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Michael Moore

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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 25, 2004
ARLINGTON, Va. - The Republican National Committee has released a "documentary" to counter Michael Moore's film Fahrenheit 9/11. The film (available for viewing at www.rnc.org) chronicles John Kerry's statements about Iraq and proves to all but the most partisan that this is a man who is a political opportunist and a vacillator who cannot be trusted with the power of the presidency. Opening with Mr. Kerry's pledge at the Democratic National Convention last month to "never mislead us into war," the film shows how Mr. Kerry consistently favored using force to oust Saddam Hussein until it proved politically advantageous for him to reverse course.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | December 10, 2012
When, at long last, will people understand that the left is boring? The question came to mind as I was dipping in and out of Oliver Stone's miasmic 700-plus-page tome. I'll never read the whole thing, and not because it's a left-wing screed full of slimy distortions about the evils of the United States (though that doesn't help). It's that it's boring. Mr. Stone and co-author Peter Kuznick call their book "The Untold History of the United States," except, again, it isn't. This story has been told countless times before.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,sun movie critic | June 2, 2002
CANNES, France - Michael Moore doesn't look the part of hero, but at Cannes, he sure was treated like one. All during the recently concluded film festival, Moore was lauded. The first screening of his film, Bowling for Columbine, a scathing and fitfully satiric look at the United States' infatuation with guns and violence, was followed by a 13-minute standing ovation, the longest anyone at Cannes could remember. His movie, already the first documentary to be entered in the festival in 46 years, was the only one that everybody was talking about.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | October 2, 2009
After submerging himself in the subject of health care in "Sicko," his best film, Michael Moore comes back to crowd-pleasing form with his most wildly uneven movie, "Capitalism: A Love Story." He bases this documentary screed on the litany of disasters that have brought the once fast-breaking American economy to its kneepads - the reckless deregulation of finance and other industries, the homebuying bubble and the legal loan-sharking that went with it, the vast disparity between corporate honchos and the middle class and working poor who are supposed to fuel the economy with their consumption.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 17, 1998
God bless Michael Moore.At a time when movies are rarely more than bedtime stories designed to let us all sleep more soundly, Moore sounds the clarion call of contrarian thinking. During times of comfort and complacency, he insists on seeking out those who have been left out. Amid an epidemic of I've Got Mine-ism, Moore is a persistent, puckish conscience, puncturing the status quo with rapier sarcasm and devastatingly simple logic.From his first film, the 1989 "Roger & Me," in which he haplessly pursued General Motors chief Roger Smith to get an explanation of why a GM plant was closing in Moore's hometown of Flint, Mich.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 25, 2004
In the rare funny bit from Fahrenheit 9/11, writer-director Michael Moore plays the song "Believe It or Not" - the theme to the '80s-TV superhero satire The Greatest American Hero - over the sight of George W. Bush's "Mission Accomplished" moment on that aircraft carrier more than a year ago. This kind of savvy mass-culture coup has made Moore a hero to grass-roots audiences and populist hipsters alike. The excruciatingly apt lyrics include, "Flying away on a wing and a prayer/ Who could it be?
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1999
Prepare to be challenged.By TV.Michael Moore knows that's not how it's usually done; watching TV can be about as challenging as taking a shower. But Moore, a documentary filmmaker who delights in skewering the arrogant and powerful, thinks people want something from their televisions besides a continuous supply of mind candy."
NEWS
July 3, 2007
On June 28, 2007, JEAN RAMONA HORSEY MOORE, devoted mother of Michael Moore. She is also survived by a daughter-in-law, Karen Moore and a host of other relatives and friends. Visitation Tuesday 2 P.M. until 7 P.M. at Howell Funeral Home, 4600 Liberty Heights Avenue (Family present 5 P.M. until 7 P.M.). Chapel closed Wednesday. Mrs. Moore will lie in state at the New Christian Memorial Church, 3525 W. Caton Avenue, Thursday 9 A.M., family hour 11 A.M., Homegoing Celebration 11:30 A.M. Interment following in Arbutus Memorial
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | June 29, 2007
Michael Moore's attack on the American health care industry, Sicko, is his fifth full-length documentary essay - after Roger & Me, The Big One, Bowling for Columbine and Fahrenheit 9/11. Sicko is the first one I can embrace wholeheartedly - the first one I can say I've even liked. For once, his anarchic comic bent and his political sympathies appear to be completely in sync. He still generalizes, underlines, overstates and grandstands. But he stays close to the nuts and bolts of HMOs' focus on the bottom line and politicians' search for campaign funds from Big Pharma.
