Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMickey Mantle
IN THE NEWS

Mickey Mantle

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 9, 1995
There's a classic photograph from the late 1950s of Mickey Mantle on a cabin cruiser with a few other New York Yankee buddies off the coast of Florida during spring training. The players wore crew cuts as severe as a Marine's and the kind of tank top undershirts that men wore when all men wore undershirts. Cigarettes dangled from lips. Meaty hands grippedlong-neck beers. And every subject in that shot wore something else on his face: a macho swagger.This was post-war America. They were the Yankees.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2013
June 7, 2001: At the White House, President George W. Bush greets the NFL champion Ravens, who present him with an autographed football and a personalized jersey. "It was cool, man," defensive tackle Tony Siragusa says. "[But] I was depressed that they didn't have the buffet ready. " June 2, 1983: At his first news conference of the year - a rambling, ominous discourse - Colts owner Robert Irsay promises that the team will remain in Baltimore "unless you throw us out. I could pull up 30 vans and be out of here Sunday ... but I haven't done it. " June 7, 1977: Harold Baines, 18, a hard-hitting outfielder from St. Michaels, goes to the Chicago White Sox as the first player taken in baseball's free-agent draft.
Advertisement
NEWS
By CARL M. CANNON | August 20, 1995
Washington -- I love baseball, and like all true fans, I mourned the passing last week of Mickey Mantle, the great Yankee center fielder. But I found something missing in the nation's reaction to Mantle's death. It almost seemed as if I were in one of those futuristic Hollywood thrillers in which a time traveler makes some alteration in the environment -- and changes the future.Amid the odes-to-the-Mick and laments of Lost Innocence by the bow-tied, baseball-is-Americana crowd, I kept listening for two lyrical words that would reassure me that I was in the real world, that the nation's past had not somehow been altered.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
Against anyone else, it would have seemed preposterous when the 12-year-old boy's hand reached into the field of play to change the course of the Orioles' 1996 playoff run. Against the New York Yankees? Jeffrey Maier was just another chapter in a long story. The Yankees have almost always been the measuring stick for their divisional rivals 200 miles down Interstate 95. And pardon Orioles fans if they've always felt the game was a little bit rigged, whether by baseball economics or by the dark magic of an adolescent fan. The Bronx Bombers of Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris were still the big boys on the block when the Orioles first got good in the early 1960s.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1996
As a genuine American sports legend, Mickey Mantle was always accorded star treatment. When cops realized whom they had just pulled over for drunk driving, they inevitably closed their ticket books and drove the Yankee slugger home. When he drunkenly barreled his car into a telephone pole, nearly decapitating his wife Merlyn, the whole affair was hushed up. Not a word made the papers.But now, a little more than a year after Mantle's death, a new book has been published that lays bare Mantle's shortcomings, which seem every bit as titanic as his tape measure home runs.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | August 18, 1995
Before America gets carried away with creating its own distorted perception of Mickey Mantle, now that he's in his grave, an effort should be made to correct false impressions. It's terribly unfair -- also inaccurate -- to say he was a drunk. A %J drinker, yes. But there is a difference.Mickey Mantle never lost personal dignity or his status. And he always insisted, when asked if he played under the influence or with a hangover from the night before, that he never hurt the team. If you believe otherwise you've been misled, misinformed.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 16, 1995
Mickey Mantle, an alcohol abuser, lived ten years longer than Jerry Garcia, a heroin abuser. So there.Japan's prime minister has apologized for his country's torturing, maiming, colonizing and enslaving its neighbors, 50 years after the practices stopped. Germany's president said something comparable after only 40 years.
SPORTS
By George Vecsey and George Vecsey,New York Times News Service | August 16, 1995
DALLAS -- Mickey Mantle always said he wanted to be remembered as a good teammate, but loyalty works both ways. Mickey Mantle might best be remembered -- and even judged in some earthly way -- by the awe and the respect of the teammates who stood with him yesterday.Some of the teammates at his funeral service had never met Mickey Mantle. They were fans who had gaped at his long blasts or chuckled at a story he told on television. Others had met him once, and they all treasured that fleeting moment yesterday.
NEWS
August 16, 1995
In Mickey Mantle's final weeks, there was ample hand-wringing over his long abuse of alcohol and rapid selection for a replacement liver. But upon his passing at age 63 in Dallas early last Sunday, there was no equivocation."
SPORTS
August 18, 1995
DALLAS -- The family of Mickey Mantle yesterday carried out his last wish, unveiling a new "organ donor" trading card with the baseball great's picture and autograph that will be passed out at major-league stadiums."
