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By Alec MacGillis and By Alec MacGillis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 26, 2001
WATERFORD TOWNSHIP, Mich. - Ian Kinder teaches his firearms class at a sporting goods store in a Detroit suburb, with a stuffed bear head mounted on the wall above him and camouflage jackets hanging on nearby racks. But Kinder's instructions have nothing to do with hunting or wildlife. The potential targets of his students' skills are strictly human. "You need to ask yourself: Are you capable of using lethal force?" Kinder asked his class of 10 men and one woman last week. "Putting a bullet into someone is an activity that's going to change your life forever."
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NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and By Alec MacGillis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 26, 2001
WATERFORD TOWNSHIP, Mich. - Ian Kinder teaches his firearms class at a sporting goods store in a Detroit suburb, with a stuffed bear head mounted on the wall above him and camouflage jackets hanging on nearby racks. But Kinder's instructions have nothing to do with hunting or wildlife. The potential targets of his students' skills are strictly human. "You need to ask yourself: Are you capable of using lethal force?" Kinder asked his class of 10 men and one woman last week. "Putting a bullet into someone is an activity that's going to change your life forever."
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NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 27, 2006
I'm willing to compete with Minesweeper, but not with the entire Internet." - DON HERZOG, University of Michigan law professor, who initiated the faculty discussion that led to a ban on student access to the Internet during their scheduled class times.
NEWS
By Timothy E. Quill | September 28, 1993
AS Dr. Jack Kevorkian faces trial -- and another hearing this week -- on a charge of breaking Michigan's law against physician-assisted suicide, one might ask what should really be on trial: Dr. Kevorkian, the law or our treatment of dying patients?The disturbing background of this case has been chronicled extensively in the media -- 16 desperate people directly assisted in suicide by Dr. Kevorkian, a pathologist with no clinical training; a law specifically enacted to control him, then blatantly violated when he continued his chilling crusade by openly helping two more people to die.Dr.
NEWS
May 26, 2002
RIGHT NOW, because of conflicting federal appeals court decisions, race is both a legal and illegal consideration for admission to America's colleges and universities. It all depends on where you live. Of course, that won't do. And so the Supreme Court -- which hasn't said much about race-conscious admissions policies since 1978 -- must revisit the issue next term. The nation needs a clear and consistent opinion on this issue, and this time it should be one that more adequately sets parameters.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Daily News | July 5, 1991
SHOULD ONE feel sorry for the person who, having gotten caught with a sizable load of dangerous drugs, draws a life sentence without parole? Isn't this cruel and unusual punishment? The Supreme Court recently answered the latter question by ruling such sentences constitutional.In the case before the court, defendant Ronald A. Harmelin was found in possession of 672.5 grams of cocaine -- about 1 1/2 pounds -- and sentenced to life without parole under a Michigan law. The court rejected the argument that possession of large amounts of drugs is not on a par with the crimes of violence that usually rate life sentences.
NEWS
April 2, 2010
I'm surprised that Loyola professor Thomas DiLorenzo is still writing about how the 1977 Community Reinvestment Act contributed to the"sub-prime" mortagage crisis when a simple Google search shows that idea has been repeatedly debunked ("Writers don't understand how markets work," Readers respond, March 31). The Community Reinvestment Act requires banks to lend in the low-income neighborhoods where they take deposits. It does not require banks to make bad loans. Furthermore, University of Michigan law professor Michael Barr testified before the House Committee on Financial Services that 50 percent of subprime loans were made by mortgage service companies not subject to comprehensive federal supervision, and another 30 percent were made by affiliates of banks or thrifts that are not subject to routine supervision or examinations.
NEWS
By Steven Lubet | June 25, 2003
SUPPORTERS OF affirmative action are cheering the Supreme Court's set of decisions in two cases from the University of Michigan on Monday that seem to endorse the limited use of racial preferences in university admissions. Unfortunately, the practical result may be nearly the opposite as the court's ruling contains a virtual road map for years of continuing litigation in which many affirmative action programs are very likely to lose. In Grutter vs. Bollinger, the court approved the University of Michigan law school's "holistic" use of racial preferences because they guaranteed each applicant a "highly individualized" review.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | January 16, 1994
WASHINGTON -- It has bumper-sticker simplicity and powerful political appeal: "Three strikes, and you're out!" Put another way, the idea is still simple: "Turn career criminals into career inmates."In an era of rising fear of crime, politicians across the country are seizing on a get-tough suggestion that may well become a law in many states: A conviction for a third violent crime leads to life in prison, with no chance of being freed on parole.The suggestion has gained popularity swiftly across the country since Washington state voters strongly approved it in an initiative election last fall.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 15, 1993
REDFORD TOWNSHIP, Mich. -- Dr. Jack Kevorkian was charged yesterday for a second time with violating Michigan's new law against assisting in a suicide, but he stayed out of jail when a judge refused to set an unusually steep bond.The Wayne County prosecutor, John D. O'Hair, charged Dr. Kevorkian with assisting in the suicide Thursday of Donald O'Keefe, 73, of the Detroit suburb of Redford Township. Mr. O'Keefe's death came only hours after Dr. Kevorkian, a retired pathologist, was ordered to stand trial for aiding in the Aug. 4 suicide of Thomas W. Hyde Jr., 30, in Detroit.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Staff Writer | September 9, 1993
Assisting in a suicide would become a crime in Maryland under legislation being proposed by Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr.In a 15-page opinion released yesterday, Mr. Curran urged state lawmakers to act on the issue promptly to pre-empt the type of legal questions raised in Michigan over the activities of "suicide doctor" Jack Kevorkian.Mr. Curran said that he was not aware of similar physician-assisted suicides occurring in Maryland but noted that the state is one of only 20 that does not outlaw it.Maryland law is unclear on the subject, he said.
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