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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | May 10, 1994
Mount Airy residents who oppose a proposed microbrewery in the old firehouse on Main Street told the town's Board of Appeals last night that the business would sully Mount Airy's image, erode family values and contribute to alcohol abuse."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
Good news for Abell is bad news for Highlandtown . Plans to convert the old Haussner's space into a microbrewery have been scrapped. The news that brewer Stephen Demczuk had signed a lease for the oldCapital Beverage Corp. bottling plant in Abell means that Demczuk won't be going into Haussner's after all. Last June , Demczuk was considering Haussner's as the site for a German-style "guest-house" and microbrewery. Demczuk's plans were supported by the Highlandtown community and business associations.
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NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | July 19, 1994
A proposal to build a microbrewery beside the Ram's Head Tavern in downtown Annapolis drew some tough questions from the City Council, but no public opposition at a public hearing last night.W. M. Enterprises, owner of the Ram's Head at 33 West St., is seeking approval to establish the microbrewery, which would produce about 3,000 barrels of lager and ale a year."This is very consistent with everything we've talked about for this block of West Street," said Eileen Fogarty, city planning director.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2012
This Spring, Frisco Tap and Brew House in Columbia will open a seven-barrel microbrewery under the name Push Craft Brewing.  Brewing his own beer has always been an ambition of owner Adam Carton; when he designed the restaurant, which is known for its 50 taps , he included space for a brewery. Indeed, its name suggested it was already able to make its own beer. But Carton was waiting for the business, which has been at its new location at 6695 Dobbin Road for a year, to mature.
NEWS
May 23, 1997
Fear that Mount Airy could lose its first and only microbrewery -- viewed as a key element in revitalizing downtown -- has prompted town officials to excuse the owners from making two required improvements.The planning commission voted Monday to replace South Main Street Mount Airy Brewing Co. and Firehouse Grill's temporary use and occupancy permit with a permanent one, despite the owners' failure to pave the parking lot and screen a trash container.Enforcement of the two remaining conditions -- from a list of seven that were to be met by May 30 -- "might tip the scales" of the business' viability, said Chairman Keith Gehle.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | April 26, 1994
Mount Airy Firehouse Beer came a step closer to reality last night as the town Planning and Zoning Commission voted to recommend allowing the proposed microbrewery as a special exception.The proposal will be considered by the town's Board of Special Appeals at a public hearing May 9.Robert Hilton, agent for the still-unidentified buyer, said the potential brew master intends to open a restaurant-brewery in time for the town's Fall Festival in October. State laws require microbreweries to have a restaurant on site, and beer they brew may be sold only at the restaurant or to a distributor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2012
This Spring, Frisco Tap and Brew House in Columbia will open a seven-barrel microbrewery under the name Push Craft Brewing.  Brewing his own beer has always been an ambition of owner Adam Carton; when he designed the restaurant, which is known for its 50 taps , he included space for a brewery. Indeed, its name suggested it was already able to make its own beer. But Carton was waiting for the business, which has been at its new location at 6695 Dobbin Road for a year, to mature.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | May 11, 1994
The Mount Airy Board of Appeals voted 3-2 Monday night to grant a special exception to a proposed microbrewery, despite protests from local church members that a brewery would destory the town's family image and promote alcohol abuse.Michael Trammel, pastor of Mount Airy Baptist Church, expressed disappointment after the vote."I had hoped that there would be a greater concern for the moral considerations and for the overall image of our community," Mr. Trammel said. "There's nobody considering the potential impact this is going to have on families and the potential damage to lives and marriages."
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | September 10, 1999
Herb Shaffer lifts his beer mug and admires its contents -- a dark, chocolate-brown stout topped with a good inch of creamy white mousse. He inhales to take in the full aroma. Then, after taking a long, deep swallow, he slowly places the mug on the table in front of him. After a moment of silence, he exclaims with great satisfaction in his voice: "This is real beer!"Seated across from Shaffer, Dan Sadler prepares to take a ceremonial first sip from his mug, only his choice of beer is lighter in color -- an India Pale Ale.Both men belong to a growing number of beer geeks -- connoisseurs of hearty, flavorful crafted suds.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | August 10, 1994
Can a microbrewery survive without serving beer?The answer is no, according to the Carroll County Liquor Board, which voted yesterday to allow the owners of a proposed microbrewery in Mount Airy to serve alcohol before completing 90 days of operation strictly as a restaurant.The decision marks the first time the board has waived its 90-day regulation and the first time it has considered an application for a restaurant-microbrewery.A. Reid Allison III, a Seattle lawyer who wants to open the county's first microbrewery in the old Mount Airy firehouse, argued that he would have difficulty obtaining financing for his project if he had to abide by the 90-day rule.
