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NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | March 18, 1992
Washington. -- Please allow me to excuse myself from the pack journalism in which the media is fanning a Mickey Mouse House banking mess into what masquerades as a gigantic scandal.So public opinion has forced the House of Representatives to end, after more than 150 years, one of its most outrageous perks: check-writing privileges against money yet to come, plus protection against overdrafts. This ''bank'' was a ''co-op'' product of the arrogance under which House members still get free doctors, free parking, free exercise and health club facilities, reserved parking spaces at National Airport -- all privileges unavailable to ordinary citizens.
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NEWS
By Peter Jensen | November 7, 2009
To baby boomers, Mickey Mouse is the perpetually cheerful and wholesome host of the "Mickey Mouse Club." To senior citizens, he's the star of movies and shorts dating back to 1928. But to youngsters today, he's mostly a corporate icon - a shill for Walt Disney theme parks and DVDs and the familiar symbol on a gargantuan inventory of merchandise, from bed linens to pancake molds. This week's announcement that Disney plans to re-engineer the character into something edgier, more irascible, clever and heroic is no doubt disappointing to the older set. This is Mickey as some Bugs Bunny wannabe, without the Brooklyn accent.
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NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | June 7, 1994
Haymarket, Virginia. -- To this quiet Virginia land along Little Bull Run, between Manassas battlefield and Thoroughfare Gap, Walt Disney insists on bringing American history. The fact that history precious to all Americans already abounds in this green Piedmont, and would be destroyed if Disney's scheme goes through, is shrugged off in the billionaire company's hurry to seal the deal.The creators of Mickey Mouse say their ''Disney's America'' theme park here would cover only 400 of the 3,000 acres the company wants rezoned.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | August 30, 2009
John W. McGrain, former secretary of the Baltimore County Landmarks Preservation Committee and official county historian since 1998, was an 8-year-old living in Ashburton when the world veered toward war in 1939. Reflecting on those Depression years the other day, McGrain said that by the mid-1930s, "all kids knew about the approaching war." Bubble gum packages came with "war cards depicting the Japan-China War; families gathered around the Philco in the living room to listen to Hitler's rantings on the radio."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 26, 1994
If you have cable, there's a lot worth watching tonight. If you don't, there isn't.* "NCAA basketball tournament" (3:30 p.m.-conclusion, WBAL, Channel 11) -- When this afternoon's games are over, the NCAA will have 50 percent of its Final Four in place. CBS.* "Figure Skating World Championships" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Tonya Harding's plea bargain prevented her from competing in this contest. When network executives scheduled prime-time coverage of tonight's women's finals, undoubtedly the visions of post-Olympics glory, or ratings, danced in their heads.
NEWS
By NATALIE HARVEY | January 17, 1995
Good news and Mickey Mouse, what a wonderful combination. Bell Atlantic has made a Mickey Mouse telephone available for students' good news at Stevens Forest Elementary School, Oakland Mills Village.Parents were asked to list names and local telephone numbers their children are allowed to call. Then, when the occasion arises to share news with someone, the student calls on the Mickey phone. Bell, the school's business partner, provided the phone so students could talk about a successful test, a completed project or happy event.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | July 15, 1994
THE SECOND battle of Manassas is now being waged between Walt Disney and Civil War buffs of Virginia. The Disney corporation wants to build a giant theme park devoted to American history. The historians want the Disney people to take their Mickey Mouse ideas somewhere else.If Disney can't get permission to build its park on hallowed Manassas ground, Joe Skalet has a suggestion."The company should move the park to Washington, which has been called Disney World North for some time now," he told me."
FEATURES
By Linda Shrieves and Linda Shrieves,Orlando Sentinel | August 10, 1992
Ours may be a small world, but it apparently is chock-full of items bearing the unmistakable print of Mickey Mouse.Ever since Walt Disney World in Orlando, Fla., bought a Holstein cow with a silhouette of Mickey Mouse's head on her side, the mailbags have been packed with Mickey sightings."
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1994
An hour after carrying his No. 2 pencil and yellow legal pad into the Severna Park Library last night, Chris Latimer, 6, had filled every page with drawings of Mickey Mouse, dinosaurs and elephants.Chris was one of about 300 first- through sixth-graders at the library who learned from Baltimore cartoonist and illustrator Jim Sizemore how to create cartoon animals using simple shapes."It was pretty interesting to see how even people like me can make cartoon characters using squares and circles," Chris said, as he looked admiringly at his Mickey Mouse drawing.
NEWS
By BONITA FORMWALT | May 11, 1994
She found me seated on the floor, surrounded by damp beach towels, AAA Triptiks and 23 rolls of undeveloped film. I was wearing a stuffed Goofy hat, complete with long ears that grazed my sunburned shoulders.A nine-day trip to Florida had come to an end."How was the wedding?" she asked, gingerly sidestepping the oranges scattered around the room.Wedding? For a moment I was confused."Surely you remember. Disney World, then on to St. Petersburg for your brother's wedding."The memory of a lavish production with dozens of extras and lots of white came to mind.
