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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
Though neither is known for joking around, beleagured restaraunteur Denise Whiting and former Lt. Gov. Michael Steele will be among those competing for the title of Baltimore's Funniest Celebrity. The Cafe Hon owner and the former face of the Republican party will vie for the title against musician Deanna Bogart, one-time city council candidate De'von Brown,  meteorologist Steve Fertig, news anchor Jeff Barnd and Baltimore Sun sports columnist Peter Schmuck.  If most of those folks don't strike you as particularly funny, that's exactly the point, says Richard Siegel, the founder of the event, which will happen for the second time in Baltimore on June 27. The contest has been running for 18 years in D.C. "I think people that are serious are funny because people don't expect it -- which is funny," says Siegel, a long-time stand-up comedy performer.
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Thomas F. Schaller | September 2, 2014
I miss Bob Ehrlich. Seriously, I do. I realize the former governor shares space with me here on the Baltimore Sun's opinion pages; in terms of sheer column inches, I suppose Mr. Ehrlich the Pundit is never that far away. But I'm talking about Mr. Ehrlich the Politician. A dozen years have passed since Mr. Ehrlich first ran for governor, in 2002. He beat then-Democratic Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend that year. Along with his running mate, Michael Steele, Mr. Ehrlich seemed to have revived the Maryland Republican Party almost overnight.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
This segment of Chuck Todd's "The Daily Rundown" Monday got more media bounce than usual for the show thanks to MSNBC commentator Michael Steele sounding very serious about running for governor in Maryland. But to me, it was first and foremost the perfect tableau of the troubled channel as TV boneyard for unemployed politicos. This video featuring Steele and put-out-to-pasture Obama spokesman Robert Gibbs illustrates not only the reason MSNBC is dying in the ratings, but also the deeper disease of our democracy with cable channels handing over airtime to talking heads who are committed to ideology and partisan political gain, not information, analysis or civic enlightenment.
NEWS
August 16, 2013
Well, well, well, The Sun has reported that the first "gaffe" in the governor's race came when Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler was secretly recorded (surely not by someone involved with the Brown campaign, wink, wink) telling supporters that Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown is basically running on his race alone because he has "accomplished little" while serving as lieutenant governor. ("Gansler's gaffe," Aug. 14). Please stop me if you've heard this before, but The Sun basically said the same thing about Michael Steele when he joined the ticket of Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. as his lieutenant governor a decade ago. I believe the actual quote was, "Mr Steele brings little to the table besides the color of his skin.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | March 4, 2009
Michael Steele said he's sorry to Rush Limbaugh. Why stop there? The man who won the Republican National Committee chairmanship on the strength of his silver tongue called the radio personality "incendiary," "ugly" and - worse! - an "entertainer." He also insisted that Limbaugh is not the de facto leader of the Republican Party. Limbaugh took that last one as a compliment, responding on the air: "I would be embarrassed to say that I'm in charge of the Republican Party in the sad-sack state that it's in."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2011
One thing about Michael Steele: He's not afraid to mix it up. Push the former Maryland lieutenant governor in an interview, and he'll come right back at you. That's how it went last week with the Johns Hopkins University graduate when he was asked for his reaction to those who say MSNBC hired him recently to be the channel's token conservative — a right-wing, Republican version of the role Alan Colmes played on Fox News. "What's my reaction?" Steele said. "Tune in, that's my reaction.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | February 15, 2009
Michael Steele's multi-tasking kid sister billed his Senate campaign more than $37,000 for "catering/web" services provided by her investment company. Serving up coffee, coding in Java and betting on Jamaican Blue Mountain futures - all in a day's work at Brown Sugar Unlimited LLC. Even with all that catering, Web wizardry and investing going on, Monica Turner somehow found time to be a pediatrician, mom and ex-Mrs. Mike Tyson. How did she keep all those balls in the air? Sibling rivalry, baby.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,paul.west@baltsun.com | March 8, 2009
The media have piled on poor Michael Steele. From Rush Limbaugh's radio network to the columns of The Baltimore Sun, the Republican national chairman got pummeled for his dumb remark on a comedy show that nobody watches. A few days after Steele's appearance on D.L. Hughley Breaks the News, CNN quietly announced that it was dropping the program. But Steele's biggest challenge lurks within the insular world of party politics. As soon as he became chairman, the former Maryland lieutenant governor cleaned house at the national headquarters.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | November 10, 2006
Democratic National Committee Chairman Howard Dean slapped Maryland Democrats yesterday, saying state leaders need to promote more black candidates in the future so "we do not have another Michael Steele problem." "I just think we have got to do a better job in Maryland four years from now about diversity on the ticket," Dean said during a Washington breakfast, raising particular concerns about Steele, the state's black Republican lieutenant governor who ran a competitive race for U.S. Senate partly on a theme that Democrats have taken African-American voters for granted.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Howard Libit and David Nitkin and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2002
Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. picked state Republican Party Chairman Michael S. Steele as his gubernatorial running mate yesterday, declaring that two self-made candidates were joining forces to form an "opportunity ticket" crossing racial and geographic boundaries. Steele, 43, is a Prince George's County resident and former corporate attorney who has spent two years trying to rebuild a teetering GOP organization shut out of statewide office since Charles McC. Mathias left the U.S. Senate 16 years ago. He has never held elected office but is credited with engineering the party's most recent victory, a decision last month by the state Court of Appeals to overturn legislative district maps drawn by Gov. Parris N. Glendening and other top Democrats.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | July 14, 2013