EXPLORE
September 23, 2011
The website for the Maryland Microbrewery Festival is reporting on Friday, Sept. 23, that the festival — scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 24, at Union Mills Homestead, Westminster — has been canceled. According to the site — the event was canceled due to the forecast for "severe weather conditions and possible flash flooding. " "We regret this decision and will refund through Paypal advanced ticket sales," according to the posting on the website — http://www.marylandmicrobreweryfestival.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2011
After I blogged about the popularity of public tours at Flying Dog's Frederick brewery , a small debate flared up on Twitter over what's allowed and not allowed at Maryland breweries.  Readers wondered if microbreweries could function as bars and if they had to participate in the tours to buy beer directly from the brewers. Also, what about samples?? Can you tell us about samples?  Here are the basic rules: In Maryland, there are two levels of licenses for breweries, one for brewpubs and one for wholesale manufacturers.
NEWS
By REED JOHNSON and REED JOHNSON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 20, 2006
HAVANA -- In the once-crumbling Plaza Vieja in Old Havana, a European men's clothing store has opened its expensively refurbished doors a few yards from a fancy new Austrian microbrewery. The clothing store's plush, wood-lined interior is stocked with upscale sporting and casual wear reminiscent of Brooks Brothers or L.L. Bean, while the microbrewery's sparkling counters, mood lighting, and clientele of tourists and laid-back residents seem more Caribbean party hot spot than one-party socialist state.
NEWS
By Kory Dodd and Kory Dodd,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2003
A resolution scheduled for discussion at tomorrow's Annapolis city council meeting could reignite the city's long-standing debate over bar closing times in the city's downtown. The resolution, introduced by Ward 7 Alderman Michael W. Fox, would allow microbrewery pub owners to apply for an exemption that would allow them to remain open until 2 a.m. Fox said it is a first step in his plan to introduce legislation that would create a citywide exemption for microbreweries. But Ward 1 Alderwoman Louise Hammond and downtown residents are furious that the licensing issue is being revisited.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | June 9, 2002
THE HEIGHT of the mania in microbrewery investment, which came three years before the crest of a similar psychosis in Internet finance, can be identified with some precision. On Feb. 12, 1997, Frederick Brewing Co. held grand-opening rites at a big, beautiful, amber-brown factory near where Interstate 270 splits from Interstate 70 in Western Maryland. The building would soon contain enough brew kettles, mash mixers, fermenters and bottling lines to make 80,000 barrels of beer annually.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | July 22, 2001
I love the way comfort food has gone upscale. Nowhere is that more evident than at the new Bare Bones in Cockeysville. It used to be you'd go to a rib joint and you'd get some barbecue and a beer. Nowadays you go to a rib joint (Bare Bones), you open the menu and you find the brewmaster has beer suggestions for each entree because the restaurant has its own microbrewery. Should I have the Savage Mill Porter or the Tiber River Red with the barbecued chicken and ribs combo? Actually I'm trying to decide why both are appropriate with the chicken and ribs, but only the Tiber River Red will complement the barbecued shrimp and ribs.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1997
The Rev. John R. Scamehorn is all for economic development in Hampstead. But he draws the line at microbreweries next door to his Main Street church, St. John's United Methodist.Scamehorn's concern stems from a request by Hampstead Mayor Christopher M. Nevin that a provision limiting the distance between microbreweries and churches be dropped from a locally sponsored bill before the General Assembly.Nevin said the restrictions -- which require that microbreweries be more than 300 feet from places of worship -- would hinder Hampstead's downtown revitalization efforts.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1996
Huge stores, microbrews.That's the pitch being delivered by the Canadian-born owners of Rocky Run Tap & Grill, who plan to open their restaurant next month near the new Columbia Crossing retail "power center" in east Columbia. The Rocky Run owners plan to open a microbrewery inside the restaurant later.Rocky Run will open inside the former Bob's Big Boy Family Restaurant off Dobbin Road. "The location was selected because the town of Columbia's retail focus is moving towards Route 175 and Dobbin Road," the restaurateurs said in a news release.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 5, 2000
Bare Bones Grill and Brewery has been in St. John's Plaza since 1988, but the business really took off after a microbrewery was added three years ago. Partners Steve McClune and Joe Reese were fraternity brothers at Penn State, where they graduated with degrees in food service. McClune became a vice president at the Holiday Inns around Baltimore, while Reese ran a chain called Pappy's Pizza. When Pappy's went belly-up, Reese converted the Gaithersburg location into a rib place. Seven years later, in 1988, Bare Bones opened in Ellicott City.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | September 10, 1999
Herb Shaffer lifts his beer mug and admires its contents -- a dark, chocolate-brown stout topped with a good inch of creamy white mousse. He inhales to take in the full aroma. Then, after taking a long, deep swallow, he slowly places the mug on the table in front of him. After a moment of silence, he exclaims with great satisfaction in his voice: "This is real beer!"Seated across from Shaffer, Dan Sadler prepares to take a ceremonial first sip from his mug, only his choice of beer is lighter in color -- an India Pale Ale.Both men belong to a growing number of beer geeks -- connoisseurs of hearty, flavorful crafted suds.
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