NEWS
August 18, 2009
VIRGINIA DAVIS, 90 Walt Disney's first star Virginia Davis, who appeared in Walt Disney's pioneering "Alice" films, has died at age 90. The Walt Disney Co. said Ms. Davis died at her home Saturday in Corona, Calif., of natural causes. Ms. Davis was hired by Disney in 1923 when he was a struggling filmmaker in Kansas City, Mo., and later worked with him in Hollywood. She was the first of several girls to have the title role in the series of "Alice" comedies that ran from 1923 to 1927.
SPORTS
By Mark Wogenrich and Mark Wogenrich,Tribune Newspapers | July 13, 2009
BETHLEHEM, Pa. -- Mickey Mouse was listening to Eminem on her iPod as she warmed up on the practice putting green Sunday morning. Candie Kung walked by and made note of the familiar scene. "Did you sleep here last night?" Kung asked. Eun Hee Ji (known to fellow South Korean players as Mickey Mouse) said, no, she didn't spend that much time on the green, but seemed to always run into Kung for some reason. Kung was at the practice green again later, waiting as Ji made the definitive putt of the women's golf season.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | May 24, 2009
The legend goes that when Walt Disney looked for a distributor for his Mickey Mouse cartoons, mogul Louis B. Mayer reacted with horror at the amiable rodent. How could you turn a mouse into a comic hero? Pregnant housewives would stare at the creature on the screen and miscarry right in the theater, Mayer predicted. Of course, Mickey eventually became the mascot and mainstay of Disney's own studio. So it's poetic justice that the art of upsetting conventional wisdom with original ideas has fallen to Disney's heir, John Lasseter, the creative chief of Pixar and the head of Disney animation.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | May 6, 2008
Dawn Shipley and her boyfriend waited until midnight Friday and then left their West Baltimore house. The couple was eager, her family said, to withdraw money from an ATM because Shipley's boyfriend's welfare check had just cleared. He took out the money, and she went to a bar and bought some cigarettes and maybe some beer, according to family members. About an hour later, about 1 a.m. Saturday, somebody shot and killed Shipley. She fell to the ground, bleeding on the sidewalk of the 500 block of Brunswick St. It is just blocks away from her home.
FEATURES
By TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | December 11, 2007
WITH THE exception of reigning sovereigns (including the pope), presidents and cardinals, introductions made between strangers abide by these rules: Youth is introduced to age - `Strom Thurmond, may I present Doogie Howser?' Men are introduced to women - `Dame Edna, this is Count Victor Grezhinski.' Lower ranks are introduced to higher - `Colonel Sanders, this is Sgt. Bilko.' Individuals are introduced to groups - `Mickey Mouse Club, this is Britney Spears.'" Such tongue-in-cheek witty info is from the new and delightful Schott's Miscellany almanac for 2008, by Ben Schott.
NEWS
By MONTY COOK and MONTY COOK,SUN REPORTER | February 19, 2006
THE WORLD COULD HAVE BEEN HIS. International fame. Academy Awards. Theme parks. Television shows. His face on watches. His ears on hats instead of those of that ... that ... mouse. If not for a little underhanded dealing and a lot of gamesmanship nearly 80 years ago, Oswald the Lucky Rabbit could have supplanted Mickey Mouse as a true American icon. Instead, Oswald became a background character in animation history until this month, when the Walt Disney Co. reacquired the rights to Walt Disney's first animated character from NBC Universal, which had held the exclusive rights since 1927.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | November 24, 1993
TC The six plain gold frames, each containing a foot-square piece of paper divided into six small panels of pencil sketches, were lifted from their display easels in a Timonium office and wrapped as tenderly as artwork by Leonardo or Michelangelo.The recently discovered drawings by Ub Iwerks are in their own way just as rare and valuable as old masters -- Lloyds of London has insured them for $3 million.Ub Iwerks?He isn't exactly a household name, but his subject is, for these are the earliest known representations of the world's most famous rodent, Mickey Mouse, who turns 65 this year.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | February 10, 2006
You silly rabbit, Michaels is for NBC. Al Michaels officially made his move yesterday, when NBC announced he would become the play-by-play voice of the network's new Sunday night NFL package this fall. But after Michaels initially had committed to continue on Monday Night Football as it moved from ABC to ESPN, the all-sports network and the Walt Disney Co. didn't just let him walk away from his contract. No, they kicked some tail. Some cottontail. As part of the deal releasing Michaels, ESPN received: Rights to Friday coverage - for which it paid - of the next four of golf's Ryder Cups, along with extended highlights.
NEWS
By SARAH ABRUZZESE and SARAH ABRUZZESE,SUN REPORTER | October 24, 2005
There will soon be a new intersection of sports and pop culture in Baltimore. Yellow Kid, Batman and Mickey Mouse will be there, along with all their cartoon friends, because comic entrepreneur Steve Geppi is finally building his museum. For years, people have told Geppi to expand his Diamond International Galleries of pop culture, replete with historic cartoon art, so that everyone could enjoy the characters America grew up with. Geppi, a part-owner of the Orioles and publisher of Baltimore magazine, decided that now was a good time.
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