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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 15, 1997
I am not a big fan of travel programs on television.If you are interested in travel, go travel. Don't sit on a couch with a bag of potato chips and watch an 8-inch-tall video image of someone else traveling.Forget the loss of any sense of adventure or participating in life as a doer instead of a viewer; television can't even really deliver much of a visual sense of the exotic or the different. The scope of the screen is too small for panorama, too flat for texture; and television deals best in the repetition of the familiar until it becomes cliche or stereotype.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 10, 2007
Dreamgirls [Paramount] $35 The two-disc DVD set lives up to its "Showstopper Edition" moniker. It doesn't include any commentary from writer-director Bill Condon, but it's overflowing with extras, including a comprehensive making-of documentary, "Building the Dream," as well as numerous mini-docs that explore the complicated shooting and editing process for the musical numbers, the evocative costume design and even the theatrical lighting. Also featured are Beyonce Knowles' and Anika Noni Rose's auditions, 12 extended and alternate musical numbers and Knowles' music video of the Oscar-nominated tune, "Listen."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and By Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | June 23, 2002
A pair of proper Victorian ladies, sporting well-starched collars and wearing multiple layers of petticoats. Sitting in a Parisian brothel. Having tea with Pablo Picasso. Purchasing a sketch he'd made on the back of a brown paper bag. Discussing the finer points of cubism. Welcome to a day in the life of Claribel and Etta Cone, those tastefully eccentric sisters whose gift to their adopted city was one of the finest -- not to mention largest -- collections of impressionist art ever amassed by private collectors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and By Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | June 23, 2002
A pair of proper Victorian ladies, sporting well-starched collars and wearing multiple layers of petticoats. Sitting in a Parisian brothel. Having tea with Pablo Picasso. Purchasing a sketch he'd made on the back of a brown paper bag. Discussing the finer points of cubism. Welcome to a day in the life of Claribel and Etta Cone, those tastefully eccentric sisters whose gift to their adopted city was one of the finest -- not to mention largest -- collections of impressionist art ever amassed by private collectors.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 3, 2000
Michael Palin, the Monty Python alum who's become PBS' favorite traveling man, takes a TV walk in the shoes of Ernest Hemingway, and macho manhood will never be the same. "Michael Palin's Hemingway Adventure," which begins tonight on public television, is a delightful travelogue, but the real fun is in the way Palin subverts the notion of masculinity offered by Hemingway in his writings and life and subtly constructs a new definition of what it means to be a man. The fun starts with the opening credits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 10, 2007
Dreamgirls [Paramount] $35 The two-disc DVD set lives up to its "Showstopper Edition" moniker. It doesn't include any commentary from writer-director Bill Condon, but it's overflowing with extras, including a comprehensive making-of documentary, "Building the Dream," as well as numerous mini-docs that explore the complicated shooting and editing process for the musical numbers, the evocative costume design and even the theatrical lighting. Also featured are Beyonce Knowles' and Anika Noni Rose's auditions, 12 extended and alternate musical numbers and Knowles' music video of the Oscar-nominated tune, "Listen."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 3, 1999
Life after 'Python'The members of Monty Python released their last film, "Monty Python's Meaning of Life," in 1983. Here's a brief look at their careers outside the group:* Graham Chapman: After overcoming alcoholism and a lifelong case of stage fright, Chapman went on well-received lecture tours of college campuses through most of the 1980s. He also produced, co-wrote and starred in the film "Yellowbeard." Chapman died of cancer Oct. 4, 1989, one day short of "Python's" 20th anniversary.
FEATURES
By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,Special to the sun | May 31, 1998
"Hemingway's Chair," by Michael Palin. St. Martin's Press. 288 pages. $23.95.Monty Python actor Michael Palin's first novel, "Hemingway's Chair," is a mildly delightful romantic comedy, a generous, sweet book that is instructive to all budding writers in that unforgiving genre. Its successes and failures are like examples in a textbook.The integral parts are all here, ready for film adaption: 1) Setting: an old-fashioned post office in a small, kooky English town called Theston. As in any good sitcom, there are a half-dozen rooms in which most of the action occurs.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | January 9, 1993
Television viewers could hardly choose a better vicarious traveling companion than Michael Palin, the one-time antic member of Monty Python's Flying Circus who sets out this weekend on a most exotic journey: a 23,000-mile trip from the North to the South Pole."
