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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2004
Andrew George Smith, who taught microbiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, died of an infection and complications from Alzheimer's disease Sept. 2 at Joseph Richey Hospice. The Ellicott City resident was 86. Dr. Smith was born in Williamsport, Pa., and he earned his undergraduate degree in microbiology and chemistry at Pennsylvania State College at State College, Pa. He worked in a dairy and in Philadelphia pharmaceutical laboratories before joining the Marine Corps.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 12, 2014
The Baltimore Sun Sister Mary Jacinta Robson, a retired medical technologist who spent six decades at Mercy Medical Center, died there of congestive heart failure Feb. 7. She was 88. "She had been a beloved presence at the hospital for over 60 years and worked in the microbiology department for decades, and in later years was a hospital volunteer," said Sister Irene Callahan, a fellow member of Sisters of Mercy. Born Clara Jane Robson in Baltimore and raised on Ridgewood Avenue, she was the daughter of Alonzo Robson, a clerk, and Goldie Updegraff Robson, a homemaker.
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NEWS
March 12, 2006
Karim Mehrazar, a professor of microbiology and immunology at Morgan State University, died of stomach cancer March 5 at Chesapeake Hospice in Linthicum. The Millersville resident was 52. Dr. Mehrazar was born and raised in Tabriz, Iran, and earned a bachelor's degree in medical technology from Tabriz University in 1975. After completing obligatory military service in the Iranian Royal Air Force, he enrolled at Indiana State University, where he earned a master's degree in microbiology in 1981.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | October 22, 2009
Michael J. Pelczar Jr., a retired University of Maryland microbiology professor who later headed the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, died of a stroke Oct. 13 at his Kent Island farm. He was 93. Dr. Pelczar, the son of a real estate salesman and homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in eastern Baltimore County. After graduating from Kenwood High School, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1936 in microbiology from the University of Maryland, College Park. He earned a master's degree in microbiology in 1938 and his doctorate in 1941 from the University of Maryland.
NEWS
March 26, 1992
Harriette Dryden Vera, retired director of research and quality control for Becton Dickinson Microbiology Systems and an expert on culture media for growing bacteria, died of pneumonia March 14 at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center.A memorial service for Dr. Vera, who was 83, will be held at 3 p.m. tomorrow at Edenwald, 800 Southerly Road, the Towson retirement community where she lived.She retired 10 years ago after holding the same post since going to work for what was the Baltimore Biological Laboratory in the early 1940s.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | October 22, 2009
Michael J. Pelczar Jr., a retired University of Maryland microbiology professor who later headed the Council of Graduate Schools in Washington, died of a stroke Oct. 13 at his Kent Island farm. He was 93. Dr. Pelczar, the son of a real estate salesman and homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in eastern Baltimore County. After graduating from Kenwood High School, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1936 in microbiology from the University of Maryland, College Park. He earned a master's degree in microbiology in 1938 and his doctorate in 1941 from the University of Maryland.
NEWS
November 18, 1990
Services for Dr. Rudolph Almaraz, a surgical oncologist, wil be held at 7 p.m. tomorrow at the Ruck Towson Funeral Home Inc., 1050 York Road.Dr. Almaraz died Friday at his home in Parkton after a lonillness. He was 41.Born in San Antonio, he received a bachelor's degree from St. Mary's University there in 1971. He earned his medical degree and a master's degree in microbiology from the University of Texas in 1975 and a doctorate from George Washington University in 1981.After completing a surgical internship and residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital, he was appointed surgeon-in-chief of surgical oncology and endocrinology until 1985, when he began a private practice.
NEWS
January 18, 1994
Donald E. ShayTaught microbiologyDonald E. Shay, retired professor of microbiology at the University of Maryland dental school, died Jan. 6 of cancer at his home in Linthicum Heights. He was 80.He retired in 1980 as chairman of the department and as assistant dean for biological sciences.He started teaching at UM in 1945, when his department served both the dental and pharmacy schools.He was a former secretary of the American Society of Microbiology and for 10 years after his retirement was chairman of its archives committee.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2003
J. Mehsen Joseph, who served as Laboratories Administration director for the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene since 1977, died Wednesday at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson of complications from diabetes. He was 74 and had worked at the department for 46 years. Born in Whitesville, W.Va., Dr. Joseph was the first in his family to attend college. His parents were Lebanese immigrants. At age 20, after graduating from West Virginia University in three years, he went on to Columbia University for his master's degree.
NEWS
March 26, 1992
Harriette D. Vera, noted expert in microbiologyA memorial service for Harriette Dryden Vera, retired director of research and quality control for Becton Dickinson Microbiology Systems and an expert on culture media for growing bacteria, will be held at 3 p.m. tomorrow at Edenwald, 800 Southerly Road, Towson.Dr. Vera, who was 83 and lived at the Towson retirement community, died of pneumonia March 14 at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center.She retired 10 years ago after holding the same post since going to work for what was the Baltimore Biological Laboratory in the early 1940s.
