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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | February 7, 1993
Rock stardom may not offer much in the way of rules of conduct, but there are some things we just don't expect our pop idols to do. We don't, for example, expect to see them hanging out with anything less than glamorous young supermodels. Nor do we expect them to set up their amps or tune their guitars; that's what the roadies do. And when it comes time to do phone interviews, we definitely don't expect them to do the dialing themselves.So when the phone rang at the appointed hour one afternoon in January, what I expected was some handler telling me to "hold please, for Mr. Jagger."
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | October 22, 2007
Jerry Hall, the tall, terrific bombshell who grew up in one of my own Texas hometowns (Gonzales, population 5,000) is getting a rumored $2 million advance to write her life story for HarperCollins. And we all know that the fact this dynamo was married to Mick Jagger and had four children with him between 1990 and 1999 is partly the reason for this magnificent money and interest. Jerry has remained on the periphery of the newsworthy Rolling Stones for years. She is 51 years old now, and Mick is 64. It took Mick's fathering a child by Brazilian model Luciana Morad in 1999 to force Jerry to the divorce court.
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By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1997
In 1977, Mick Jagger first sang, "Start me up, I'll never stop."Now, at 54, as the Rolling Stones begin their "Bridges to Babylon" tour, the legendary rocker has proved that phrase was more than a lyric. It's a way of life."He's lean, he's athletic, he's out there running around like a 16-year-old," says Greg Isaacs, corporate fitness director for Warner Bros. and personal trainer for celebrities including Melanie Griffith and Goldie Hawn. "I doubt he eats cheeseburgers every day."Other aging acts, such as the Eagles and Fleetwood Mac, have hit the road lately as well.
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By MARYANN JAMES | September 15, 2007
When it comes to relationships, you just can't win. And that's a good thing even if it doesn't seem like it during the heat of battle. Of course, I'm competitive. When I was a kid, you could lose an eye if you interrupted me during a game of Hungry Hungry Hippos. But when it comes to disagreements with your boo, it seems you've gotta check your inner child (and your ego) at the door. "Folks tend to get invested in winning," Virginia-based dating coach Toni Coleman says of disagreement between couples.
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By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN COLUMNIST | March 9, 1999
WASHINGTON -- I saw Mick Jagger shoot across the stage like a lick of hellfire, strutting and belting out these blues-fueled rock anthems the way no one ever has or ever will again.I saw Keith Richards, looking like he just climbed off a slab at the morgue, play the guitar as if it were alive in his hands. I saw Ron Wood vamp and Charlie Watts pound the drums with his trademark odd detachment, like a man who had originally planned to go to the cleaners, but somehow found himself here amid the swirling madness.
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By Dan DeLuca and Dan DeLuca,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 24, 2001
At least Driving Rain, Paul McCartney's first album of new songs in four years, has a reason for being. The ex-Beatle, 59, lost his wife, Linda, to cancer in 1998, and earlier this year he got engaged to former fashion model Heather Mills. Theoretically, at least, McCartney has something to sing about. That is more than can be said for Mick Jagger. Goddess in the Doorway, the Rolling Stones mouthpiece's fourth solo album, released Tuesday, exists because - well, because the Stones aren't doing anything just now (though there's talk of a 40th-anniversary tour next year)
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By Knight-Ridder News Service | February 18, 1992
Mick Jagger -- after a day's restriction at Tokyo's Narita Airport -- yesterday was granted a two-week "special permission" to promote the movie "Freejack" in the country. He was detained because of a 1969 London arrest for marijuana possession.
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By Lou Cedrone | January 16, 1992
* ''FreeJack'' A futuristic thriller in which a race-car driver finds himself living in the future. Emilio Estevez, Mick Jagger and Anthony Hopkins star.* ''Grand Canyon'' The stressful, contemporary life as it is lived by a group of people in Los Angeles. Kevin Kline, Danny Glover and Steve Martin star.* ''Juice'' A coming of age on the streets of Harlem.
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | June 10, 1993
It used to be that writing an unauthorized biography was fairl easy work, requiring little more than a box of press clippings and access to a few ex-toadies eager to dish the dirt on their former employer. Just add hype and stir: instant bio.Today's scandal-mongers need something more, though. They need an angle -- something juicy enough to get mentioned by the gossip columnists, and nasty enough to titillate even the most jaded fan.Finding that angle can be a real challenge when the subject of your sleaze-ography is someone as notorious as Rolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger.
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By Kevin Cowherd | March 8, 1993
Very often at parties, when it's growing late and people are becoming cranky and bored, I'll be asked to tell the story about me and Mick Jagger."Oh, no one wants to hear that old . . . " I'll start to say, but then three people with glazed eyes and onion dip crusted on their chins will shout: "Oh, c'mon! Tell us!"Since there's nothing worse than being pestered by a bunch of drunks, I usually end up telling the story, just to have some peace and quiet.The thing is, I've met lots of famous people, but all anyone wants to talk about is Mick Jagger, Mick Jagger, Mick Jagger.
