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NEWS
March 5, 1992
What a way to remember a Renaissance master! On Friday, computer experts say, an act of vandalism comes to light on the terminals of personal computer users worldwide. A virus, a short, vicious program called "Michelangelo," named for the great Italian artist, is set to erase the programs and data files in permanent storage on the hard disks of IBM-compatible computers.What this virus does on its target date is to wipe everything from storage and write gibberish in its place, so the damaged files cannot be recovered even after they are gone.
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NEWS
February 8, 2013
I realize the point of your recent article on the Michelangelo's pizza shop in Towson was to demonstrate the effect of the Super Bowl on local businesses ("Pizzerias expect a boost from Super Bowl watchers," Feb. 3). However, it also illustrated another important story: How an immigrant in our wonderful country can play by the rules and become a success. Shop owner Khawar Ghafoor has worked hard and done all the right things to become a true asset to the U.S. He could have sneaked in and sponged off the system like so many others, but he didn't.
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FEATURES
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 11, 2002
WASHINGTON - Last spring, a visiting museum director from Scotland was rummaging through a storeroom of the Smithsonian Institution's Cooper-Hewitt collection in New York when he turned to a box full of lighting-fixture sketches by unknown Italian artists. One unsigned drawing of an enormous branched candelabrum, possibly a menorah, struck the visitor as special. Tuesday, the Smithsonian confirmed his judgment. According to an international panel of Renaissance art scholars, the drawing is the work of the great Italian sculptor and artist Michelangelo.
NEWS
November 19, 2006
The Lost Painting By Jonathan Harr This is Harr's acclaimed book about the search for a lost painting by Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio. He traces the painting's tangled history masterfully, like a suspense writer slipping us the details of a mystery that has held its secrets for nearly four centuries. Critics loved the book, calling it "rich and wonderful" and "an effortlessly educational and marvelously entertaining mix of art history and scholarly sleuthing." Harr's first book was A Civil Action.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | March 8, 1992
Michelangelo's birthday passed Friday without a glitch in any of thecomputers used in county and school government offices.Checks ofthe 225-plus computers in county offices and the 125 or so in schooloffices failed to show any sign of the highly destructive computer virus known as Michelangelo."
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | March 12, 1992
Computer users who managed to make it through Friday -- the strike date for the "Michelangelo" computer virus -- with their files intact shouldn't breathe too easy. Another virus is set to hit tomorrow, Friday the 13th.Dubbed "Jerusalem" for the city in which it is thought to have originated, tomorrow's virus is decidedly less destructive than its March 6 kin, but a problem nonetheless. The Jerusalem virus, which has been around for about three years, shows up every Friday the 13th.Like Michelangelo, the Jerusalem virus affects only International Business Machines Corp.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 22, 1996
WASHINGTON - Michelangelo's drawings and a bevy of works based on them by other Renaissance artists are available to be viewed and enjoyed at the National Gallery of Art, thanks to their current owner, Queen Elizabeth II of Britain.Estimates of the number of Michelangelo drawings in existence vary from about 350 to 750 - with no more than 10 believed to be in the United States."Michelangelo and His Influence: Drawings From Windsor Castle" temporarily augments this small figure, with 22 drawings on 18 sheets by Michelangelo, and more than four dozen works by contemporaries who drew inspiration from him.The exhibition remains on display in the museum's East Building through Jan. 5.Few artists in history evoke as much reverence as Michelangelo.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff Writer | July 13, 1994
It took Michelangelo four years to complete the Sistine Chapel ceiling.It took Joe Helms two and a half months.Michelangelo had a patron, Lorenzo de' Medici.Mr. Helms could use one.Michelangelo painted his frescoes "solely for the glory of God."Mr. Helms did it for the "free advertising."When Michelangelo pleaded exhaustion, Pope Julius II forced him to finish his back-breaking labor.This October, when the current pope visits Baltimore, he has an open invitation to critique Mr. Helms' fine work.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | March 12, 1992
Computer users who managed to make it through Friday -- the strike date for the "Michelangelo" computer virus -- with their files intact shouldn't breathe too easy. Another virus is set to hit tomorrow, Friday the 13th.Dubbed "Jerusalem" for the city in which it is thought to have originated, tomorrow's virus is decidedly less destructive than its March 6 kin, but a problem nonetheless.The Jerusalem virus, which has been around for about three years, shows up every Friday the 13th.Like Michelangelo, the Jerusalem virus affects only International Business Machines Corp.
NEWS
By Courtney C. Walsh and By Courtney C. Walsh,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 25, 2001
ROME - In Rome there are more churches than there are days of the year. However, few boast the history of Baltimore Archbishop William H. Keeler's titular church, Santa Maria degli Angeli e Martiri, which dates back hundreds of years and was one of the last works of Michelangelo. Now the basilica is again making history with the installation of a sophisticated glass dome over the "oculus," or opening, in the rotunda over its entrance. "I never in my life imagined I would have a chance to put my hands to shaping a work in a building created by the Romans, reshaped by Michelangelo and now the official church of the Italian state," says its designer, Narcissus Quagliata.
NEWS
By James Beck | June 1, 2004
RESTORERS in Florence have just completed a cosmetic job on Michelangelo's "David," with the usual amount of self-congratulatory rhetoric about the rediscovery of its "original" glory. Of course, that is impossible to achieve because of normal aging, hundreds of years of weathering and damage, and even harsh cleanings in the past. And while the Florentine officials were patting themselves on the back, they were ignoring the statue's real problems: potential instability because of weaknesses in the stone and a questionable base.
