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Michelle Kwan

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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2005
PORTLAND, Ore. - Before she has even put blades to ice at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships, everyone is already asking Michelle Kwan whether she'll compete in the Winter Olympics next year. "I do think about the Olympics, but I'm taking one thing at a time, nationals hopefully to worlds and then go on from there," said America's most decorated figure skater and reigning U.S. champion. Kwan, 24, has been largely absent from competition the past two years, bypassing the Grand Prix series and performing only in two world championships, two national championships and as a last-minute substitution in the 2002 edition of Skate America.
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By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Reporter | March 22, 2008
GOTHENBURG, SWEDEN -- After a season that started with a win, bottomed out in January and regained some altitude with a seventh-place finish at the World Figure Skating Championships this week, what does Kimmie Meissner do now? For one, the figure skater from Bel Air has to settle on a coach. The obvious choice is Richard Callaghan, the man who rebuilt Meissner's confidence and performance level to something resembling her former self. Meissner has indicated she would enjoy that relationship, and Callaghan, who has guided skaters to Olympic, world and national titles, appears as though he would like to go to the Olympics again.
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SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 1, 1998
In the old days, the deal was simpler. Once every four years, an unknown in a tutu would skate right into America's heart. She would wave around a gold medal, smile a lot, and then enter a world of professional ice shows, Christmas television specials and hair care commercials.Well, it's sure not that way anymore.This is the age of made-for-television skating wars, endorsement contracts and book deals. It's the era in which teen-aged stars are transformed into millionaires, where an athlete's every bobble, injury and slump is picked over by media, fans, television executives and agents.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | August 24, 2007
With a new season on the horizon, U.S. figure skating champion Kimmie Meissner is channeling her inner Michelle Kwan. Her short program music, "The Feeling Begins," is what Kwan used on her way to national and world titles. The footwork, spins and spirals that interpret the music are the work of Lori Nichol, who choreographed Kwan's moves for six years. And Meissner spent two weeks in July under the tutelage of Frank Carroll, perhaps the most famous U.S. coach and Kwan's mentor for a number of years.
SPORTS
February 14, 2006
Did Michelle Kwan give up too soon on skating in Turin? I think it was unfair and selfish of her to go in the first place. After all, she didn't earn it - she was grandfathered in. She took up a slot she shouldn't have. Ego became ME-GO. Steve Childers Aberdeen No, absolutely not. These athletes know their bodies and can readily determine if they are physically able to perform at a top level. What Kwan did was very honorable and selfless. Patrick R. Lynch Parkville For all of the hard work that spanned over four years, Michelle Kwan quit too soon.
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 2004
NEW YORK - North Baltimore Aquatic Club swimming star Michael Phelps has added the American International Trophy to his portfolio of major honors, outpolling an array of global sports celebrities. Phelps was announced yesterday as the 24th winner of the award, formerly known as the Jesse Owens International Trophy, honoring the top athlete of 2003 in world sports. In voting by experts representing each continent, Phelps earned 64 points. Trailing him were Tour de France cycling champion Lance Armstrong (59)
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Reporter | March 22, 2008
GOTHENBURG, SWEDEN -- After a season that started with a win, bottomed out in January and regained some altitude with a seventh-place finish at the World Figure Skating Championships this week, what does Kimmie Meissner do now? For one, the figure skater from Bel Air has to settle on a coach. The obvious choice is Richard Callaghan, the man who rebuilt Meissner's confidence and performance level to something resembling her former self. Meissner has indicated she would enjoy that relationship, and Callaghan, who has guided skaters to Olympic, world and national titles, appears as though he would like to go to the Olympics again.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 23, 1997
With her winning history and a nagging foot injury, Michelle Kwan could easily skip next month's U.S. Figure Skating championships and receive a free pass to the 1998 Winter Olympics.But that's not her style.Kwan announced yesterday that she plans to compete at the nationals in Philadelphia, despite a stress fracture of her left foot."This is the Olympic year, and I want to get the full taste of it," Kwan said. "I don't want to go straight to the Olympics. I want to earn it."Even if she falters in Philadelphia, Kwan is all but certain to go to the Olympics, where she will be favored for the gold in women's singles.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2002
SALT LAKE CITY - Eight years ago, Michelle Kwan was a quiet, shy 13-year-old who barely got asked a question in her first Olympic news conference. For whatever reason, all anyone wanted to talk about was two women named Tonya and Nancy. About 10,000 questions and 800 news conferences later, all anyone wants to talk about is Michelle Kwan. Intelligent and well-spoken, Kwan remains one of the few figure skaters still able to maintain a sense of normalcy in a sport so often dominated by the absurd.
NEWS
April 25, 1997
ICE SKATING is enjoying unprecedented popularity throughout America. Developers in the Baltimore region are responding by erecting an precedented number of new indoor rinks. In an area where ice time was so scare not long ago that hockey leagues routinely scheduled games and practices after midnight and figure skaters were perfecting double toe loops before the sun rose, this building spree is putting smiles on the faces of serious and casual skaters.Baltimore County's approval this month of a $5.3 million project in the Fullerton area, planned to include two National Hockey League-sized rinks, is the most recent manifestation of this boom.