NEWS
June 10, 2003
On June 6, 2003, DAVIS, beloved father of Michael Moore and Larry Moore. He is also survived by two brothers Charles and William Moore and a host of other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST INC., 4300 Wabash Ave., Wednesday after 8:30 A.M. where the family will receive friends on Thursday at 11:30 A.M. Funeral Services at 12:00 noon. Interment in the Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 28, 2008
This is a big day for the cultural elite in the Miami area, and everyone in Maryland who just had the same thought - "I didn't know there was a cultural elite in the Miami area" - ought to be ashamed of yourselves. The 25th Miami International Film Festival begins today in theaters all around the city and continues until March 9. It will feature 120 movies from 50 countries, including several that debuted at last year's Sundance Film Festival and a restoration of Sergio Leone's classic western Once Upon a Time in the West.
FEATURES
July 13, 2007
Filmmaker Michael Moore continues to raise viewers' awareness through movies that question American institutions or issues. His latest movie, Sicko, which looks at the U.S. health care system, is in theaters. When you watch Moore's documentaries, do they give you food for thought, or are they just entertaining? Explain why. WHAT YOU SAY When I watch a film, I expect some social consciousness. Michael Moore's documentaries always fulfill that need for me. Sicko is brilliant as ordinary people are able to articulate the madness behind a health care system based on profit.
NEWS
July 3, 2007
On June 28, 2007, JEAN RAMONA HORSEY MOORE, devoted mother of Michael Moore. She is also survived by a daughter-in-law, Karen Moore and a host of other relatives and friends. Visitation Tuesday 2 P.M. until 7 P.M. at Howell Funeral Home, 4600 Liberty Heights Avenue (Family present 5 P.M. until 7 P.M.). Chapel closed Wednesday. Mrs. Moore will lie in state at the New Christian Memorial Church, 3525 W. Caton Avenue, Thursday 9 A.M., family hour 11 A.M., Homegoing Celebration 11:30 A.M. Interment following in Arbutus Memorial
NEWS
By Chiaki Kawajiri and Chiaki Kawajiri,Sun Photographer | July 1, 2007
I was intrigued to have the opportunity to photograph Michael Moore, the famed icon of a citizen trying to get answers from powerful and elusive people. Moore won his first fame as a moviemaker with a film that tracked with comic appeal his efforts to get past PR people and security men and interview then-General Motors Chairman Roger Smith. So with the Lone Ranger theme from Roger and Me playing in my head I went off to find Moore and get some photos to illustrate a cover story for an Arts and Entertainment section story pegged to his new movie, Sicko, that focuses on the failings of America's health care system.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | June 29, 2007
Michael Moore's attack on the American health care industry, Sicko, is his fifth full-length documentary essay - after Roger & Me, The Big One, Bowling for Columbine and Fahrenheit 9/11. Sicko is the first one I can embrace wholeheartedly - the first one I can say I've even liked. For once, his anarchic comic bent and his political sympathies appear to be completely in sync. He still generalizes, underlines, overstates and grandstands. But he stays close to the nuts and bolts of HMOs' focus on the bottom line and politicians' search for campaign funds from Big Pharma.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | June 24, 2007
WASHINGTON // The constituents are swarming through the Rayburn House Office Building. At the House Judiciary Committee offices, an elderly couple hopes Chairman John Conyers Jr. can address a friend's immigration problem, but an aide explains that the committee can only change laws, not intervene for individuals. While this drama unfolds quietly in the reception area, a political-action comedy takes screwball form in the rear quarters. Movieland publicity and political pep-rallying fuse with the appearance of a citizen who casts a bigger shadow.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2004
Since Revolutionary times, American soldiers have brought music into battle, but the latest entry in the "songs to kill by" category - as seen in Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11 - is a long way from the peppy inspiration of the fife and drum. Moore's anti-Bush, anti-war documentary, in a scene reminiscent of Apocalypse Now, features footage of troops in Iraq pumping up for battle by listening to the pounding rhythms of "Fire Water Burn," an eight-year-old release by the punk/hip-hop/Beastie Boys-inspired group, The Bloodhound Gang.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | January 23, 2007
WASHINGTON -- I used to wonder what the old, uh, ferrets of the newspaper business were talking about when they grew all wistful and blubbery about "the passing of an era." With the death of Art Buchwald, I no longer wonder. From at least the 1950s, he exemplified the brighter side of our business. He died last week at age 81. In June, he checked out of a hospice where he said he had grown tired of waiting to die from kidney failure. I didn't meet him until 2000, after he had suffered a stroke but had recovered well enough to resume writing his column.
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