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By Greg Kot and Greg Kot,Chicago Tribune | December 26, 2006
James Brown was more than a soul-music giant. He was a visionary. The world dances today to the sound of his drum, and in James Brown's universe every instrument was a drum. Mr. Brown died yesterday at 73 of heart failure in Atlanta after being taken to Emory Crawford Long Hospital with pneumonia. Whereas legendary peers such as the Beatles, Elvis Presley and even Bob Dylan have been transformed from counterculture rebels into cuddly icons, Mr. Brown leaves a pricklier legacy. "Said to be singularly `raw,' `uninhibited,' `possessed,' he became the mysterious, exotic black Other of colonialist fantasy," wrote Bruce Tucker in his introduction to the singer's autobiography, James Brown: The Godfather of Soul.
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By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
Pity the conservative rock fan. So many musicians are ganging up on the president. Bruce Springsteen is on tour playing protest songs. The Dixie Chicks just put out a new album with a song - "Not Ready to Make Nice" - that finds them standing firm against President Bush. And Mick Jagger released a song last year that called the president a hypocrite. But to prove that there is still some music out there for conservative rockers, National Review has published a list of the 50 greatest conservative rock songs.
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By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | April 2, 2006
WHEN GRACE HARTIGAN WAS A LITTLE girl, she was bewitched by gypsies. In the 1930s, the Travelers still roamed the countryside in nomadic caravans, and young Grace would shinny up the apple tree in her parents' backyard in Newark, N.J., to spy on them. She spent hours watching the women in colorful skirts and big hoop earrings telling fortunes, the men sharpening their knives. GRACE HARTIGAN: PORTRAITS FROM THE MASTERS, NEW PAINTINGS / / Exhibit runs through April 29 / / C. Grimaldis Gallery, 523 N. Charles St. / / Admission is free / / Call 410-539-1080 or visit cgrimaldisgallery.
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By PETER SCHMUCK | February 3, 2006
Detroit -- Mick Jagger is, I think, 14 years older than I am, yet he is a symbol of enduring youth and I'm trying to figure out why AARP keeps sending me those Medicare supplement brochures. Doesn't seem fair. I was a little kid when the Rolling Stones went on The Ed Sullivan Show and were asked to tone down their racy hit "Let's Spend the Night Together" for a 1960s national television audience, but they're still rocking and I'm barely still walking. Maybe they made a deal with the devil - perhaps a little sympathy in exchange for a slower aging process, though Keith Richards must have been out of the room at the time.
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By Robert Benjamin | August 27, 2005
`THE WORLD'S Greatest Rock and Roll Band" - now of course the world's oldest rock and roll band - kicked off its latest world tour last weekend to excited reviews. The concert, quite fittingly, was at Boston's peculiarly angled, much storied Fenway Park, the oldest ballpark in the majors. The same weekend, another fabled avatar of the 1960s - the "gonzo" writer Hunter S. Thompson, who fatally shot himself six months ago - was memorialized in a Hollywood-produced fireworks extravaganza in the mountains of Colorado that culminated in his ashes being blasted into the night sky before an exclusive, invitation-only crowd.
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June 17, 2005
Dean S. Shingler, a retired electrical engineer and sports and muscle car enthusiast, died in his sleep June 10 at his Ellicott City home. He was 86. Mr. Shingler was born and raised in Bowesmont, N.D. After earning a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering in 1941 from the University of North Dakota, he moved to Baltimore for a job with Westinghouse Electric Corp. He retired in 1983. Mr. Shingler enjoyed driving Corvettes and Chevrolet Camaros, and attending rock 'n' roll concerts.
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June 17, 2005
Dean S. Shingler, a retired electrical engineer and sports and muscle car enthusiast, died in his sleep June 10 at his Ellicott City home. He was 86. Mr. Shingler was born and raised in Bowesmont, N.D. After earning a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering in 1941 from the University of North Dakota, he moved to Baltimore for a job with Westinghouse Electric Corp. He retired in 1983. Mr. Shingler enjoyed driving Corvettes and Chevrolet Camaros, and attending rock 'n' roll concerts.
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By Andrew Leckey | May 22, 2005
Mick Jagger at age 62 will kick off his latest Rolling Stones tour in August for several reasons. He still enjoys it, it shows he still has it and he believes in the legacy of his music. All true, but most of all, he's doing it for the money. He has lots of people to support in his senior years. Few folks Mick's age have a multimillion-dollar tour to fall back on. That's why people of all ages should train now for getting old. Too many Americans consider their golden years a vague, almost mystical time when their worries will dissipate.
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By Andrew Leckey | May 22, 2005
Mick Jagger at age 62 will kick off his latest Rolling Stones tour in August for several reasons. He still enjoys it, it shows he still has it and he believes in the legacy of his music. All true, but most of all, he's doing it for the money. He has lots of people to support in his senior years. Few folks Mick's age have a multimillion-dollar tour to fall back on. That's why people of all ages should train now for getting old. Too many Americans consider their golden years a vague, almost mystical time when their worries will dissipate.
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By Dan DeLuca and Dan DeLuca,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 24, 2001
At least Driving Rain, Paul McCartney's first album of new songs in four years, has a reason for being. The ex-Beatle, 59, lost his wife, Linda, to cancer in 1998, and earlier this year he got engaged to former fashion model Heather Mills. Theoretically, at least, McCartney has something to sing about. That is more than can be said for Mick Jagger. Goddess in the Doorway, the Rolling Stones mouthpiece's fourth solo album, released Tuesday, exists because - well, because the Stones aren't doing anything just now (though there's talk of a 40th-anniversary tour next year)
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