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By Stephen Wigler | March 20, 1997
One of the most important musical premieres taking place in Baltimore this season is a coming performance in Meyerhoff Hall by the celebrated British a cappella vocal ensemble the King's Singers, with the Baltimore Choral Arts Society, of a new work by distinguished American composer Libby Larsen.Larsen was jointly commissioned by the King's Singers, the BCAS and the City of Birmingham Symphony Chorus to write a piece based on an extended prose poem by Michael Ondaatje (the author of the Booker Award-winning novel "The English Patient")
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | March 20, 1997
One of the most important musical premieres taking place in Baltimore this season is a coming performance in Meyerhoff Hall by the celebrated British a cappella vocal ensemble the King's Singers, with the Baltimore Choral Arts Society, of a new work by distinguished American composer Libby Larsen.Larsen was jointly commissioned by the King's Singers, the BCAS and the City of Birmingham Symphony Chorus to write a piece based on an extended prose poem by Michael Ondaatje (the author of the Booker Award-winning novel "The English Patient")
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NEWS
By Sherie Posesorski | February 10, 1991
FROM INK LAKE:CANADIAN STORIES.Selected by Michael Ondaatje.Viking.714 pages. $25.95. Some of the short stories by the 50 Canadian authors in "FroInk Lake" are favorites I grew up with, like Stephen Leacock's "L'envoi: the Train to Mariposa" and Morley Callaghan's "Ancient Lineage." Others are ones that I have grown to love, like Margaret Atwood's "The Man from Mars," Alice Munro's "Miles City, Montana."What is an unanticipated delight of this collection is that although most of the authors are well-known, editor Michael Ondaatje has made a concerted effort, as he states in the introduction, to seek out less familiar work by familiar authors and introduce up-and-coming authors to a new audience.
NEWS
By Anne Whitehouse | October 25, 1992
THE ENGLISH PATIENT.Michael Ondaatje.Knopf.307 pages. $21. Toward the close of World War II, in the half-ruined Villa San Girolamo in the Tuscan hills, a young Canadian nurse named Hana cares for a man who has been burned beyond recognition in an airplane crash in the North African desert. He is dying without having divulged his name; he says only that he is English. He lies immobile in bed -- "a man without a face, an ebony pool" -- while his mind wanders back to the journey across the desert with the Bedouin who saved his life, and to his desert expeditions of the previous decade in search of legendary oases.
NEWS
By Anne Whitehouse | October 25, 1992
THE ENGLISH PATIENT.Michael Ondaatje.Knopf.307 pages. $21. Toward the close of World War II, in the half-ruined Villa San Girolamo in the Tuscan hills, a young Canadian nurse named Hana cares for a man who has been burned beyond recognition in an airplane crash in the North African desert. He is dying without having divulged his name; he says only that he is English. He lies immobile in bed -- "a man without a face, an ebony pool" -- while his mind wanders back to the journey across the desert with the Bedouin who saved his life, and to his desert expeditions of the previous decade in search of legendary oases.
NEWS
March 26, 1997
THEY DON'T give an Oscar for historical accuracy, or it would have been one that "The English Patient" didn't win. The internationally made movie ran away with nine, including best picture, in the 69th annual Academy Awards ritual of self-congratulation before a world-wide audience."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Tucker and By Ken Tucker,Special to the Sun | November 5, 2000
"Angelhead: My Brother's Descent Into Madness," by Greg Bottoms. Crown. 207 pages. $22. Greg Bottoms has a terribly sad, frightening tale to tell about his big brother Michael, and he tells it as straightforwardly as his book's subtitle suggests. While still a teen-ager, Michael took drugs including hallucinogens that convinced him he'd seen God and angels (hence his nickname, "Angelhead"). He also began experiencing psychotic breaks that resulted in extreme depression and violent behavior.
NEWS
By JOAN MELLEN and JOAN MELLEN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 1996
It may have been possible for a movie version of "The English Patient" to capture the spirit of Michael Ondaatje's sublime novel, but the current film directed by Anthony Minghella must disappoint anyone who has read and loved the book. In principle it need not have been so.Although the words of novels do not find absolute equivalents in the images of film, film offers the power of physical reality to which a novel can only refer. "Words, Caravaggio," says Count de Almasy in the novel, "they have a power."
FEATURES
By Ralph Blumenthal and Ralph Blumenthal,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 7, 1999
NEW YORK -- Long before she started working on an unfamiliar new computer that gave her migraine headaches and long before she learned she had cancer, Jini Fiennes conceived of her sixth and most ambitious novel, "Blood Ties," a cyclical tale of wounded generations and the redeeming power of love.Writing again after years of struggle alongside her husband to raise seven children on little money in England and Ireland, she finished the book in 1989 and then absorbed rejection after rejection from publishers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dinitia Smith and Dinitia Smith,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 18, 2004
Writers just want to be humiliated. Over and over again. That's the way it seemed to Robin Robertson, a Scottish poet and editor who solicited authors' reminiscences about their most humiliating moments for a book. The stories poured in. Writers, some famous, seemed only too glad to share their humiliations. The result, Mortification: Writers' Stories of Their Public Shame, published last month by Fourth Estate, is bound to ensure their humiliations endure, on paper. "What all or most writers want is communication with the public," Robertson, who just received the E.M. Forster Award for his poetry from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, said from London.
NEWS
By Sherie Posesorski | February 10, 1991
FROM INK LAKE:CANADIAN STORIES.Selected by Michael Ondaatje.Viking.714 pages. $25.95. Some of the short stories by the 50 Canadian authors in "FroInk Lake" are favorites I grew up with, like Stephen Leacock's "L'envoi: the Train to Mariposa" and Morley Callaghan's "Ancient Lineage." Others are ones that I have grown to love, like Margaret Atwood's "The Man from Mars," Alice Munro's "Miles City, Montana."What is an unanticipated delight of this collection is that although most of the authors are well-known, editor Michael Ondaatje has made a concerted effort, as he states in the introduction, to seek out less familiar work by familiar authors and introduce up-and-coming authors to a new audience.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 24, 1997
Musical magic was in great supply Saturday evening at the Meyerhoff with the King's Singers. Only the King's Singers could present Renaissance madrigals and British folk songs with the Beatles, Beach Boys and Bobby McFerrin and a highly demanding contemporary work with such ease and panache.This is one of the few groups whose live performances are much more vivid than their large and splendid recorded repertoire.The motet "Ave Virgo" by the Belgium composer Adrian Willaert impressively began the evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janice Harayda and By Janice Harayda,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 17, 2000
A Good House," by Bonnie Burnard. Henry Holt and Co. 309 pages. $25. Canadian fiction has come a long way since the novelist Hugh MacLennan summed up his country's literature with the line, "Boy meets girl in Winnipeg, and who cares?"
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