NEWS
March 23, 2004
Roy F. Craig, 79, who worked on the nation's largest, most systematic investigation of flying saucers, died of cancer Thursday at his 186-acre La Boca Ranch, a former Indian trading post in Ignacio, Colo. Dr. Craig was chief field investigator for The Colorado Project, the official government search for scientifically verifiable evidence of the existence of unidentified flying objects. The three-volume Condon report that Dr. Craig co-authored debunked mysteries about outer space, yet he said UFOs did get people to think about the possibility of extraterrestrial life.
FEATURES
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 11, 2002
WASHINGTON - Last spring, a visiting museum director from Scotland was rummaging through a storeroom of the Smithsonian Institution's Cooper-Hewitt collection in New York when he turned to a box full of lighting-fixture sketches by unknown Italian artists. One unsigned drawing of an enormous branched candelabrum, possibly a menorah, struck the visitor as special. Tuesday, the Smithsonian confirmed his judgment. According to an international panel of Renaissance art scholars, the drawing is the work of the great Italian sculptor and artist Michelangelo.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | March 17, 2002
Folks looking for a combination of top-notch talent and substantive programs are virtually guaranteed satisfaction at the Shriver Hall Concert Series. Tonight's event is a case in point. Making his Shriver Hall debut will be Russian baritone Sergei Leiferkus, whose previous appearances in the region include the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's memorable presentation of Tchaikovsky's Iolanta and the Washington Opera's production of Wagner's Parsifal. Leiferkus will perform two of the most inspired vocal works in the Russian repertoire -- Mussorgsky's Songs and Dances of Death and Shostakovich's Suite on Verses by Michelangelo.
NEWS
By Courtney C. Walsh and By Courtney C. Walsh,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 25, 2001
ROME - In Rome there are more churches than there are days of the year. However, few boast the history of Baltimore Archbishop William H. Keeler's titular church, Santa Maria degli Angeli e Martiri, which dates back hundreds of years and was one of the last works of Michelangelo. Now the basilica is again making history with the installation of a sophisticated glass dome over the "oculus," or opening, in the rotunda over its entrance. "I never in my life imagined I would have a chance to put my hands to shaping a work in a building created by the Romans, reshaped by Michelangelo and now the official church of the Italian state," says its designer, Narcissus Quagliata.
TRAVEL
April 22, 2001
The new Gettysburg Expedition guide could make a Civil War enthusiast out of children as well as adults. The three-part multimedia kit (the first product for the travel guide company TravelBrains) uses interactive games, quizzes, movies and tour narration to give users a better understanding of one of the most decisive battles in the Civil War. A six-section CD-ROM takes you step-by-step through the battle and the history leading up to it, and includes a 30-minute movie, animated battle maps, soldier biog-raphies, a game that puts you in the position of field commander and a trip planner.
NEWS
By Scott Shane | March 10, 1992
In the room the women come and goTalking of Michelangelo.! -- T.S. EliotWhat would Buonarroti think,Landing in U.S.A. today?From Toys-R-Us to Compu-LinkHis name's our culture's main mainstay.At first, perhaps, he'd be amazedHis genius spans the centuries.Pieta still leaves 'em dazed;Sistine's ceiling still can please.''Nah, Mikie's not some boring dead guy --like, this turtle freak, y'know?''(As some kind kid would clarify)''These chemicals, like, made him grow.''As Buonarroti scratched his headSome hardened software type would say:''Your hard disk data's simply deadIf Michelangelo has its way.''Thus, baffled, would the great man flee-- With floppy disk and turtle gum, too --Back to the 16th centuryTo tell them just what things would come to.Buonarroti saw in marbleHeroes struggling to be free.
NEWS
March 23, 2004
Roy F. Craig, 79, who worked on the nation's largest, most systematic investigation of flying saucers, died of cancer Thursday at his 186-acre La Boca Ranch, a former Indian trading post in Ignacio, Colo. Dr. Craig was chief field investigator for The Colorado Project, the official government search for scientifically verifiable evidence of the existence of unidentified flying objects. The three-volume Condon report that Dr. Craig co-authored debunked mysteries about outer space, yet he said UFOs did get people to think about the possibility of extraterrestrial life.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2000
"Beyond the Clouds" emerges as a heartfelt, hard-earned swan song from a director blessed with one of the cinema's most discerning eyes. For more than half a century, Italian director Michelangelo Antonioni has been using the movie screen as an easel, painting motion pictures of unsurpassed beauty and lyricism. No one who has seen "L'Aventura," Blow Up" or "The Passenger" is likely to forget the uniquely stylized tableaux Antonioni consistently puts on the screen. Largely absent from filmmaking since suffering a stroke in 1985, Antonioni (with the help of German director Wim Wenders, who co-wrote the screenplay and handled some of the framing sequences)
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1998
CARTHAGE, Mo. -- It was as Sam Butcher gazed up at Michelangelo's frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel that he hit on an inspiration.He would build his own Sistine Chapel.Butcher is the creator of Precious Moments, the sentimental porcelain figurines of teardrop-eyed children that have become one of the top collectibles in the world, sometimes outstripping Hummel figures in sales.Precious Moments figurines made Butcher a millionaire, and he decided he wanted to use some of those millions to build something seemingly impractical, but beautiful: a chapel, like the Sistine, but with murals that featured Precious Moments characters.
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