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1996
The Maryland state prosecutor is making inquiries about $10,000 in campaign donations given Gov. Parris N. Glendening by New York contributors -- including principals in a company whose $1.5 million-a-year lease with the state for office space expires in April.Principals of Sachs Investing Co. Inc. -- a New York company whose subsidiary, Stanbalt Realty, owns 501 St. Paul Place, the old Standard Oil Building -- family members and a business associate each gave the Glendening campaign $2,000 on the same date in October 1994.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 26, 2001
Monty Python and the Holy Grail is a shot in the funny bone - or, rather, an entire fusillade of shots, some landing on bones you never realized could be funny. French knights send Arthur King of the Britons into retreat with taunts, such as "I blow my nose at you, so-called `Arthur King.' " Catapulted cow and Trojan Rabbit alike curl across the screen like arrows crossed with boomerangs. Arthur can't make his way to Camelot without rousing discussions of class warfare, and once he gets there, he has a nightmare musical-comedy vision of a chorus line singing "We're knights of the Round Table, our shows are for-mi-dable."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 3, 2000
Michael Palin, the Monty Python alum who's become PBS' favorite traveling man, takes a TV walk in the shoes of Ernest Hemingway, and macho manhood will never be the same. "Michael Palin's Hemingway Adventure," which begins tonight on public television, is a delightful travelogue, but the real fun is in the way Palin subverts the notion of masculinity offered by Hemingway in his writings and life and subtly constructs a new definition of what it means to be a man. The fun starts with the opening credits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 3, 1999
Life after 'Python'The members of Monty Python released their last film, "Monty Python's Meaning of Life," in 1983. Here's a brief look at their careers outside the group:* Graham Chapman: After overcoming alcoholism and a lifelong case of stage fright, Chapman went on well-received lecture tours of college campuses through most of the 1980s. He also produced, co-wrote and starred in the film "Yellowbeard." Chapman died of cancer Oct. 4, 1989, one day short of "Python's" 20th anniversary.
FEATURES
By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,Special to the sun | May 31, 1998
"Hemingway's Chair," by Michael Palin. St. Martin's Press. 288 pages. $23.95.Monty Python actor Michael Palin's first novel, "Hemingway's Chair," is a mildly delightful romantic comedy, a generous, sweet book that is instructive to all budding writers in that unforgiving genre. Its successes and failures are like examples in a textbook.The integral parts are all here, ready for film adaption: 1) Setting: an old-fashioned post office in a small, kooky English town called Theston. As in any good sitcom, there are a half-dozen rooms in which most of the action occurs.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 15, 1997
I am not a big fan of travel programs on television.If you are interested in travel, go travel. Don't sit on a couch with a bag of potato chips and watch an 8-inch-tall video image of someone else traveling.Forget the loss of any sense of adventure or participating in life as a doer instead of a viewer; television can't even really deliver much of a visual sense of the exotic or the different. The scope of the screen is too small for panorama, too flat for texture; and television deals best in the repetition of the familiar until it becomes cliche or stereotype.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1996
The Maryland state prosecutor is making inquiries about $10,000 in campaign donations given Gov. Parris N. Glendening by New York contributors -- including principals in a company whose $1.5 million-a-year lease with the state for office space expires in April.Principals of Sachs Investing Co. Inc. -- a New York company whose subsidiary, Stanbalt Realty, owns 501 St. Paul Place, the old Standard Oil Building -- family members and a business associate each gave the Glendening campaign $2,000 on the same date in October 1994.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 26, 2001
Monty Python and the Holy Grail is a shot in the funny bone - or, rather, an entire fusillade of shots, some landing on bones you never realized could be funny. French knights send Arthur King of the Britons into retreat with taunts, such as "I blow my nose at you, so-called `Arthur King.' " Catapulted cow and Trojan Rabbit alike curl across the screen like arrows crossed with boomerangs. Arthur can't make his way to Camelot without rousing discussions of class warfare, and once he gets there, he has a nightmare musical-comedy vision of a chorus line singing "We're knights of the Round Table, our shows are for-mi-dable."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1995
The American spirit of community service and creative entrepreneurship are on display tonight, from a show honoring good citizens to a profile of Microsoft innovator Bill Gates. Alas, another side of our society also gets some cable scrutiny: Alleged treason in the spy game.* "Encounters: The Hidden Truth" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Weird stuff. In place of the kooky "VR.5," which did not make the Fox fall schedule, comes a special that investigates unexplained cattle mutilations, the eerie events surrounding the movie "The Exorcist" and contemporary exorcisms.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | January 9, 1993
Television viewers could hardly choose a better vicarious traveling companion than Michael Palin, the one-time antic member of Monty Python's Flying Circus who sets out this weekend on a most exotic journey: a 23,000-mile trip from the North to the South Pole."
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