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By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 24, 2001
NEW YORK - With the demise of Stanley Kubrick, Michael Mann has taken over as the reigning perfectionist of American movies. So talented is Mann that his invariably gritty and increasingly adult pictures have become events to rival sci-fi blockbusters. This happens even when his movies showcase little-known stars in commercially risky ventures. Think of Daniel Day-Lewis in The Last of the Mohicans (1992), a historically savvy revival of frontier romance, and pre-Gladiator Russell Crowe in 1999's The Insider , a muckraker about big tobacco and broadcasting that's also a paradigm of compromised corporate lives.
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By Jonathan Pitts and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
A Kent County man swam for more than five hours through the dangerous waters of Tangier Sound this week to seek help for four family members after the boat they were fishing in capsized during a sudden thunderstorm. John Franklin Riggs III, 46, of Rock Hall left the 16-foot motorboat about 7:30 Tuesday night after several waves swamped its stern, according to a statement issued by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources on Friday. Riggs, a commercial fisherman, reached shore on Deal Island about 1 a.m., knocked on the door of the closest residence to call for help, and was later aboard one of the rescue boats that pulled his father, sister, niece and nephew from the water.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 15, 1995
"Heat," from the Michael Mann who created "Miami Vice" and "Police Story," as well as "Thief," "Manhunter" and "Last of the Mohicans," is exactly what you might expect, only a lot better: A big, fat, full-tilt boogie, rockin', rollin' heavy metal concert for outlaws, outlaw wannabes, macho sentimentalists and gun cranks -- everyone who's ever felt a dribble of testosterone in his or her endocrine system.This is glandular, not intellectual, movie-making but it's at the highest end of technical expressiveness.
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By Michael Sragow | September 28, 2007
When David O. Russell made Three Kings in 1999, he thought he was shedding new light on the first Gulf War, a conflict that went by so quickly few journalists, let alone artists, stopped to see what our swift military victory had won. Eight years later and the movie not only survives as a sardonic adventure comparable in tone and scale to Catch-22, but as the sanest, funniest and most relevant American fiction-feature yet about American involvement in the Middle East.
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By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2001
Ali comes at you from every direction, much as Muhammad Ali did in his prime. It's one of the most ambitious biographical films ever made in this country, and one of the most unusual, moving and exciting. Everyone who has thrilled to an Ali fight, cheered one of his proclamations or rooted for him in his struggle against disease will want to see it and wrestle with it. This is the rare Hollywood picture worth arguing about. And once the arguments die down, audiences will be left with something that transcends the high points of battles in rings and courthouses - a sense of having been in the boxing shoes and street shoes of a man who embodied the divergent energies of an age. The movie has a hardscrabble integrity and stature.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert W. Butler and Robert W. Butler,Kansas city star | November 21, 1999
Jeffrey Wigand told the truth.He testified in court -- and for Mike Wallace in front of the "60 Minutes" cameras -- about his work as chief of research and development for Brown & Williamson Tobacco. He stated flatly that the heads of tobacco companies knew beyond a doubt that nicotine was addictive, even though they denied it before Congress. He said tobacco in cigarettes was routinely treated with chemicals to enhance the effect of the nicotine.Jeffrey Wigand told the truth. As a result, his marriage crumbled, he became unemployable in his field of expertise.
NEWS
October 16, 1998
Helen Irene Honse, 83, Rosedale school secretaryHelen Irene Honse, a former saleswoman, died Sunday of complications of a stroke at Franklin Square Hospital. She was 83 and resided in Essex.Mrs. Honse, who moved to Essex from Ligonier, Pa., in 1995, was a secretary at Shady Side Elementary School in Rosedale from 1996 until this year. She was formerly a sales associate in a Pittsburgh department store for many years.The former Helen Kling was born in Homestead, Pa., and graduated from high school there.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 27, 2002
A plane knifes diagonally across a darkening twilight sky, the distant roar of its engines blending into and then being replaced by the faint sound of a singer wailing through an electronic haze. The camera follows the plane as it disappears off the television screen. The scene is only nine seconds long, but it represents so much of what is right and all that is wrong with the pilot for Robbery Homicide Division, the new CBS cop drama from producer Michael Mann (Miami Vice), starring Tom Sizemore.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 11, 2005
White filmmakers - [Martin] Scorsese, Oliver Stone, Michael Mann - make films about all kinds of subjects," African-American filmmaker Antoine Fuqua told Variety's David Weddle two years ago. "They don't put themselves in a box. Why should we?"
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | December 24, 2004
Part of The Aviator's freshness comes from the filmmaker who first developed the script and then produced it: Michael Mann, director of The Last of the Mohicans (1992) and this year's Collateral. Approached by Leonardo DiCaprio, Mann worked on the project for three years. He hashed out the script for eight months with John Logan (Gladiator) before Logan went off and wrote it, and Mann "pretty much approved" the finished screenplay. But at one point, he says, "It came down to a choice of doing either Ali (2001)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 11, 2005
White filmmakers - [Martin] Scorsese, Oliver Stone, Michael Mann - make films about all kinds of subjects," African-American filmmaker Antoine Fuqua told Variety's David Weddle two years ago. "They don't put themselves in a box. Why should we?"