OK, the subject is race, so I'm going to ask the "haters" from both ends of the spectrum to step outside the chat room. You know who you are. Some of you were upset when I asked Michael Steele to run on my gubernatorial ticket in 2002. A few of you told me so quietly - the way white racism usually plays out today. (Those who chose to engage on this issue received a none-too-polite response; few decided to press the matter.) You were also the ones with the disapproving stares at Kendel Ehrlich when she appeared in public with one of our black executive protection state troopers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
This segment of Chuck Todd's "The Daily Rundown" Monday got more media bounce than usual for the show thanks to MSNBC commentator Michael Steele sounding very serious about running for governor in Maryland. But to me, it was first and foremost the perfect tableau of the troubled channel as TV boneyard for unemployed politicos. This video featuring Steele and put-out-to-pasture Obama spokesman Robert Gibbs illustrates not only the reason MSNBC is dying in the ratings, but also the deeper disease of our democracy with cable channels handing over airtime to talking heads who are committed to ideology and partisan political gain, not information, analysis or civic enlightenment.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | October 23, 2012
Republicans in Maryland often wonder why they lose. The letter sent last week by Michael Steele and Audrey Scott to Maryland Republicans urging them to vote for expanded gambling is a perfect example of how the party solidifies its minority status. In it, the former Republican National Committee chairman and lieutenant governor and a former Maryland GOP chairwoman rally the troops for crony capitalism as if they were wearing Halloween masks of Senate President Mike Miller and Gov. Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | June 13, 2012
Maryland's former LG was spotted today by POLITCO having lunch at Ben's Chili Bowl in Washington, D.C. with funny man Pauly Shore. Shore has some upcoming gigs at the 9:30 Club, but the D.C.-centered website failed to mention that Michael Steele is also on tour. He's is set to compete in Baltimore later this month for the title Charm City's " Funniest Celebrity . "  Last year the award went to Baltimore Police Commissioner Fred Bealefeld. We couldn't speak to Steel directly, but show producer Richard Siegel got him on the line and reported that Steele made fun of his recent, shaky tenure at the helm of the Republican National Committee: "Since the RNC gig didn't work out as well as I thought it would, I thought I would give this a try. " Steele will share the spotlight with notorious Baltimore "Hon" Denise Whiting, failed city council candidate De'Von Brown, FOX 45 anchor Jeff Barnd and musician Deanna Bogart.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
Though neither is known for joking around, beleagured restaraunteur Denise Whiting and former Lt. Gov. Michael Steele will be among those competing for the title of Baltimore's Funniest Celebrity. The Cafe Hon owner and the former face of the Republican party will vie for the title against musician Deanna Bogart, one-time city council candidate De'von Brown,  meteorologist Steve Fertig, news anchor Jeff Barnd and Baltimore Sun sports columnist Peter Schmuck.  If most of those folks don't strike you as particularly funny, that's exactly the point, says Richard Siegel, the founder of the event, which will happen for the second time in Baltimore on June 27. The contest has been running for 18 years in D.C. "I think people that are serious are funny because people don't expect it -- which is funny," says Siegel, a long-time stand-up comedy performer.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2011
A Baltimore developer has paid a $55,000 fine to settle a case in which the Federal Election Commission found the company used corporate funds to make campaign contributions in the names of company executives during the 2006 election cycle. Edward St. John, chairman and owner of St. John Properties Inc., agreed to pay the civil penalty after the commission found that political contributions by six senior vice presidents, who were later reimbursed by the company, violated laws that prohibit corporations from using general funds to help elect candidates to federal office, the FEC reported.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 1, 2004
NEW YORK - The Republican Party offers Americans of all backgrounds a shot at prosperity by fostering economic growth and competition, Maryland Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele declared last night in a prime-time convention speech that ridiculed John Kerry as unfit to lead the nation. Granted the most prominent speaking role of any African-American at the convention, Steele invoked Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. as he built a case that the Republicans' vision of helping the poor without "destroying" the rich is more favorable to blacks - as well as whites - than the Democrats' vision is. "What truly defines the civil rights challenge today isn't whether you can get a seat at the lunch counter," Steele said.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2002
The day after he won Maryland's gubernatorial election, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. appeared before the press, gripped his running mate's shoulder and declared, "Michael Steele is my real partner. That was not a campaign slogan." It might seem an odd thing to stress at that moment, but considering the topsy-turvy relationships between Maryland's top two executives over the years, Ehrlich's advertisement of harmony made sense. In addition, the remarks foreshadowed what Steele says will be his highly active tenure as lieutenant governor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2011
One thing about Michael Steele: He's not afraid to mix it up. Push the former Maryland lieutenant governor in an interview, and he'll come right back at you. That's how it went last week with the Johns Hopkins University graduate when he was asked for his reaction to those who say MSNBC hired him recently to be the channel's token conservative — a right-wing, Republican version of the role Alan Colmes played on Fox News. "What's my reaction?" Steele said. "Tune in, that's my reaction.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2011
Dear Michael Steele, Don't do it, Mike! Sorry for the familiarity, but given that you're our former lieut-guv and all, I thought it would be OK. Plus, this is urgent, and there's simply no time for formalities. I saw in the New York Post last week that you're back in the job market, now that the Republican National Committee has shown you the door, and you're already talking to both Fox News and CNN about becoming a paid commentator. No big shock there, given that you were previously a Fox talker and barely broke your media stride during the couple of years that you chaired the RNC. And no surprise because TV is obviously your natural habitat — you look good, you schmooze well and, probably most important in this medium, at any point in time you are likely to say something crazy.
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