NEWS
March 12, 2006
Karim Mehrazar, a professor of microbiology and immunology at Morgan State University, died of stomach cancer March 5 at Chesapeake Hospice in Linthicum. The Millersville resident was 52. Dr. Mehrazar was born and raised in Tabriz, Iran, and earned a bachelor's degree in medical technology from Tabriz University in 1975. After completing obligatory military service in the Iranian Royal Air Force, he enrolled at Indiana State University, where he earned a master's degree in microbiology in 1981.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2004
Andrew George Smith, who taught microbiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, died of an infection and complications from Alzheimer's disease Sept. 2 at Joseph Richey Hospice. The Ellicott City resident was 86. Dr. Smith was born in Williamsport, Pa., and he earned his undergraduate degree in microbiology and chemistry at Pennsylvania State College at State College, Pa. He worked in a dairy and in Philadelphia pharmaceutical laboratories before joining the Marine Corps.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2003
J. Mehsen Joseph, who served as Laboratories Administration director for the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene since 1977, died Wednesday at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson of complications from diabetes. He was 74 and had worked at the department for 46 years. Born in Whitesville, W.Va., Dr. Joseph was the first in his family to attend college. His parents were Lebanese immigrants. At age 20, after graduating from West Virginia University in three years, he went on to Columbia University for his master's degree.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2003
West Nile virus got its name from the district in Uganda where it was first identified. Epstein-Barr virus received its moniker from the researchers who initially described it. Arenavirus was so dubbed for its grainy look: The Latin word "arena" means sand. The new coronavirus responsible for the worldwide outbreak of SARS has yet to be officially named. But some researchers have already weighed in. They want to honor Carlo Urbani, the World Health Organization physician who died of the illness and was among the first to identify it. One suggestion: "Urbani SARS-associated coronavirus."
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2002
A few years ago physicists Rod Hyde and Sham Dixit set out to design a space telescope big enough to study planets outside our solar system. But the duo, who work at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, quickly hit a major snag: How would they get their mammoth instrument into space? To see planets so far away, the scientists figured the telescope would require a lens at least 160 feet in diameter. Trouble is, NASA's biggest moving van can hold objects only about a tenth that size.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1997
Becton Dickinson Microbiology Systems will close five plants in Wisconsin and Michigan that employ 450 people over the next two years, but add 150 to 200 jobs in the Baltimore area.Donald R. Daut, director of North American Operations for Becton Dickinson Microbiology Systems, which has headquarters in Sparks, said yesterday the moves were part of "an ongoing review of overall efficiencies."He said it was not yet determined how many of the positions here would be filled by transfers from the Midwest and how many would represent new hires.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1997
Becton Dickinson & Co. announced yesterday that it will buy Difco Laboratories Inc., which will become part of Becton Dickinson Microbiology Systems, with headquarters in Sparks.According to company spokesmen, the transaction is unlikely to have any immediate impact on employment in Maryland. The company has about 1,700 employees in Sparks and in a facility in Hunt Valley.Becton Dickinson, with corporate headquarters in Franklin Lakes, N.J., makes medical supplies and equipment, with revenue for the year ending in September of $2.8 billion.
NEWS
December 22, 1993
Paul A. Rohde Sr.Medical technologistPaul A. Rohde Sr., a retired medical technologist and laboratory official, died Saturday of cancer at his home in Towson. He was 77.He retired in 1983 as the manager of pharmaceutical sales for Becton Dickinson Microbiology Systems of Hunt Valley and was a consultant to the company at the time of his death.He began his career before World War II as assistant director of laboratories for the Maryland health department. In 1948, he joined Baltimore Biological Laboratory, which later merged with Becton Dickinson, as sales manager.
BUSINESS
March 20, 1997
Becton Dickinson & Co. announced yesterday that it will buy Difco Laboratories Inc., which will become part of Becton Dickinson Microbiology Systems, with headquarters in Sparks.According to company spokesmen, the transaction is unlikely to have any immediate impact on employment in Maryland. The company has about 1,700 employees in Sparks and in a facility in Hunt Valley.Becton Dickinson, with corporate headquarters in Franklin Lakes, N.J., makes medical supplies and equipment, with revenue for the year ending in September of $2.8 billion.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | August 8, 1995
You should know this about Robert Traub, professor emeritus, retired Army colonel and the nation's foremost flea expert:* He has the second-largest flea collection in the world, their tiny bodies packed in wooden cabinets that line the basement of his modest Bethesda home.* He served 30 years as the Smithsonian's honorary curator of fleas, until the position was abolished a year ago.* The centerpiece of his dining room window is a stained-glass image of a flea.The foot-long stained-glass flea, a gift from a friend, lacks many details of the flea's anatomy that Mr. Traub has been studying and writing about for the past 57 years, first for the Army, then as a professor of microbiology for what now is the University of Maryland Medical Center.
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