each black bear brought to the check station at Mount Nebo Wildlife Management Area, I hold my breath. Will the animal being weighed and inspected by state biologists be the one I held in my arms a little more than two years ago? So far, the bear known to the state as 472C4E7628, most likely a resident of Allegany County, has escaped hunters. The male bear must weigh about 200 pounds now, but when I saw him in April 2006, he and his three tiny den mates were nestled around their 238-pound mother, who was taking a nap induced by two tranquilizer darts.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
When their dog disappeared four years ago, the Willey family of Owings Mills searched and searched. They combed their neighborhood, they called everyone they could think of and then they called them again. For months. But eventually they gave up. And then they moved -- and then moved again. The dog, a bushy Collie named Dodger, had been the family dog for years. And for years before that, the big dog with honey-colored spots had belonged to someone else. William Douglas Willey's ex-wife brought him home one day after his other owner died.
FEATURES
October 18, 2012
I was thinking of microchipping my dog, but he always has a collar, so should I bother? If your beloved pet has ever been lost, you know that is not a feeling you want to experience again. A collar with an identification tag is your first, best option to having your pet returned to you quickly, but tags may fall off the collar, and collars can be removed or accidentally pulled off. I have taken many lost-dog reports from frantic owners whose dogs have gotten out of the house right after bath time, and they were not wearing their collars and tags.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
When their dog disappeared four years ago, the Willey family of Owings Mills searched and searched. They combed their neighborhood, they called everyone they could think of and then they called them again. For months. But eventually they gave up. And then they moved -- and then moved again. The dog, a bushy Collie named Dodger, had been the family dog for years. And for years before that, the big dog with honey-colored spots had belonged to someone else. William Douglas Willey's ex-wife brought him home one day after his other owner died.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2012
A family was reunited over the holidays with their dog that had been missing four years. Dodger disappeared while the Willey Family of Owings Mills was away. They thought he had been safe inside, but when they got home, the Collie mix was gone, with no signs of  how he got out. They searched everywhere and called all the local shelters -- no luck. But on Dec. 27, an older Collie was found on Honeysuckle Lane in Severna Park. A good samaratin brought the dog to Anne Arundel County Animal Control.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | October 25, 2008
A year and a half ago, Conjus the cat stalked out of Jennifer Daniel's home and, it appeared, out of her life forever. For weeks, Daniel drove slowly through the streets near her home in Fort Meade, searching for the small gray-and-black tabby. Eventually, she decided the cat had met an untimely end and gave up. This week, she got a phone call: Conjus had been found and identified by a microchip implanted in the scruff of her neck. Daniel, 27, was astonished and delighted. Conjus appeared unfazed.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | October 21, 2008
OAKLAND - A confession: At this year's black bear hunt, I am rooting for the bear. Not every bear. Just one. With each black bear brought to the check station at Mount Nebo Wildlife Management Area, I hold my breath. Will the animal being weighed and inspected by state biologists be the one I held in my arms a little more than two years ago? So far, the bear known to the state as 472C4E7628, most likely a resident of Allegany County, has escaped hunters. The male bear must weigh about 200 pounds now, but when I saw him in April 2006, he and his three tiny den mates were nestled around their 238-pound mother, who was taking a nap induced by two tranquilizer darts.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2007
Microchip Technology Inc. Shares dropped $4.64, or 12 percent, to $31.98 after the maker of analog processors for home appliances reported second-quarter profit that missed analysts' estimates amid slowing demand.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | May 5, 1991
Tokyo - America's small band of surviving computer-chip makers feel they are getting their foot in the door here at last, after more than a decade of one of the most acrimonious of all the scores of Japan-U.S. trade disputes.But the five-year government agreement that got them that far expires in July, and they want it extended so they can finish making their sales pitches.Japanese and U.S. government delegations began talks last month on an extension. The United States hopes that by July the agreement will have been extended at least through the end of next year.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2005
At a time when most U.S. companies have long since surrendered electronic assembly work to overseas rivals, Axalto Inc. is taking a different tack. After spending millions to upgrade its plant in Owings Mills, the U.S. unit of a French company has turned itself into the only start-to-finish producer of microchip-laden "smart cards" in the United States. Now it's boosting production as it counts on that capability to grab a larger share of an exploding market. "That was our goal," said Louis W. Bisasky, a three-decade veteran of the company who now serves as its plant and operations manager.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | April 13, 2007
Laura Patzer, 17, a junior at Mariotts Ridge High School, couldn't get poor Pluto out of her head after the cold blue rock was demoted from planet to dwarf planet. So she decided to make a movie imagining the scene at the "council of planets" when Pluto was kicked out. Her film, called Planets, is one of 18 that will be shown tonight at the third Howard County Film Festival at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. "It's a comedy, like a parody of popular film, where Pluto is being kicked off the council of the planets," Patzer said.
NEWS
By ALIA MALIK and ALIA MALIK,SUN REPORTER | August 13, 2006
The lowly pet collar is going high-tech. Within the next two months, Anne Arundel County will offer a new way for owners to reunite with their lost pets: a tiny microchip injected under their skin. It will expand a pilot program begun in May for people who are adopting or picking up lost cats or dogs at Animal Control headquarters in Millersville. Animal Control will host clinics for pet owners where they can have a veterinarian implant a microchip the size of a grain of rice between their pets' shoulder blades, said county police Lt. Jonathan Church, who oversees Animal Control.
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