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | December 24, 2004
Part of The Aviator's freshness comes from the filmmaker who first developed the script and then produced it: Michael Mann, director of The Last of the Mohicans (1992) and this year's Collateral. Approached by Leonardo DiCaprio, Mann worked on the project for three years. He hashed out the script for eight months with John Logan (Gladiator) before Logan went off and wrote it, and Mann "pretty much approved" the finished screenplay. But at one point, he says, "It came down to a choice of doing either Ali (2001)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 27, 2002
A plane knifes diagonally across a darkening twilight sky, the distant roar of its engines blending into and then being replaced by the faint sound of a singer wailing through an electronic haze. The camera follows the plane as it disappears off the television screen. The scene is only nine seconds long, but it represents so much of what is right and all that is wrong with the pilot for Robbery Homicide Division, the new CBS cop drama from producer Michael Mann (Miami Vice), starring Tom Sizemore.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2001
Ali comes at you from every direction, much as Muhammad Ali did in his prime. It's one of the most ambitious biographical films ever made in this country, and one of the most unusual, moving and exciting. Everyone who has thrilled to an Ali fight, cheered one of his proclamations or rooted for him in his struggle against disease will want to see it and wrestle with it. This is the rare Hollywood picture worth arguing about. And once the arguments die down, audiences will be left with something that transcends the high points of battles in rings and courthouses - a sense of having been in the boxing shoes and street shoes of a man who embodied the divergent energies of an age. The movie has a hardscrabble integrity and stature.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 24, 2001
NEW YORK - With the demise of Stanley Kubrick, Michael Mann has taken over as the reigning perfectionist of American movies. So talented is Mann that his invariably gritty and increasingly adult pictures have become events to rival sci-fi blockbusters. This happens even when his movies showcase little-known stars in commercially risky ventures. Think of Daniel Day-Lewis in The Last of the Mohicans (1992), a historically savvy revival of frontier romance, and pre-Gladiator Russell Crowe in 1999's The Insider , a muckraker about big tobacco and broadcasting that's also a paradigm of compromised corporate lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert W. Butler and Robert W. Butler,Kansas city star | November 21, 1999
Jeffrey Wigand told the truth.He testified in court -- and for Mike Wallace in front of the "60 Minutes" cameras -- about his work as chief of research and development for Brown & Williamson Tobacco. He stated flatly that the heads of tobacco companies knew beyond a doubt that nicotine was addictive, even though they denied it before Congress. He said tobacco in cigarettes was routinely treated with chemicals to enhance the effect of the nicotine.Jeffrey Wigand told the truth. As a result, his marriage crumbled, he became unemployable in his field of expertise.
FEATURES
By Dallas Morning News | November 23, 1992
"Through ear and eye, we are both defined and manipulated fictions of such potency that they are able to replace our own experience, often becoming our sole experience of a reality.".$--Gore Vidal in "Screening History"Marie Antoinette was a kind and gracious lady who, under certain circumstances, could become a real party animal. Jim Garrison was a salt-of-the-earth guy whose instincts about a far-reaching conspiracy to assassinate President John F. Kennedy were largely accurate. And Christopher Columbus was stout-hearted visionary who didn't mean to cause anybody harm.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
A Kent County man swam for more than five hours through the dangerous waters of Tangier Sound this week to seek help for four family members after the boat they were fishing in capsized during a sudden thunderstorm. John Franklin Riggs III, 46, of Rock Hall left the 16-foot motorboat about 7:30 Tuesday night after several waves swamped its stern, according to a statement issued by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources on Friday. Riggs, a commercial fisherman, reached shore on Deal Island about 1 a.m., knocked on the door of the closest residence to call for help, and was later aboard one of the rescue boats that pulled his father, sister, niece and nephew from the water.
NEWS
October 16, 1998
Helen Irene Honse, 83, Rosedale school secretaryHelen Irene Honse, a former saleswoman, died Sunday of complications of a stroke at Franklin Square Hospital. She was 83 and resided in Essex.Mrs. Honse, who moved to Essex from Ligonier, Pa., in 1995, was a secretary at Shady Side Elementary School in Rosedale from 1996 until this year. She was formerly a sales associate in a Pittsburgh department store for many years.The former Helen Kling was born in Homestead, Pa., and graduated from high school there.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 15, 1995
"Heat," from the Michael Mann who created "Miami Vice" and "Police Story," as well as "Thief," "Manhunter" and "Last of the Mohicans," is exactly what you might expect, only a lot better: A big, fat, full-tilt boogie, rockin', rollin' heavy metal concert for outlaws, outlaw wannabes, macho sentimentalists and gun cranks -- everyone who's ever felt a dribble of testosterone in his or her endocrine system.This is glandular, not intellectual, movie-making but it's at the highest end of technical expressiveness.
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