SPORTS
By JOHN POWERS and JOHN POWERS,THE BOSTON GLOBE | December 12, 2006
It's two weeks before Christmas and Sasha Cohen is nearly mistletoed out. "I feel like Santa Claus this season," America's greatest skating actress says. "I've been opening all the rinks." Whenever a monster evergreen has been lit, from New York to Dallas to San Diego, Cohen has been there, laced-up and luminous. Since the Olympics, she has been everywhere, it seems - partying at the Oscars and the Emmys, touring Japan, throwing out the first pitch at an Arizona Diamondbacks game, celebrity-styling for Modern Bride, making commercials, TV episodes, movies.
NEWS
By RICK MAESE and RICK MAESE,SUN REPORTER | March 26, 2006
CALGARY, Alberta -- Her smile stretched from one end of the rink to the other, and hundreds of young girls excitedly shrieked her name: "Kimmie! Kimmie!" The screams bounced off the rafters. Bel Air's ice princess, 16-year-old figure skater Kimmie Meissner, took her place atop a new throne yesterday. With a flawless performance in the long program, Meissner captured first place at the World Figure Skating Championships, sending shock waves across the skating community and surprising even the young skater.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE and RICK MAESE,SUN REPORTER | March 25, 2006
CALGARY, Alberta -- When Kimmie Meissner returned home from the Olympics a month ago, her right eardrum had ruptured. It bled, and she could barely hear out of it. "[My coach] always said I had selective hearing," Meissner said. It's easy to joke now. Her ear is fine and the 16-year-old Bel Air figure skater has turned her attention to making noise, not listening to it. Meissner's name is buzzing through a lot of ears right now at the World Figure Skating Championships. She enters today's free-skate program with a shot at a medal, even closer to the podium than she was at the Winter Games last month.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | February 24, 2006
TURIN, ITALY-- --As Sasha Cohen stood on a podium and felt 20 ounces of silver pulling at her neck, David Raith was talking about the future. Raith is the executive director of U.S. Figure Skating. You bet he's excited about Cohen's finish, but his hope comes from scanning further down the leader board. If there were a script, you'd know that these Olympics were meant to be the Sasha Games. Now look ahead four years, as Raith does, and you can see why he's optimistic. Michelle Kwan will be gone.
NEWS
By RICK MAESE | February 21, 2006
TURIN, Italy-- --The stars have fallen from the Olympic sky. By now you know the names: Michelle Kwan, Bode Miller, Johnny Weir, Apolo Ohno. Total medal count: one bronze among them. The skiers, the curlers and the hockey puck hurlers, one by one they've found disappointment at these Winter Games. There's one last big name set to make her debut tonight - figure skater Sasha Cohen - and one American underdog quietly waiting in the shadows. Kimmie Meissner, the youngest member of Team USA, sure seems like a big deal around Maryland, doesn't she?
NEWS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | February 19, 2006
Turin, Italy -- She's not supposed to be here. Kimmie Meissner's Olympic plan called for a showdown with the world's best figure skaters at the 2010 Winter Games. Tear up the blueprint. She's ready now. Like an escalator on full power, Meissner rose through the competition at each age level, stopping to win a title before surging past her peers. On Tuesday, she'll take the ice with skating's elite women, four years ahead of schedule. It is, she says, "the cherry on top" of a short but sparkling career.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | January 15, 1998
WHENEVER the subject of home exercise equipment comes up in conversation, I like to tell the Story of the Ab Roller.The Story of the Ab Roller begins a few weeks before Christmas, when my 12-year-old daughter appeared in the kitchen with an announcement."
NEWS
By RICK MAESE | February 21, 2006
TURIN, Italy-- --The stars have fallen from the Olympic sky. By now you know the names: Michelle Kwan, Bode Miller, Johnny Weir, Apolo Ohno. Total medal count: one bronze among them. The skiers, the curlers and the hockey puck hurlers, one by one they've found disappointment at these Winter Games. There's one last big name set to make her debut tonight - figure skater Sasha Cohen - and one American underdog quietly waiting in the shadows. Kimmie Meissner, the youngest member of Team USA, sure seems like a big deal around Maryland, doesn't she?
SPORTS
February 14, 2006
Did Michelle Kwan give up too soon on skating in Turin? I think it was unfair and selfish of her to go in the first place. After all, she didn't earn it - she was grandfathered in. She took up a slot she shouldn't have. Ego became ME-GO. Steve Childers Aberdeen No, absolutely not. These athletes know their bodies and can readily determine if they are physically able to perform at a top level. What Kwan did was very honorable and selfless. Patrick R. Lynch Parkville For all of the hard work that spanned over four years, Michelle Kwan quit too soon.
SPORTS
By RANDY HARVEY and RANDY HARVEY,SUN REPORTER | February 13, 2006
TURIN, Italy -- The first time I interviewed Michelle Kwan, she was 13. Already the star of the International Ice Castles, a high-performance rink in the San Bernardino Mountains east of Los Angeles, she was preparing for her second senior U.S. championships and dreaming of going to the 1994 Winter Olympics. She told me that she had learned only a few months before that the Olympics were a competition. She had been under the impression that they were a place. "Like Disneyland," she said.
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