SPORTS
By Ben Bolch and Kevin Van Valkenburg, Tribune Newspapers | July 4, 2011
He is Mr. November, and every other month in which Major League Baseball is played. He has more hits than Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, a higher career batting average than Mickey Mantle and a higher postseason average than Joe DiMaggio. And it won't be long before Derek Jeter is a new lord of New York Yankees lore. With six more hits, the shortstop will become the first player to collect 3,000 hits while playing exclusively with the most storied franchise in baseball. He resumed his pursuit Monday against the Cleveland Indians after spending the last three weeks on the disabled list with a strained right calf.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE and RICK MAESE,rick.maese@baltsun.com | November 30, 2008
As the years had passed, they had all scattered to some degree. They owned restaurants, they ran companies and small businesses, they sold products, marketed products, produced products, and one in particular - whom Calvert Hall's class of 1992 will never forget - served as a paramedic for the state police. But there they were, drawn together by unexpected phone calls, jarring e-mails and news reports that just didn't make sense. Did you hear? They were coming home from vacations. Enjoying the weekend.
SPORTS
June 18, 2006
A scout's take On Hanley Ramirez, Florida's 22-year-old rookie shortstop, who is batting .273 with 19 steals and 50 runs scored Defense -- He's got quickness, great instincts with his feet and hands and has a plus arm. He's just instinctive. He gets great jumps and has tremendous range and arm strength. He'll be in the top class of shortstops. He'll be in the discussion as one of the game's best shortstops in the next two or three years. Attitude -- He was a little maligned in his makeup with the Red Sox, but this is a great, great kid. He has a great work ethic, has fun playing and is a great teammate.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | April 15, 2002
BEFORE WE GET to this business of a ballplayer's chewed bubble gum fetching thousands of dollars in an online auction, a word about baseball memorabilia from a simpler time. One day, when I was a young boy living in southern New York, my uncle took me to a game at Yankee Stadium. As we walked near the players' entrance a few hours before the game, I spotted the great Mickey Mantle and asked him for an autograph. At first, Mantle looked at me the way you'd look at a fingernail in your soup.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2001
In 1968, his final year in baseball, an enveloping warmth greeted Mickey Mantle in all the ballparks he visited. As he hobbled to the plate on legs whose resemblance to tree trunks belied a notorious fragility, fans rose to their feet as though choreographed. I remember the singular absence of cheers or chants on those occasions. Just the sound of thousands of pairs of hands clapping. It gave me chills. The Yankees were uncharacteristically toothless in those days, which did nothing to diminish a lusty hostility toward the pinstripes that prevailed across the land.
NEWS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1999
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- New York Yankees legend Joe DiMaggio, whose classic swing and classy persona made him one of the most revered sports figures of the 20th century, died early yesterday after a five-month battle with lung cancer. He was 84.Mr. DiMaggio passed away at his Hollywood, Fla., home from complications after the removal of a cancerous tumor from his lung last October. His funeral will be Thursday in Northern California, with burial in the San Francisco area, where he grew up and began his professional baseball career.
SPORTS
By Dave Anderson and Dave Anderson,New York Times News Service | June 8, 1995
NEW YORK -- As soon as you walked in the door on Central Park South, a framed Yankees uniform with the "7" on the back told you where you were. And if you were lucky that lunch hour or dinner time, down past the big rectangular bar the color of baseball bats, in the last booth on the right, Mickey Mantle would be sitting with a drink."
NEWS
By John Steadman and John Steadman,Sun Staff | January 7, 1996
"The Last Hero: The Life of Mickey Mantle," by David Falkner. Illustrated. Simon & Schuster. 255 pages. $24There's no attempt to alter the reputation or rework the imagof Mickey Mantle, who, like the line in one of those country and western ballads he so much enjoyed and sometimes personified, "lived fast, loved hard, died young and left a beautiful memory." jTC The latest book about him, in the lexicon of a game he once dominated with such natural effusion, is an absolute Grand Slam winner.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | September 5, 1998
There were a couple of days last week when "Fat Jack's" place in Easton, Pa., more closely resembled the legendary TV bar "Cheers" than just another sports hangout in small-town America.Thrust into the role of Sam Malone, as portrayed by Ted Danson so ably on the tube, was the owner of the establishment, Jack Fisher.First, ESPN's cameras were there reminiscing about the last days of Roger Maris' charge to supplant Babe Ruth as the all-time, one-season home run king, and Fisher played a significant role.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 6, 1997
With the sun spreading its vast Technicolor glow along York Road, and with thousands streaming into the Towsontown Festival, and with the music of their laughter filling the weekend air, this kid was spotted outside the Towson Library. Immediately, he made you want to cancel spring and issue a factory recall for winter.He was maybe 14 years old and wore a black T-shirt and a smirk. The T-shirt said "Nazi Punk." The smirk said: I am a geek who thinks this is cool, and I have no idea what I am doing.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.